Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
BoeingFan88

PMDG Boeing 777

74 posts in this topic

Hi Guys,Just felt like weighing in on things here a bit. I fly the B777 and it will be worth the wait! The systems and automation are unbelievable. When explaining the aircraft to my friends, I tell it like this - 'if there's anything wrong with the aircraft it tells you whats wrong, and then it goes one step further and tells you what to do with it!'. Managing Non-normals in this baby is a breeze when you compare it to most other airliners in the sky. The centre of most Non-normal operations after identifing the problem on the EICAS is to run the electronic checklist - which come to think of it makes normal operations a breeze too!For those complaining about long haul flying etc...There's nothing stopping you from taking it and flying it to where ever you want on how ever short or long flight you want - thats the beauty of flight simulation isn't it! And for those who like to fly real world routes check out where airlines like Emirates, Etihad and Qatar send their Triplers. Some very short sectors where they level off at lower altitudes and slow down to allow the hosties to complete a meal service!I have a few photos of the B777 flight deck and aircraft which I would like to share if I'm permitted to and can resize the pictures.For what its' worth I am looking forward to getting my hands on the NGX when its' released - what an exciting product and an amazing sneak peak into what we have to look forward to in the future!Mitch Beck

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

if there's anything wrong with the aircraft it tells you whats wrong, and then it goes one step further and tells you what to do with it!
Unless you happen to be on Speedbird 38, in which case it doesn't. Then you have to reduce the flaps and cross your fingers. :( Al
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Unless you happen to be on Speedbird 38, in which case it doesn't. Then you have to reduce the flaps and cross your fingers. :( Al
You can't plan for everything in life can you! For anyone thats interested Flaps podcast did an interview with Peter Burkill (The captain of BA38) in their August 2010 episode; very interesting to hear a first hand account of what happened and reducing the flap setting gained an extra 50m or so and enabled them to clear the motorway. Also deals with the fallout he got within the company on a personal level.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pete Burkhill co-wrote (with his wife Maria) a pretty interesting book about that crash landing too (Thirty Seconds to Impact, published by AuthorHouse).Coincidentally I read that very book last weekend, it's a remarkably frank account of things. It's light on technical details until the final chapter, since it is aimed at the general reader, the final chapter covers the AAIB's investigation and findings. Worth a look if you are interested in that kind of thing, although keep in mind that the book is more about how his family dealt with negative press accusations and how he felt BA's PA department let him down a lot (in stark contrast to how Chesley Sullenburger was treated by US Air) rather than going over the minute details of the crash itself.What is interesting, is that he mentions how frustrating it was to be sat at home and see many pilots and non-pilots commenting on the matter on various online forums, which he was unable to respond to because BA had told him that he could not do so. Something we should all perhaps bear in mind whenever we feel inclined to pipe up about what we think caused this or that air accident, since he took a lot of completely undeserved flak at the time. Al

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pete Burkhill co-wrote (with his wife Maria) a pretty interesting book about that crash landing too (Thirty Seconds to Impact, published by AuthorHouse).Coincidentally I read that very book last weekend, it's a remarkably frank account of things. It's light on technical details until the final chapter, since it is aimed at the general reader, the final chapter covers the AAIB's investigation and findings. Worth a look if you are interested in that kind of thing, although keep in mind that the book is more about how his family dealt with negative press accusations and how he felt BA's PA department let him down a lot (in stark contrast to how Chesley Sullenburger was treated by US Air) rather than going over the minute details of the crash itself.What is interesting, is that he mentions how frustrating it was to be sat at home and see many pilots and non-pilots commenting on the matter on various online forums, which he was unable to respond to because BA had told him that he could not do so. Something we should all perhaps bear in mind whenever we feel inclined to pipe up about what we think caused this or that air accident, since he took a lot of completely undeserved flak at the time. Al
Can I plus 1 Al,I have a signed copy of that book just here, and although it doesn't go into deep technicals, it's one of the best things I have ever read, very very open and honest account.It even made me dislike BA managment... A lot/
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably worth pointing out that Pete Burkhill did actually come to terms with BA, to the extent that I believe he actually rejoined them after having initially left following his treatment. I think BA too learned a lot about how to deal with such things in light of how US Air dealt with their forced landing on the Hudson in a much more intelligent fashion with regard to giving the press what they wanted, thus stopping them from writing a load of nonsense.Al

