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Guest BlueRidgeDx

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I'm sure I am not the only one that flys with auto coordination turned on. I like realism to a certain extent, but I prefer using Auto Co-ord checked. I'm not about to turn it off in FS9 just for the nosewheel realism aspect. I hope it is fixed in a future update.Regards,Tom

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Guest JTH

What exactly does auto-coordination do if you don't mind me asking?

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Guest Steve_Park

>What exactly does auto-coordination do if you don't mind me>asking?It moves the Rudder (and hence nose gear) when you turn the yoke (Joystick) to the left or right.Steve Park

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It's my understnding that all modern jets fly under auto coordination; only when crabbing for landing or similar situation would the pilot command the rudder. No? PatAMD A64 4000+ @ 2.6GHz, Zalman7700Cu cooler, Corsair XMS 1GB DDR, LTK6800GT-OC, Asus A8V MoBo, WDRaptor10KrpmHDD, TrackIR4, CH FSYoke + TQ, XP-hsp2


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Guest BlueRidgeDx

For what its worth, the nose wheel steering WILL absolutely move when the aircraft is stopped. I know this because I was pushing an Evergreen 747 at Rickenbacker ANGB when I had to stop short for a FedEx MD-11 passing behind us. I was only half way through my turn when the crew told me to hold and wait for the FedEx jet to pass, so the nosewheels were still turned about 20 degrees. The mechanic, thinking that the push was complete, decided to pull the by-pass pin without getting a "brakes set" hand signal, and without removing the towbar. Do you know what happens when you remove the bypass pin with the wheels turned? They center themselves with 3000psi of hydraulic pressure.Do you know what happens to a towbar when the shear-pins have been welded into place by a retarded GSE mechanic? It splinters, with a horrific crack that you can hear over the whine of the engines even with "ears" on.To this day, I have no idea what possesed the the mechanic to pull that pin. It also eludes me why anyone would weld the shear-pins into a towbar...but that is neither here nor there.The point is, if the hydraulic strength is enough to center the nose wheels while stopped, then its also strong enough to move them through tiller movement.Regards,Nick

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Ok, I asked captain Alan Carter - the one who is featured on the ITVV dvd video (Hethrow to San Francisco flight). He is a well known 744 captain formerly with Virgin Atlantic, then Asiana .. now I am not sure where he flies. But this is what he emailed me on this subject.It would be very difficult under normal circumstances to turn the nosewheel whilst stationary. It is for this reason that whilst taxiing we try to stop with the nosewheel straight; otherwise an excessive amount of thrust is required to get the aircraft underway once again.However, if the tarmac is icy, then yes you would be able to move the nosewheel whilst stationary.As an aside the hydraulic system one would need to be pressurised for the nosewheel steering to function, either by the engine driven pump if number one engine is running or by using the air driven pump should their be APU bleed air available.I hope this answers your question. Feel free to ask me again in the future.Michael J.http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/pmdg_744F.jpghttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-beta.jpg


Michael J.

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Guest BlueRidgeDx

I thought my story above illustrated the defitive answer pretty clearly...Regardless of what any pilot tells you, the NWS WILL turn while stationary. I've seen it countless times with my own two eyes...on 747-200F's, 747-400F's, MD-11's, A300B4F's, 757's, A319/320's, DC-9's, and 717's.Here's another trip for you. When you push a 727, you usually disconnect the NLG "scissors", allowing the nosewheel assembly to freely caster. When you're done pushing, you have to reconnect them, and half the time, the upper and lower arms do not line up. I personally, have grabbed the lower scissor arm, and with my own strength, turned the nose wheels left/right as needed to line up the arms. I'm fairly confident that if I can do it, then 3000psi of hydraulic power can do it. With the oleo and shock strut centered vertically above a dual wheel assembly, the only friction that needs to be overcome is rolling friction...there is very little scrubbing.Regards,Nick

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>Regardless of what any pilot tells you, the NWS WILL>turn while stationary. Sorry, I rather listen to pilots, since they are the ones who sit in the cockpit and move the tiller. Michael J.


Michael J.

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Guest SKireyev

>It's my understnding that all modern jets fly under auto>coordination; only when crabbing for landing or similar>situation would the pilot command the rudder. No? >>>Pat>>>AMD A64 4000+ @ 2.6GHz, Zalman7700Cu cooler, Corsair XMS 1GB>DDR, LTK6800GT-OC, Asus A8V MoBo, WDRaptor10KrpmHDD, TrackIR4,>CH FSYoke + TQ, XP-hsp2Absolutely not. Your autopilot/auto flight system would control all three axes if it is engaged. However, with pilot hand-flying the plane he/she is responsible for rudder control. There's nothing auto-coordinating it in the real world. That's why that is under realism options.Cheers,

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Guest SKireyev

> I personally, have grabbed the lower scissor arm,>and with my own strength, turned the nose wheels left/right as>needed to line up the arms. Sorry, gotta call BS on that one! How much weight is resting on that wheel? You'd have trouble turning it in a car with steering shaft disconnected, or even the upper and lower arms. You'd kill yourself trying to do it on a semi. And that's nowhere close to the weight of the 747. And I am not talking about any resistance from the steering mechanism, just the friction alone. Yah....that's gonna happen!

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Guest BlueRidgeDx

I feel so....ineffective. What part of my story doesn't make sense to you? I'm telling you that I've SEEN IT, first hand. I'm not talking theory here. I watched, and heard an 8" diameter towbar literally come apart as the nosewheels centered themselves after the bypass pin was removed.The only role the tiller played, was that it was commanding a centered position, which, once hydraulically powered, the nosewheels were more than happy to obey. All this was on a heavily loaded 747-200F, mind you.Did you ask your captain friend how many times he's actually tried turning the tiller while stopped? I'd bet its something he's never done, because you're taught not to do that. All the talk about not stopping with the NWS turned, and not initiating a turn without some forward movement is absolutely true. But that is referring to procedure, not capability. The airplane has the capability to do it, even if it is not recommended procedure.Ask Capt. Randazzo what it was like to park a J-41 at the old "A" gates in IAD. Of course a J-41 isn't a 747, but its the same pricipal.Regards,Nick

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Guest BlueRidgeDx

All right, this is obviously a losing battle...But just for the record, would you like to tell us how many times YOU have pushed a 727 and had to reconnect the scissors? Hmmmm?"Yah...that did happen!"Warmest Regards,Nick

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Nick,you are obviously full of contempt for captains what they know about aircraft, what their capabilities are, and whether they tried something or not. By the way your "centering" argument is a poor one on pure logic since from this one can deduce nothing what is achievable from the cockpit. Michael J.http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/pmdg_744F.jpghttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-beta.jpg


Michael J.

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