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Landing specs

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I cannot find the landing specifications of the Dash 300Is there documentation about that?TIAFrans

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Are you looking for speeds, or landing weights.Landing weight is 42,000 for a -300. I have speed cards, but it will take a while to write them in.

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I need speed, flaps and runway length.Trial and error 160 kts and flaps 10?Frans

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Most landings are done with flaps 15. Flap speed for 15 is 150. Depending on your landing weight, approach speed should be in the neighborhood of 120 or so.If you're on a shorter runway, you can select flaps 35. Flap speed there is 138. You'll have to carry more power longer down final, and approach speed will be a tad lower.Min runway I'd use for a -300 is 6000ft, but it can be done much shorter.Flap speeds are:5: 16315: 15035: 138

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Frans: I have quite a bit of info on this post if you still need it. Please let me know.Russ

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Frans: Before I go into it, is it fair to assume you have downloaded the Dash-8 Manuals from PSS, most importantly Part Two which contains all the Speed Charts?Russ

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Frans: Here's a couple of things to start with. First, the Max all-up weight for the 300 is 42,578 Pounds, which means that DashTrash was in error saying the Landing Weight was 42,000 Pounds. Except in rare cases, I would expect to see the Dash at around 35-38 thousand pounds, sometimes much lighter.Now about Speeds. In Part Two of the Flight Manual are a number of speed charts. For this discussion, use the small oblong charts that start with a weight of 30,000 pounds and go up to 43,000 Pounds. Note that each chart has V Speed listings in Blue, and at the bottom is a small white rectangle with, from left to right, 35 degrees, 15 degrees, and 0 degrees. This white area is titled "V REF".Vref means Reference Landing Approach Speed, and is calculated as 1.3 Times Stall Speed. It is the LOWEST safe speed to fly the airplane at each of the 3 Flap Settings. So, at 32,000 Pounds, Vref for 15 degree of flap is 95KIAS....But, you sure don't want to fly it THAT slow. Standard Practice is to use Vref+15, or, in this case, 110KIAS would be the Approach Speed on Final. I would think that any 4,000 foot runway would accomodate A DASH at most any weight.For takeoff, this same airplane at a weight of, say 34,000 pounds, would use 85KIAS with 15 Flap for V1/VR, V2 91KIAS, and a cruise climb around 160KIAS or thereabouts.Hope this is of some value, and please be sure and get those charts if you haven't already.Russ

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Well, thanks for your extensive answer Russ.First thanks for the additional information about the GW.Second it should be nice if Phoenix had the chapter on page 11 named Take Off and Landing Settings! Now I just doe notice it because you draw my attention on it.Thanks again RussFranshttp://home.planet.nl/~dek00598/airfrans

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If 6000' is the min you'd use for a Dash 300, you are better off flying a jet. The Dash can land and or takeoof comfortably on a 4000' without any problems (of course weight restrictions will have to be taken into account).Caribbean flying is a good example for the Dash 300 where some fields/runways barely exceed 4000'. The Dash is also well know to perform LAHSO (Land and Hold Short) at major airports where there are intersecting runways in use.The Dash ...... Versatile machine in all aspectsKroswynd

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I've got around 2000 hrs in everything but the Q400.Our -300s are all 311's, except for one 315, and all have been equipped with ditching dams on the rear emergency exits which brings the MTOW up to 43,000 lbs. MTOW without the dam is significantly lower.Ramp wt 43,200TOW 43,000Landing wt. 42,000Zero fuel wt 39,500.Yes, 6000ft is a lot of runway for a Dash, but in the real world, you would be weight restricted off that kind of runway in a 300. They are real pigs when loaded down. If you're talking -100 or -200, 4000 ft is plenty of runway at almost any weight.The -300 is a very different animal compared to the short Dashes. Much better airplane to fly, and more versatile, but requires jet sized runways and approach speeds. We have a fun time with controllers when flying the 300s to airports where they are used to the -100s. Even from an ATC standpoint, its a different animal.

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Just to add my two cents here:I fly the 301, 311 and 315 model and I feel as that this whole bit about runway length is symantecs and really based on who legally provides your runway analysis. I often find that the performance gives me the option of FLAP10 for takeoff on runways up to 5900' and the ability to reduce T/O Torque to 82% at MGTOW, no problems.If the runway is shorter, we can still reduce, even the 301, 311 and use T/O FLAP15.The DH8C is a champion performer, and never even though I've never been in a 100 or 200, my friends at LIAT and the test crew at Bombardier both say the 300 is THE machine to fly.Now the 400 is a totally different beast all together.Would be nice to get in one of those!Happy flying!Chris de Barros/MYNNBahamasair DHC8-300

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Flaps 10 takeoff? That's a novel idea. We don't have nay data on them, probably since we're qualified in -100, -200, and -300. The short Dashes don't have the 10 degree selection, they ignore it altogether at my company with our -300s.You're not missing out on anything from not flying -100s. They are pigs, plain and simple. The -200 on the other hand is my favorite hands down. Almost the same power as a 300 with a lot less weight. It can hit 3000 fpm climbing out when light, and almost always over 2000 fpm during normal conditions. When you level off, it goes straight to the barberpole.Also has some systems improvements over the 100 / 300 such as ECU driven torque bugs, the PTU plumbed to run the entire number 2 system, and a different rudder shutoff valve.The 200 is definately my choice for performance, but for handling and hauling a lot of stuff, you're dead on about the -300.

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