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Guest david248

Concerned About the college Program of AVIATION.

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First of all, I am sixteen and I have time before college. My number 1 concern is my math. I have never been smart in math but my dream seems to stay with aviation. I wont ever let that fail. Any pilots out there, please talk with me and tell me what I should do. I feel posting this in this forum would help because alot of mature people are always in this tab. Please anyone just give me some info. Am I in trouble for my college life? Western University for the Aeronautical Science Program. I am very concerned about how much trouble I am going to be in. How much math is actualy used in aviation? I don't know if I can do calculas. Triganometry seems very hard. I have'nt even got my Geometry in. Just alot of Basic Algebra. Thanks again. :)Davidhttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/747400.jpg

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Hi there David:-wave I myself am wanting to become an airline pilot and am a little older than you. However, i am not sure about how complex the maths is for airline pilots. I have recently purchased the oxford air training essential maths cd rom and found it to be an invaluable tool. Details can be find by clicking on the link below:http://www.oxfordaviation.net/company/new-cbt.htmI wouldn't concern myself with calculus because i have never seen it on the syllabus but trigonometry is definately there! There are a lot of very interesting and useful lessons on the above cd rom. I'm not brilliant at maths but was accepted onto flight training europe's ab intio atpl scheme!I hope this helps!Wishing you the very best luckJamie

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Cool, cheers for the link! I've signed up for a training program later this year in the US. The transition from work mode to training mode is gonna be tough :-) This product should help me out too, my math is a bit on the rough and rusty side.

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David,First let me wish you all the best in your chosen goals.I will tell you a little about myself. In high school I was a disaster, I think they just let me out to get rid of me. College was another story though. It is possible to reach advanced goals with determination and perseverance.I taught math at a community college. Many students I had did not think they could succeed in college math but they did. The secret is hard work, ask questions, do a lot of problems and hand in the home work. If you get an instructor you do not think is helping you ask for another instructor or additional help. It is your education and you need to take control of it. It is not like high school.Keep focused on your goals and don

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Hey:I thought the same until last year, and yesterday I finished the course registration for my freshman year... I wanted to study aeronautical engineering, but I ended up majoring in journalism. I like it. As much as aviation? Maybe not quite as much, but I'm not really great at math. Now, some may think I am giving up, but it comes down to this: You're going to be studying for what you plan to do for a good portion of your life (note I said "plan", because sometimes you study one thing and end up doing something that has nothing to do with it), so you might as well:1) Like it,2) Be good at it.Now, 1 is important because you want to enjoy what you're doing. But 2 is also important, because although you can keep up with the program by putting in additional effort, you will find yourself at a constant struggle and having to work harder for things. I am great at writing, debating and critical thinking, and I like photography. So what did I do? I opted for photojournalism.It's up to you, man. But if you're REALLY struggling, take that into consideration. I preferred going for something I'm good at AND like, since that's the formula for success IMO. My 2 cents, hope it helps as a contrasting opinion. :)Daniel P.http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/ng_driver.jpgMember of SJU Photography. [A HREF=http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?userid=9004]Click Here[/A] to view my aircraft photos at JetPhotos.Net!The official psychotic AA painter. :)

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Most of the math used by pilots is basic arithmetic. There is a touch of trig and a few other things, but not that much. Keep in mind that all of it is practical math, and not theoretical stuff. Its the kind of thing that anyone can get used to if they use it regularly. The whole sterotype about pilots having to be great at math is largely nonsense. Somewhere I even remember reading about a study that showed that most of the skills involved in being a good airplane pilot are focused in the artistic half of the brain, not the analytical half. As a private pilot myself, this does not surprise me. Flying really is an art, and that is what makes it so enjoyable and interesting. Andrew

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Hi David,Having been both poor at math in high school, but also an airline pilot, I feel qualified to answer your question.First, airline pilots don't use complex math on a daily basis. The most math I've used has been for computing weight and balance by hand, but the airline I worked for had an approved weight and balance program which used charts which simplified the process. Other math used requires interpolation of V-Speed numbers which again requires knowledge about reading charts. Most math used on the flight deck is simple because pilots don't want to be consumed by difficult tasks while they should be flying the airplane.That being said, upon entering college, I chose to overcome my mental shortcomings when it came to undertanding math. I started from the ground up and took basic algebra over again to form a solid foundation of learning for my future. I then chose engineering as a degree which required a mastery of Algebra and Calc. Two years into college I'd taken Algebra, Trig, Calc (Differential Equations, Integration, Derivatives, etc.) I'd done so averageing a B which is fine.What all this hard work did for me was expand my understanding for how to study. Studying math is one of the hardest disciplines you will encounter, but so is understanding aircraft systems. If you've taught yourself how to study difficult material early on in your career, you will develop study habits which will prepare you for the onslaught of systems classes during your primary airline training. These systems and company operating policies will be among the most challenging of study you will ever encounter. Not because it's difficult to understand, but because they give you little time to learn. This fast paced studying is referred to buy professional pilots as like "drinking water from a fire hose". There is a lot of information and its going to come fast.So, in summation (no pun intended) conquering your weaknesses in math now will indeed make you better at math, but most importantly it will teach you to overcome mental adversity and challenges.As you progress in your career, remember one other thing."Work is the weapon of honor, and he who lacks the weapon will never triumph". Get ready for alot of work, but you will succeed and will also enjoy doing it.Best of luck, and have fun.Gareth

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Hello,I'm not a professional pilot (yet), but I would imagine the mathematics involved is not that difficult. Having just finished a Uni degree with a heavy mathematical content, certainly the difficult side of mathematics is formula manipulation and derivation, not actually applying a given formula. I doubt deriving formulas is necessary, but I could be wrong. Perhaps some basic formula manipulation such as transposition could be needed, again I don

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Hi David,Speaking as a retired airline captain (737), I can agree with everything Gareth said in his post.What I would like to add is that advanced math isn't really necessary to fly jets, but having your M.S. (or better) degree in computer science, or (like me) mechanical engineering is a big plus to get hired as a pilot in todays economy.Lot's of applicants, and few openings mean there looking for the "cream-of-the-crop", and to have a solid degree (Computer Science especially) opens many, MANY, doors to careers, and getting yourself an interview.Getting your flight qualifications is a different story.Most airlines require a minimum of (USA) Commercial MEL (ATP is better), and at least 1,200 hours. I could write an entire topic on this, but you get the general idea here. :) My advice my friend, get your Masters degree in whatever disipline you like, cause it will be your best friend for life!!!!!!!!!!!Best of luck my friend!!Gerry:-ukliam EDIT: (NASA is looking for some good pilots too!)

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