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Probably worth pointing out that Pete Burkhill did actually come to terms with BA, to the extent that I believe he actually rejoined them after having initially left following his treatment. I think BA too learned a lot about how to deal with such things in light of how US Air dealt with their forced landing on the Hudson in a much more intelligent fashion with regard to giving the press what they wanted, thus stopping them from writing a load of nonsense.Al
I sympathise with him totally. I am forced to put up with armchair experts and the 20/20 hindsight committee in my job daily! The crew were bloody heroes!!!Will definately read his book now!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last thing I heard about the 737NGX was that VNAV was being tweaked.Would it be a safe bet to say this tweaking will be applied to the B777? And anything else learned while building the 737NGX, making a B777 MUCH closer to eventually being in our hands?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

assuming PMDG just started work on it, than I wouldent expect a 777 for at least 3 years, that and if they are working on a Dash 8 Q400 you won't hear from them for a long time once this masterpice of an aircraft the 737NGX is out.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one song that explains what the PMDG 777 would never be and the captain 777 ishttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn6HH4vmSRU

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
one song that explains what the PMDG 777 would never be and the captain 777 is
Yet another completely unnecessary bash at a different developer, particularly given the title of this thread. And people wonder why threads get locked.Al
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No Boeing 707 aircraft have been retrofitted with CFM or any other small high-bypass turbofan engines
One 707 was retrofitted with CFM56-2s in the late 1970s during the CFM56 flight test programme. Prior to this the engine had flown on a YC-15 (in the US) and a Caravelle (in France), but the 707 was the first aircraft to use the CFM56 as its sole powerplant. Boeing marketed the aircraft as the 707-700, but quickly pulled the plug on the programme as the 757 was right around the corner and there was little interest in the re-engined 707.CFM56-2 on the DC-8, 707 (E-3/E-6) and C-135 based (KC-135/RC-135) aircraft.CFM56-3 on the 737 ClassicCFM56-5 on the A320 family/A340-200/A340-300CFM56-7 on the 737NG
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thou art mistaken! The only of the three original american airliner designs (707, DC-8 and Convair 880) have been fitted with CFM high-bypass engines. The Douglas DC-8 was fitted with CFMs and was in service with these, with operators like Delta until the early 80s, late 70s. No Boeing 707 aircraft have been retrofitted with CFM or any other small high-bypass turbofan engines, with the KC-137 being an exception, as it isn't a true civilian 707, as is the topic at debate (plus the US Military can put whatever the hell the like on the planes, they've got the dough); a beleive at one point somebody tried, but never received FAA approval, or approval for an STC. Now, the 707 wouldn't be economically viable with CFM engines, as its short fuselage doesn't lend to much performance or efficieny gain over the original engines. The DC-8 however, was fitted with these, because the DC-8-70 and DC-8-80 had streched fuselages, lending to better efficiency with a CFM engine, as the larger aircraft goes, its economical, and the DC-8 is tougher and built better than the 707. The Convair 880 was made in small numbers, and to this day is the fastest subsonic airliner ever built.
You are mistaken, there is no such aricraft as the KC137. There was a Vc-137.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are mistaken, there is no such aricraft as the KC137. There was a Vc-137.
There is actually such a thing as a KC-137 - a tanker/transport for the Brazilian Air Force, but none have been re-engined with the CFM56. He was probably thinking of the KC-135, which itself is not based on the 707. Many hundreds of KC-135s have been reengined, with the new designation KC-135R and KC-135T.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0