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"Engine Flame-Outs during heavy precipitation and at V ...

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Hello,May I ask what does this exactly mean in FSX? Does it mean that if you're flying through CB clouds the engines could flame out, and if so, how does it recognize which CB has the thickest/biggest hail etc? Does this really happen in real life too?

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"Does this really happen in real life too?"Um... yes... Torrential rain can snuff out engines (although you might not believe it if you'd seen those firemen trying to hose out an engine to stop it running... and not doing a very good job). I'm sure Google will bring up a few examples (especially in Indonesia).Aircraft are fitted with weather radar so you can (try to) fly around bad weather. Of course, there is also the physical damage the hail and the severe turbulence can do... Cracked windscreens, skin like a golf ball, etc...Cheers.Q>

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Guest threedeltamax

skin like a golf ball, etc...Great for overtime :D

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Thanks Q.This was new to me. I used to think that the engines are designed to withstand all sort of hail and rain. But of course to think that a huge chunk of ice goes through it it cant be good either.I dont think I've ever heard of all engines flame out because of rain/hail. But yes, I do know some volcanic ash flameouts from Indonesia. I've been there two times and they sure have lots of active volcanoes.Anyway, just wondering how does the PMDG simulation determine when the plane is flying through severe hail? Does it recognize CB clouds in FSX and then just randomly flame out an engine when flying through it?

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Guest D17S

Well, you probably won't believe this one. We had a C-130 (ahhh L-382H) broken down in St. Croix. Caribbean paradise? Sure, I'll go. To the rescue!I get there and the crew says listen to this. A little short of TO power, #2 engine was making a heck of a noise. Bang , bang, like. "Want to hear it again?" "Oh no, that's OK. How many times have you tried this?" I asked. "Lots, we want to go." "OK. Just go the hotel. I'll let you know" I advised. Off they went. Oh boy. Thinking there's probably nothing left in there, but also the consummate optimist, these 501 compressor stalls were generally caused by a stuck-open bleed valve. Sturdy engines those 501D22/Garrets. It could have survived the pounding, but how to unstick that valve? Take something apart, with tools? Please! No way. Call the fire department.So out comes the St. Croix fire department with an old pumper truck. I told em, point it in that hole below the prop. Once I get it running, let 'er rip. So I get it fired up and hang out the window and give the Chief the high sign . . . and he lets 'er rip. Full fire hose stream into the inlet of #2 engine. The engine starts to unwind and I give the Chief the wave off. Too much water tended to put my fire out. "Chief, ease up a notch." I'd wave emphatically. "Hey, puttin' the fire out's my job" the Chief would grin back. We finally found a nice water-injection balance between power and water. Had a great fog show going. And in the end, it all worked out. The airplane made the trip and I got a couple of days in paradise. So, yup. Ya flood 'em hard enough and you really can put 'em out.(Are those little fire trucks I see running round FSX, hummm.)

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But what about those monsterous GE's on the 777 documentary whereby they have the engine running on mount while they inject tons of water and a bunch of frozen chickens into it? Chickens to simulate bird-strikes IIRC. According to the documentery, that engine was designed to deal with environments like this. It was soo cool to watch too.If it's raining hard-enough, will airlines cease takeoff and landing operations just based on how hard its raining becuase of flameouts? Until this thread, I never thought rain itself was much of a concern for jet engines.


Regards,
Al Jordan
------------
KMLB

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True... I think the bigger the bypass ratio, the less chance you have of a flameout. I'm just wondering if the ignition systems were manually turned on for the tests? Actually, I think the FROZEN chickens DID do a lot of damage (???).... so they decided to thaw them out. Airflow disruption can be a big issue. I'm just wondering if they've tried firing large quantities of hailstones at engines in test cells?Icing and nose cowl damage can disrupt airflow. When we do walkarounds, we check for dents in the nacelle leading edge and damage to the inlet lining. Depending on the type of ignition system, ignitors are automatically turned on when NAI is activated (When the ice is melted or breaks off in chunks, it can cause problems, so the ignitors are turned on). On RB211's, they are only turned on for a minute, I recall.. to get over the initial melting period.Cheers.Q>

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Guest fjshepherd

They weren't frozen, by my memory.

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