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Guest evanxmcr

power emergency

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this happened to me in multiplayer mode. i was in an extra 300 s in fsx flying short circles around honolulu's airport. as i hit about half fuel at 1000 feet and several miles away from the airport the low voltage light comes on, the engine makes weird noises the key turns and the engine turns off. what is the procedure for this situation if u cannot get the engine to start and you are at a low speed.

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First Priority always is "Flying the Airplane"-Aviate-Navigate-CommunicateIn that orderIn an Extra means returning to Straight and Level Flight and pitch to Best Glide Speed unlessyou are well above glide speed, then maintain Level Flight trimming to Best Glide Speed ("slow down before you go down")While I'm pitching for best glide, the other hand is going to be pushing Mixture/Prop/Throttle -> Full Forward and Carb Heat/Alt. Air ONPick a field and Proceed toward it.Remaining Items If I have Time:Run thru a memorized Restart Checklist. Panel Left to Right (e.g. in a PA-28)Switch Fuel TanksCycle thru Mags (L/R/Both)Master ONBoost Pump ONPrimer IN/LockedThrottle/Mixture Full Forward (If time one could spend jockeying them around a bit)Carb Heat ONThere are other items one would do as a RW pilot like: Squawking 7700, attempting to make radio contact (last freq you are on or 121.5) Preparing the aircraft for an off-field landing if such is the case, running thru the appropriate Emergency Checklist in the Flight Manual... But for Flight Sim-ing Engine Out:Best Glide SpeedPick a Field & Fly to itMemorized Restart ChecklistFSX Swiss Outing & Catalina Day Spa are two excellent missions to practice the above Flight Sim Engine Out procedure.

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To add to the procedure above, make sure to pull the throttle and mixture back before landing. Aircraft in the real-world have been known to restart in the flare and the sudden thrust change will screw up your landing. This tends to happen if fuel starvation is the cause of the engine failure. All aircraft have "unusable" fuel that normally can not be sucked out of the tank. During the flare, it can shift and reach the fuel system. In this case, the engine will quickly die again. Either way, an engine restarting in the flare, will balloon you up and either cause you to land longer than anticipated or stall you out when it dies again and slam you in.

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To add to the procedure above, make sure to pull the throttle and mixture back before landing. Aircraft in the real-world have been known to restart in the flare and the sudden thrust change will screw up your landing. This tends to happen if fuel starvation is the cause of the engine failure. All aircraft have "unusable" fuel that normally can not be sucked out of the tank. During the flare, it can shift and reach the fuel system. In this case, the engine will quickly die again. Either way, an engine restarting in the flare, will balloon you up and either cause you to land longer than anticipated or stall you out when it dies again and slam you in.
To add to that for multi-engine aircraft, if one engine restarts and you are below Vmc, you'll be quickly landing on your head in the field.

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To add to that for multi-engine aircraft, if one engine restarts and you are below Vmc, you'll be quickly landing on your head in the field.
Yeah, once you've committed to landing with an engine out, you want to make sure it stays out after that point.

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