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Those mysterious CWS buttons

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I have never used them neither I know what they are made for.I admit I didn't have completely read the manual but I can fly with no issue so I assume they are not fundamental.But you know, there is always to learn and after the basics now I am curious to know what those CWS buttons are meant for.When cruising I like to experiment and once I pressed one of them just to see what happened. It happened nothing, at least I didn't notice anything new.But there are 2 of them and the curiosity grows faster this way :(

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Control Wheel SteeringThe manuals PDFs are searchable wink.pngCTRL+F "CWS" or "Control Wheel Steering" and have fun with the read.

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It's called Control Wheel Steering. When activated it will hold the current attitude at the moment you are releasing the yoke. So when you're entering a bank (>6 degrees) and you let the yoke go then it will hold the bank angle for you, like an Airbus.As Kyle said, take a look in the FCOM's, they are fun to read! --> 4.20.8Kind regards,

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Flying with CWS is actually a lot of fun, I use it all the time. I use it sometimes when given clearence to intercept the localizer, as I can drop the roll mode into RWS, arm VOR/LOC, turn the plane on the intercept heading myself, and when the autoflight system is ready to take over, it will automatically take the plane out of CWS and back into full CMD roll mode. Same goes for intercepting altitude set on the MPC. It will not intercept a heading, but if you lower the bank to something like under 5 degrees, CWS will automatically level the wings. It is great to use for departures and arrivals I think, since you are flying the bird all by yourself, but want to still do a bit of hand flying, CWS lets you do that but still have the ability to do the other things you need to do, like man the radios, set up the FMS, things like that.Give CWS a try.

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It is great to use for departures and arrivals I think, since you are flying the bird all by yourself, but want to still do a bit of hand flying, CWS lets you do that but still have the ability to do the other things you need to do, like man the radios, set up the FMS, things like that.
Exactly. That's my main use for it.

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Flying with CWS is actually a lot of fun, I use it all the time. I use it sometimes when given clearence to intercept the localizer, as I can drop the roll mode into RWS, arm VOR/LOC, turn the plane on the intercept heading myself, and when the autoflight system is ready to take over, it will automatically take the plane out of CWS and back into full CMD roll mode. Same goes for intercepting altitude set on the MPC. It will not intercept a heading, but if you lower the bank to something like under 5 degrees, CWS will automatically level the wings. It is great to use for departures and arrivals I think, since you are flying the bird all by yourself, but want to still do a bit of hand flying, CWS lets you do that but still have the ability to do the other things you need to do, like man the radios, set up the FMS, things like that.Give CWS a try.
Wow, I'm impressed! I have been flying the NG for a number of years now (old Fs9 fan) and I must admit even though I' quite knowledgeable on the acft, I never cared to learn more about CWS. Since I didn't hear much of real world crews making use of it, I thought it was jusg another useless feature to be forgotten. Now I feel stupid yet enlightened! Thanks for the heads up, it looks like CWS will fit my hands-on flying needs perfectly. Definetely giving it a try tonight.

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I've used CWS more times unintentionally than intentionally, after a VNAV disconnect, for instance. It really isn't used much, RW. It certainly wouldn't be considered "hand flying."I think the only time it's really recommended us for severe turbulence.

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CWS P and CWS R are the default pitch and roll modes for the autopilot if no other modes are active when the autopilot is engaged.As Matt has said, it is not used very much in the RW.It is a good way for student pilots to learn how to follow the FD's guidance so is used a lot in training. ( in the simulator )Fred.

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CWS P and CWS R are the default pitch and roll modes for the autopilot if no other modes are active when the autopilot is engaged.As Matt has said, it is not used very much in the RW.It is a good way for student pilots to learn how to follow the FD's guidance so is used a lot in training. ( in the simulator )Fred.
I've never come across the technique of using the CWS for FD training. I think in the US, most pilots have several thousand hours before they'll fly a 737. I suppose it's a bit different if you're coming through an ab initio program.

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