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PPL checkride tomorrow, any advice?

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Hi all, I'm taking my PPL checkride tomorrow and hope to pass (obviously), I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions or advice for me to make my ride smooth?Thanks,Jeff USAF


Jeff

Commercial | Instrument | Multi-Engine Land

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Guest pilotcdc

Hi Jeff,Just from personal experience, I would say...1. Get a good night's rest. Yes, it may be hard to sleep thinking about tomorrow, but try anyway!2. EAT! This one's sometimes hard for me to do on checkride day because of nerves, but being nourished gives the body and brain energy which you definitely need to fly well.3. Relax! Easier said than done, but you know what's coming and you've been trained to do it.Lastly, just know you're ready. Your instructor wouldn't have signed you off otherwise. Do as you've been trained and everything will go fine.Good luck, let us know how it goes,ChristianCommercial Pilot: Airplane Single & Multiengine Land, Instrument Airplane, IGI, AGI

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Hi Jeff,#1. Relax.#2. Show the DE that YOU are in control, one of the biggest things he/she is looking for is your decision making.#3. Relax.#4. If you have a check airman at your flight club and he/she says you are ready, then taking the test is a breeze. Even if your CFI says you're rday (which he/she must have done), then trust his/her instincts.#5. Relax.#6. Have all you stuff (sectionals, log, a/c inspection records, amd - most importantly- the DE's check) all arranged neatly and in order. Look at the METAR and TAF for tomorrow, as you will no doubt be questioned on it.#7. Relax.Good luck, and hopefully we'll be welcoming you to world of aviators tomorrow. Let us know how you do!!Bruce.


ASEL, Instrument.

KBJC, Colorado.

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Hi,Thanks for all the good lucks and tips. I think I will do well, even with the wind at 14 knots as forecasted.Thanks again,Jeff USAF


Jeff

Commercial | Instrument | Multi-Engine Land

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Hi Jeff,I'm sure you'll do fine. In both of my check-rides (PP and IR) to date, given the fact that you are up for the ultimate test in the check-ride, I have flown better than I ever knew I could. If the 14 knots is cross-wind component, if you're in a C172 then you're well within the cross-wind handling of the plane. Judicious amounts of rudder! (Don't forget that the rudder- mostly forgotten as it's only used in turns and in the slow flight regime- is the most effective control surface in the aircraft.)Again, good luck! Let us know how you go!Bruce.


ASEL, Instrument.

KBJC, Colorado.

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Guest Callmecapt

I can't believe everyone forgot the most important thing. Fly SAFELY!!The instructor wants to make sure you can fly the plane...sure, but if you don't fly safely and keep a good lookout for potential accidents, he'll most likely frown on you for it.The best pilots are not the ones that can fly a plane, they're the ones who can fly a plane safely.RegardsGoran

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Guest monsoon

Speaking from experience as a present check pilot, callmecapt has the main ingedient. be SAFE. errors will always be made by everyone. just relax on the ride and IF you do make a mistake do NOT let it snowball. correct if able, shake it off and continue. i have done many PPC's and after a while you don't get so nervous because you realize they aren't such a big deal. good luck!

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Hello,That' right, first relax, second relax...There are several things that I like to see in an applicant when I check them:1/ they have to know that they will make mistake, I excpect them to detect those mistake and correct them.2/ None of us know every thing, so if he ask you a question for which you do not have the answer, do not guess, but tell him that you do not know, but that you do know where to get the answer. Then go and get it.3/Know your aispace, this one of the most important thing to know.4/ Always stay on the good side of safety margins.I have gone through many check rides, and one thing that I have noticed is you will always learn a lot of thing during your check ride.Last, but not least, I wish you a good luck, and keep us posted on you succes.Cpt Cyrille de Lattrewww.corporateaviationservices.comAsus P4P800/P4 2.4 giga/1.5 giga DDR/Ati 9700 pro 128 meg

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Jeff, Nothing more to add than the others have said really,I began to enjoy my checkide after a short while and I'm sure you will too. Let us know how you do.Good luck !!Ben


Ben Hall EGSS
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Guest bobsk8

After you pass your check ride ( notice I said after and not if), your biggest thrill will be when you take your first passenger for a ride. Go back every 6 months and fly for an hour with an instructor just to make sure you are not developing any bad habits. Most important thing to remember is just about the time you think you are almost capable of flying the airplane "backwards", that's the time it will bite you in the butt. As other's have said, Be safe!!!

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Yes, I should add that you should fly safely. Have a current AIM/FAR with you and have some idea of where to go look things up if you don't know them too.Back when you first soloed, you became a PIC, and a member of a very unique, pretsigious(sp?) and exclusive club of aviators. You've already done that, this is just another step in that progress. Enjoy!Bruce.


ASEL, Instrument.

KBJC, Colorado.

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Well apparently there is a new FAR that says that you cannot log instrument and night flight at the same time for private pilot requirements, sooooo. I have to go do .7 of night flying tonight and resume my checkride tomorrow morning, I did get the oral portion of the test out of the way, so now all that's left is the checkride and I have no doubt I will do well. I'll let you all know tomorrow since you guys wanted to know if I got my license or not.Thanks again for all of your help.Jeff USAF


Jeff

Commercial | Instrument | Multi-Engine Land

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Hi Jeff,No worries- all you have will be a letter of discontinuance. I got one too, both I and my CFI didn't realize that I didn't quite have the instrument time. Actualy, the DE never caught it either, so I had done my check-ride already. I had to go back after the additional 1 hour of simulated instrument, and the DE asked me to take him around the pattern once, doing any type of take-off and landing I wanted to. You'll do fine! By now you will have impressed him to no end with your oral knowledge!Tomorrow we'll be saying congratulations to Captain Jeff :)Bruce.


ASEL, Instrument.

KBJC, Colorado.

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