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How to land perfectly on the runway?

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How to land perfectly on the runway?And on the plane before departure, why the pilot has to throttle the engines. However the plane didn't go fast on the taxiway?

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In answer to your first question: PRACTICE! That's part of the fun of it all!!I don't understand the second question.Have a nice day!Gavin

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Second question: You normally start with full power of the engine(s) before you release the breaks and take off (in contrast to how you run a car or should run a car).Roland

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Hello CityBus!On number one: PACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE.On number two: It depends on:Airport runway lengthAircraft weightWeather: Atmospheric Pressure, winds, etc.Noise abatement rules in place in the areaHope this helps!Sincerely,Dennis D. Mullert

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Well I am not sure. Because I was on board JAL B747-400. After the backup. The plane turn to the taxiway and stop. I heard noises from the turbine. Then I was wondering why they did that and how to did it in FS 2002?

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If you are talking about the runup before a general aviation aircraft (like a Cessna 172) takes the runway, there are some checks you have to do to make sure your aircraft will fly before you actually go.So you runup with the brakes engaged so that you don't roll anywhereThe things you are checking:- magnetos, they provide the spark in your cylinders.- some times your spark plugs are fouled and consequently your engine doesn't develop full power. Checking magnetos will identify fouled spark plugs. and give you a chance to clear the fouled plugs- carb heat - to make sure your carburator is icing up.- checking the vacuum in your engine driven vacuum pump to make sure your gyroscoping instruments will work properly- and checking that your altenator is working and providing electrical power to drive your electronic equipment instead of your battery. (the alternator is also driven by the engine.)- If you're flying a constant speed prop you're checking to ensure your prop control works properly because it uses engine oil to control the pitch of the prop blades. If you develop a leak in this system, all of your engine oil will leave thru this system and then you won't have any oil left to cool your engine.Hope this helps.Apologies if I answered the wrong question. or am completely off base.Talking about landing perfectly....Landing perfectly is something we all shoot for, but I'd say we don't get perfect landings very often.I'd have to say I did take off one time out of Addison in Dallas with a 22kt crosswind gusting to 35kts in a Diamond Katana. Runway 15, winds 220 at 22kts gusting to 35kts. (Max takeoff I think is around 1500lbs) I was feeling kind of leary about taking off, but made the decision to go. Looking back I should have never taken off. Off we go. As soon as I lifted off, I found myself in a 45 degree right crab to maintain runway centerline, climbing out at 55kts. My ground speed I'd have to say was in the 30s or 20s. Of course I decided I needed to fly somewhere else (Redbird). Off to Redbird we go, over Love field at 2000ft, getting tossed around in the turbulence, the seat belts struggling to keep us in our seats. The landing was crappy even though at Redbird it was more down the runway, since the turbulence was so bad I decided to fly back to Addison and shut down and call it a day.I had to keep the base leg close - inside the approach lights because my groundspeed was so slow, and turned final on to Rwy 15 and found myself in a 45 degree crab to the right again. In order to look down the runway I have to turn my head to the left and look over the leading edge of the left wing. My nose is pointed at the tower. They clear me to land and I had to imagine the tower guys are thinking that this pilot is crazy just for being in the air. The Katana is still getting tossed around. I decide to hold the 45 degree crab almost all the way to the ground because after turning to final I tried side sliping to compensate for the gusty crosswinds and I found I couldn't track the runway, I kept getting blown to the left even with right aileron and full left rudder deflection. Just before I'm about to crash into the ground, I flared, kicked the aircraft into a slip to lineup with the centerline and did the softest landing I ever did, even though I really only wanted to just get on the ground, I wasn't trying for a greaser, I didn't care how hard I touched down. But I end up with the touchdown I wish I did on my checkride with an examiner. Only until I got back to parking and tied the aircraft down did I start breathing again.My wife (who hates flying) told me after we touched down. "You know your first landing at Redbird sucked. But this one was pretty good. I don't know much about flying but your second landing was really really good." I didn't have the heart to tell her that I didn't think we were going to get back to Addison without crashing.Anyways enough ramblingWoodreau / KMVL

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Is it possible you were hearing them start the rest of the engines after backing away from the jetway?

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There are three simple rules for making a smooth landing. Unfortunately nobody knows what they are.:-lol :-lol :-lol'nuff said

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I have a friend who is a United Airlines 777-2XX captain who says that they don't spool up very much (40% N1 or so) with the brakes on before the takeoff run like one may in other jets. The reason? They'll suck debris from the runway into the engines and damage them.Yikes. That's some power.Kevin

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I have been to Manchester Airport in England and Edinburgh Airport in Scotland numerous times, and the ONLY aircraft types that I have seen spooling up to full power before releasing the brakes are the Fokker 70/100.Chris Low.

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Hi all..ill take a stab at both. As for the first question. All i can say is this. It for one depends on what type of plane you are flying. But this should work for most planes. On approach try to make all alignment and glide path corrections early. Always use small corrections. Stay on the approach speed. Once you are onspeed and the aircraft is trimmed for that speed, the rest is easy. And keep a good scan of speed, pitch and glide path and the rest is technique. Also know the procedures for that plane. Airspeed is key. My last flight i was with this one guy who would always get slow on final. He also would jockey the throttles around witch made things worse. Even in the vfr pattern he would descend way to late and end up diving toward the runway witch kills the speed control. Diving at the runway on final fast in a dc10 isnt pleasent. Watch your throttle control. its easy to get slow on final...push in to much power and end up too high....Remember speed is paramount. As for the engine runup on take-off. Its sorta like small prop planes but quicker. Most big jets dont do static max power take offs.We prefer rolling. In the rolling take-off we align with the runway.When ready we release the brakes and push to 45% witch is flight idle for us. This gives you the oppurtunity to align the throttles so that all engines are at the same percent and uniform. Also you can get a quick check to make sure all engines instruments are in normal range...At that point the pilot flying says set take-off power and the engineer does so. Even if we hold the brakes we release them before going above 45%. Ive only done 1 static take-off with power set prior to brake release. This would only help if performance is severe critical(if so you shouldnt take-off in the case). Most take off power charts are based on power set between 40 and 80 knots any way. If the winds are 45 degrees off the runway or at 23 knots we have to do a rolling because of our #2 engine stall risk. As for the push backs. Most heavies will wait till they are away from the terminal to start. Just imagine the thrust being push around if you pushed back with engines runnings in a 747. Objects, fod, and people would be blown over as you were being swung around. Even in the 10 and md11 the 2 engine is angled downward. We start that engine once out of the congested area unless we are over 530k(kc-10). rich

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