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ilovetofly

Rate Of Climb

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On a number of depature charts are instructions to maintain a climb rate of say, 360' per NM. As an example, the Biorka One Departure out of PASI (Rocky Guitierrez, Sitka AK) for RWY 11 says: "minimum climb requirements: 180 knots or less, 390' per NM to 1600; more than 180 knots, 640' per NM to 3400".What is the formula to determine the rate of climb in relation to speed to meet the take-off minimum?Thanks for any help.Jim D.

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On a number of depature charts are instructions to maintain a climb rate of say, 360' per NM. As an example, the Biorka One Departure out of PASI (Rocky Guitierrez, Sitka AK) for RWY 11 says: "minimum climb requirements: 180 knots or less, 390' per NM to 1600; more than 180 knots, 640' per NM to 3400".What is the formula to determine the rate of climb in relation to speed to meet the take-off minimum?Thanks for any help.Jim D.
Divide how fast you will go by 60 to get your miles per minute. Multiply that by the required climb per nm to get the necessary rate of climb you need to achieve.180/60=3 miles per minute3*390=1170 fpm climb

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Quick Google search reveals for example this chart. If you have a closer look, you will even find a table that tells you the required vertical speed for a given ground speed. Of course that might not apply to all charts that you might come across, but I have at least seen it on numerous Jeppesen charts.

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Quick Google search reveals for example this chart. If you have a closer look, you will even find a table that tells you the required vertical speed for a given ground speed. Of course that might not apply to all charts that you might come across, but I have at least seen it on numerous Jeppesen charts.
I've never seen that on the NACO charts, but there is a table on page D1 in most plate booklets (Terminal Proceedure booklet for those wanting the official name - TP for short, and I think TP is the paper they print them on. :()According to the table:
							 Ground Speed (knots)f/nm|   30   60   80	90   100   120   140   150   180   210   240   270   300350 |  175  350  467   525   583   700   816   875  1050  1225  1400  1575  1750400 |  200  400  533   600   667   800   933  1000  1200  1400  1600  1700  2000650 |  325  650  867   975  1083  1300  1516  1625  1950  2275  2600  2925  3250700 |  350  700  933  1050  1400  1633  1633  1750  2100  2450  2800  3150  3500

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Thanks everyone. As you can tell I'm not much of a mathimaticion as I should have figured that one on my own. But that is why we are all here, to help each other out. Thanks againJim D.

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You got it Jim, just keep asking. And happy new year to y'all, mine starts in twenty-two minutes. Gotta get ready. :(See ya!Etienne

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It's just one of those unit conversion problems, converting from ft/nm to ft/min. Using KevingAu's numbers:Should be a chart in the NACOs TPPs also. :(

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Jeppesen approach plates also have a very extensive chart. Same data, just slightly different layout.

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