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ilovetofly

Dme Arc

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Some time ago I posted the following question in of the forums, but it no longer appears using a number of search options. So I'm posting it again since I forgot how to do this.How does one program a DME ARC into the FMC for the Boeing aircraft?ILS for RWY 14 at PANC (Anchorage, AK) requires a DME ARC @ 18 nm from the ANC VOR and I haven't done one in so long that the process skips me for now.I would appreciate some help here.Jim D.

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Some time ago I posted the following question in of the forums, but it no longer appears using a number of search options. So I'm posting it again since I forgot how to do this.How does one program a DME ARC into the FMC for the Boeing aircraft?ILS for RWY 14 at PANC (Anchorage, AK) requires a DME ARC @ 18 nm from the ANC VOR and I haven't done one in so long that the process skips me for now.I would appreciate some help here.Jim D.
I know how to fly one manually in a 172 but don't know how to help you with the FMC. Which sim aircraft are you wanting to do this with?

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http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0813/05132IL34L.PDFLets assume you want to fly the approach in from HENSI. 1) After HENSI, go to your legs page, and input JAN255/25 (Jackson VOR, 255 Radial, 25 miles) It will show up in the FMC as JAN012) Continue around the arc in 10 degree increments. IE: JAN245/25, JAN235/25, etc.

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http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0813/05132IL34L.PDFLets assume you want to fly the approach in from HENSI. 1) After HENSI, go to your legs page, and input JAN255/25 (Jackson VOR, 255 Radial, 25 miles) It will show up in the FMC as JAN012) Continue around the arc in 10 degree increments. IE: JAN245/25, JAN235/25, etc.
Thanks a million. That is what I was looking for.Jim D.

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Shouldn't the arc be part of the procedure once you load up the approach in the FMS?? :(

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Shouldn't the arc be part of the procedure once you load up the approach in the FMS?? :(
I don't believe that an arc is programmed into the FMC, at least I haven't seen one. If the two waypoints (or more) are part of the arc, the FMC will do a direct to the following waypoint instead of an arc. There are a few airports that have an arc as part of the approach, but it's not all that common. So the arc needs to be flown by hand, by auto pilot and hdg adjustments or programmed into the FMC and a DME is probably required in the aircraft.Now I could be wrong here, so if anyone has better knowledge, let us know.Jim D.

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I don't believe that an arc is programmed into the FMC, at least I haven't seen one. If the two waypoints (or more) are part of the arc, the FMC will do a direct to the following waypoint instead of an arc. There are a few airports that have an arc as part of the approach, but it's not all that common. So the arc needs to be flown by hand, by auto pilot and hdg adjustments or programmed into the FMC and a DME is probably required in the aircraft.Now I could be wrong here, so if anyone has better knowledge, let us know.Jim D.
Ok well just to confirm we are talking about the same thing here, I do not mean a manually programmed arc (as shown above), but rather one that exists as part of a published procedure. Since ARINC424 does have for instance the arc-to-fix (AF) leg, I think it should be very well possible that an arc could be part of the FMS procedure, furthermore a FD/AP with lateral guidance should be able to follow it. But then again, I can't prove since I unfortunately don't have adequate resources. If anyone did, please do chime in here since I'd now be very curious and interested! :(Kind regardsEtienne

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Ok well just to confirm we are talking about the same thing here, I do not mean a manually programmed arc (as shown above), but rather one that exists as part of a published procedure. Since ARINC424 does have for instance the arc-to-fix (AF) leg, I think it should be very well possible that an arc could be part of the FMS procedure, furthermore a FD/AP with lateral guidance should be able to follow it. But then again, I can't prove since I unfortunately don't have adequate resources. If anyone did, please do chime in here since I'd now be very curious and interested! :(Kind regardsEtienne
I've not heard of anyone flying a DME arc with the FMC either unless they programmed waypoints themselves in 10

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I've not heard of anyone flying a DME arc with the FMC either unless they programmed waypoints themselves in 10

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Some time ago I posted the following question in of the forums, but it no longer appears using a number of search options. So I'm posting it again since I forgot how to do this.How does one program a DME ARC into the FMC for the Boeing aircraft?ILS for RWY 14 at PANC (Anchorage, AK) requires a DME ARC @ 18 nm from the ANC VOR and I haven't done one in so long that the process skips me for now.I would appreciate some help here.Jim D.
In the real world, and for any aircraft with a FMC, if there is a DME arc associated with a published transition to an approach or as a transition on a published departure, all you have to do is select that transition in the FMC Dep/Arr menus and the DME arc will be loaded and available for LNAV tracking. In the MSFS world though, it will depend on the database you have loaded for your addon. As far as Navigraph's 0810 database which I am using in my game, there are DME arcs available. Just took a quick look using PMDG 737 and 0810 data at MMZT and the arcs are there for both departures and arrivals. In the PMDG FMC, the arcs are built using waypoints separated every ten degrees along the arc path.In the real world, FMCs using IFR approved data will have and are capable of commanding tracking of dme arcs. There is no need nor should you ever, program your own procedure/transition on an ad hoc basis in real world IFR flying. Neither do the real world FMCs "trick" the plane into following an arc by programming in waypoints every ten degrees along the arc. If an airplane is expensive enough to have an FMC installed, the FMC is going to be capable of flying an arc track. The only waypoints you'll see in the FMC are those that are published on the chart along that arc.

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In the real world, and for any aircraft with a FMC, if there is a DME arc associated with a published transition to an approach or as a transition on a published departure, all you have to do is select that transition in the FMC Dep/Arr menus and the DME arc will be loaded and available for LNAV tracking. [...]In the real world, FMCs using IFR approved data will have and are capable of commanding tracking of dme arcs. There is no need nor should you ever, program your own procedure/transition on an ad hoc basis in real world IFR flying. Neither do the real world FMCs "trick" the plane into following an arc by programming in waypoints every ten degrees along the arc. If an airplane is expensive enough to have an FMC installed, the FMC is going to be capable of flying an arc track. The only waypoints you'll see in the FMC are those that are published on the chart along that arc.
Yeah exactly thank you, that's what I think too. :(

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Ok thank you, I understand, but just to clarify in this case, are you now talking about MSFS or r/w?
That was for FS flyers as I've read in the past, but your questions has been answered.Never have used an FMS, Omega, INS, or any other aids of that sort myself either real-world or in FS. Most of my flying is by hand except for the cruise portion.Sorry I didn't see it sooner. Many catagories on this forum to wade through.

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