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sunwocd

A Question of the Speed limit When at and below 10000ft

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Hello everyone: Recently I confused about a question......The Speed limit when at and below barometer 10000ft is 250kt for the aircraft,can this limit is permitted to modify by the pilot? For example, I want to use the limit in 240kt,how can I do the job? Is there any selection in the MCDU about this modfication? Thank you very much !Best regards!Stephen Sunwo3.23

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It's a maximum of 250 knots. If it was a requirement to go exactly 250 knots, I'd be screwed when I fly a 172 (max speed is 120 straight and level on a good day).In order to operate at a specific speed, use SPD INTV and dial it in that way (but it depends on your autopilot mode).You can also enter a restriction on the legs pages, but it's a lot easier to dial it in on the MCP.*Quick note about the 10/250 restriction:If your clean stall speed is higher than 250 knots (heavily-loaded 744s, as an example), you are permitted (in the US) to fly faster than that below 10,000'


Kyle Rodgers

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Yes, you could change the speed restriction in the MCDU. I think you set it on the VERT REF page of one of the waypoints above 10000 feet. Refere to the FMS guide FMS.30.7 or PDF page 61 for further informations.John


John Rubens
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As per our training manual all countries apart from the US ATC are permitted to remove the restriction of 250 below 10.

 

In the US it is only allowed for perfomance reasons as stated above.

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In the dc10, speed below 10,000ft was 250 or min maneuver which ever is the highest. Should be the same in all heavies. We didn't have to mention it or request it. They knew by aircraft type. I've done 350kts below 10,000ft in the KC-10A. We would do this to join the formation during a formation departure. Lead would fly min maneuver while the rest of the aircraft flew up to max, 350, to catch up. This limited the time ATC would have to deal with a long strung out block of airspace.

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Exactly.

 

That and controllers aren't the police of the skies. They'll certainly write up any issues where they know you broke an FAR if it affects the safety of other flights, but they're not hawkeyeing every flight to see their speeds/altitudes and so on. They can't see indicated airspeed anyway.


Kyle Rodgers

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Exactly.

 

That and controllers aren't the police of the skies. They'll certainly write up any issues where they know you broke an FAR if it affects the safety of other flights, but they're not hawkeyeing every flight to see their speeds/altitudes and so on. They can't see indicated airspeed anyway.

 

And then there was that awkward day on arrival into KATL when an approach controller said "Funny, your 250 seems a lot faster than everyone else's today." Crazy localized tailwinds!


Charles Carter

 

i5 750 OC'd to 3.6GHz - 8 GB RAM - nVidia GTS 250

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And then there was that awkward day on arrival into KATL when an approach controller said "Funny, your 250 seems a lot faster than everyone else's today." Crazy localized tailwinds!

 

haha - exactly.

That's how they figure it out.


Kyle Rodgers

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With many of the developing ATC systems they can see what you have selected.

 

They can see the route you have in the FMS, they can see the altitude you have dialed into the MCP...

 

If anyone wants to know.. I will dig over the information we got given about the various things they are able to see now and post it here.

 

But as one example that I remember of the top of my head....

 

When crossing the atlantic we used to enter in waypoints based on lat/long for things like the ETP or crew change over (in the case of having an extra pilot) if you do that today ATC will ask you to confirm your next waypoint as it is not part of your filed route... They are getting this from the ADS C. So of course the procedure now is to only enter the filed route into the FMS.

 

Other information is transmitted across the ADS B and the mode S transponder.. again ATC are starting to use these things.

 

In the US they are far behind on using it.. but in Europe almost all aircraft are ADS B now. The FAA are now pushing it out in the states, I think within Florida first?

 

Then the Canadians use it across a large area of their airspace, with ADS B/C and CPDLC we don't speak to anyone in Canada when doing a crossing.. Just get a message at the border telling us to contact the US controlers on 121.xxx makes for a nice working enviroment.. no missed calls from atc, a printed log of everything that we had been cleared to do.

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Controllers are being urged to be the police of the skies by the FAA

 

As part of a broad initiative begun five years ago to improve aviation’s “safety culture,” the FAA is encouraging air traffic controllers to report operational errors and mistakes without fear of punishment or reprisal. The change is leading to an increase in reported errors but, the agency says, a reduction in overall risk as well. The shift also means that the FAA is now more likely than ever to crack down on pilots who make mistakes.

The program is an extension of the Aviation Safety and Reporting System that has been available to pilots for years and Mandatory Occurrence Reporting, which was revamped by the FAA in January. To reduce the stigma attached to on-the-job mistakes by controllers, “operational errors” – for example, when a controller allows two airplanes to fly too closely – will now be known as “operational incidents.” In addition to encouraging reporting, the FAA has centralized the analysis of potential errors and changed how managers’ bonuses are computed, so that pay is no longer tied to reducing error totals, according to a report by Bloomberg News.

The FAA began the safety initiative in 2008 and has been expanding it ever since. The latest expansion includes the technicians who maintain radar installations and other equipment. While the change will most likely lead to safer skies in the long run, pilots need to be aware that serious errors they make that might have gone unreported in the past will almost certainly be reported now, possibly leading to certificate action.

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Very, very bad idea, in my opinion. The last thing you want is a lifesaving tool given a bad name because they're seen as the police of the skies.

 

Think of all the low time private pilots who will go under because they refused to contact ATC for help for fear of reprisal... 50-300 hours are already deadly enough.


Kyle Rodgers

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Depends what they do with the information...

 

I'm sure you have to do something pretty serious to have them start certificate action....

 

However, our company has more TCAS RA's in the US than anywhere else in the world. That is the cost of the fredom the US airspace system allows, a guy in a C150 to get up close and personal with a heavy!

 

Dennis

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As per our training manual all countries apart from the US ATC are permitted to remove the restriction of 250 below 10.

 

In the US it is only allowed for perfomance reasons as stated above.

 

On climbout to 100 its MMS (clean) or 250 whichever is greater. The 11 needs more speed than the 744, don't know about the 777.

 

Billy Bluestar


I Earned My Spurs in Vietnam

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I'm sure you have to do something pretty serious to have them start certificate action....

 

Define serious. Therein lies the problem.


Kyle Rodgers

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