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Thrust reveres

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3DSMAX does have a system where it calculates the shape of the objects and prevents them from passing through, but it's very cpu intensive and time consuming. You'll find it under Utilities -> Dynamics and also useful info in the help files.Bones on the other hand, they're basically a parent-child chain where if you move the child bones, the other child bones connected will follow it. They need to be assigned to an object for objects to move properly, else there's no point having them :)

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Well Philippe, Now I'm really impressed, I love the Gear movie.You're right, better to build in 3D drawings before hammer and nailing.Regarding School and going to work..... well.... As far as I'm concerned, they're both the same..... IT'S WORK!!!!:)The difference is though, one you fill you're brain with knowledge, the second you fill your pocket with money. And, if you do the first one before the second, you'll put more money in your pocket and have more choices of how you going to do that:)Alright! I'll shut up and go back to my sim building:DKeep up the good work Philippe.

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I didn't read all replies. So i'm maybe tellin same thing again.But as i know (this is tested on real simulators). This is how it works at least on Boeing 757, DC-9 and MD-80-series planes. (and this should be same on all Boeing and MD jets)Normal thrust is as it is. Pull forward and it gives you power.For reverse you have those reverse levers. You pull them some amount 30-50% of full movement. This open reverse cowls (or whatever they are). Rest of movement on reverse levers is for throttle. So you don't pull throttle forward when reverses are enganged. But instead pull reverse lever up.Here is how i did it: http://mikkila.wabbits.org/data/fsbus/thro..._scaled_640.jpghttp://mikkila.wabbits.org/data/fsbus/thro..._scaled_640.jpgMore details can be found: http://mikkila.wabbits.org/fsbus/throttle- J

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>For reverse you have those reverse levers. You pull them some>amount 30-50% of full movement. This open reverse cowls (or>whatever they are). Rest of movement on reverse levers is for>throttle. So you don't pull throttle forward when reverses are>enganged. But instead pull reverse lever up.REally?I always thought that the actual power was commanded by thrust levers, while rever levers only commanded nacelles...Thank you for your info.

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Like i told. I got this by own experience from real simulators. Reverse movement is actually guite big. From some 120 to almost almost 180 degrees. Depends on aircraft.And ofcourse. There is some differencies. Usually they are with props and Airbus.On A32x series you pull first reverse levers fully up, then pull throttles itself back to get power. Not forward. No idea how they work on other Airbus throttles.On props there is many different types seen. Because props usually turn propeller blade to negative. Also applying power works different way.- J

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I guess both ways exist depending on the aircraft type. Check the aircraft manual :) On 757 it is definitely like Jari explained. There is also a slight delay when the reverse thingy opens on the engine, while the reverse lever is locked mid-way up (idle reverse position I guess) - and once the reversers are fully open you can pull the reverser handles even more to adjust the throttle and thus get more reverse. Though, um, I guess one needs to consider what is practical and worth the effort, but one could perhaps do this with FSBUS CCC - have reverser actuate FS reverser, but also a FSBUS switch wiht a timer of, say, 2 seconds. Now there could be a solenoid or something keeping a bolt in the way of the reverser handle, so it cannot be pulled back fully - and once the 2 seconds has passed, the solenoid pops out of the way. But then again, I have no clue if FS allows variable reverse, or if it is just max reverse thrust. I am not into the hairdryers anyway, so I havent really looked. Props interest me more. But this is what I know from the 757, what I have heard and what I think might work - in other words my EUR 0.02 :)//Tuomas

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>I guess both ways exist depending on the aircraft type. Check>the aircraft manual :) On 757 it is definitely like Jari>explained. >>But then again, I have no clue if FS allows variable reverse,>or if it is just max reverse thrust. And on DC-9 and MD-80 series it is same way as 757 (and 767). And as far as i know, 737 and 747 works same way.Propeller side things goes differently. Like i told earlier. I have seen somewhere that it works like it that you pull reverse levers to get negative thrust and then push to get power. Another goes just that you pull throttle levers back to get negative blade angle and same time you get more power. Like Tuomas said. Check manuals.And for FS. FS itself does not have axle for reverses. This can be done throug fox example FSBus, via FSUIPC offset. This way you get correct way working reverses. One axle for each engine reverses.Or if you are using joystick axles. With FSUIPC. There is place where you can set one axle as reverses. Only problem is that there is only one axle for every engines. For throttle there can be one lever for each engine, but for reverses one is active, rest are dummies.Or simply use switch, what is quite widely used and most easy way to do it.- J

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Since you're starting to talk props, let me add my system here.I have props (Fokker50).The real system is such that you have 3 "zones" of motion for your power levers.First you start at Ground Idle. Ground Idle has 0

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Got information that on ATR reverses works quite same way as here is described.- J

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