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Alec

Any tips for someone with AirSickness?

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I started flying when I was 19 years old, stopped, then come back again at 20, stopped again, I was flying like 2 hours a month, 3 tops, so I was feeling very disappointed about my progress

 

I can tell you Alec... from my own experience as a student and instructor... I would not fly less than twice per week if at all possible. Once a week was typical for the students where I instructed... but I felt even a week was a long time between lessons for exactly the reason you cite... having to correct or re-learn things from previous lessons. I hated having to re-teach something... not because of the "re-teaching"... but I wanted the student to progress as fast as possible for their ability, so they could see the progress they were making, and not "waste" time / money.

 

I know it can be tough getting a couple lessons in a week... time and money seem always to be issues. But if at all possible...

 

I should mention I did my PPL at a university during the summer session. Nothing but ground school (morning) and flying (afternoon) Mon -Fri and probably some Saturdays. Had my PPL after 50 hours... took another 30 - 40 hours or so before I actually "felt like" a Private Pilot.

 

The oil smell is specific to the airplane I fly, the Brazilian made T-23 Uirapuru.

 

Aha... ok...

 

Very :dirol: (cool) plane btw.

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I must be the exception to the rule then . I actually like a little turbulent air as it gives me more confidence in my control of the plane. I stress the word "little" though. I made an approach recently in an 15 knot crosswind component, had a major bump at at about 400ft. Instructor had to take over as approach became un-stabilized...very sobering.


Anthony O'Brien

 

 

CA_2a_70.jpg

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So guys, time for an update!

 

Well, I'm glad I can tell you the issue has not happened again since the first flight!! It's been two flights total, I never felt that horrible stomach pain that made me want to stop flying and get back to the ground! I'm very VERY glad this stopped happening.

 

Well, I won't say I don't feel Motion Sickness anymore because by the end of the one hour flight I'm feeling somehow strange, nothing that ruins the experience, but I'm sure not ready for a three hour flight yet, it will take some time. And, it seems I was terrible unlucky that the first flight had the worse air instability condition of the three flights so far, today's flight seemed like FS atmosphere, I could take my hand of the yoke and the aircraft would stay in the trimmed position all day long, it's an extreme pleasure to feel the aircraft without interference from turbulence, we did ground based maneuvers, steep turn, sideslip, and I'm feeling more confident about the airplane after each flight. I even did some stalls! I used to not like this maneuver, since I didn't feel I was in control of the airplane, I felt as a passenger of the airplane. Not that I feel more confident I actually liked doing Stalls. It's really nice been able to look to the tacometer in the middle of the steep turn to check the RPM when you're doing some positive Gs and not feel your stomach.

 

I have yet to get tested again in a day with turbulence during the entire flight, I believe I will feel bad again, but that's something that's not up to me, and I'll do my best to keep the concentration and continue my flight until I get back to the ground, and look forward for the next one the following day.

 

You've been very helpful to me with tips and encouragement words. Thank you very much guys! Hope I can soon get to be a pilot like most of you have become, it's not an easy path to follow, there's several challenges, and so far this has been my toughest one.


Alexis Mefano

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Glad to hear this Alec...

 

Another thing you might try is scheduling (if at all possible) shortly after sunrise... quite fun to fly then (because of some nice sunrises) and many times the air will be "smooth as glass" (no turbulence)... heating of the day hasn't had a chance to take place and create the kind of turbulence those nutty glider pilots love.

 

It's really nice been able to look to the tacometer in the middle of the steep turn

 

"Letterman... seeing the missing letter and the problem it has caused...

 

 

 

Takes the letter "h" from his shirt... and... with quick application...

 

 

 

is able to restore the proper instrument to Alec's panel."

 

(sry Alec to tease you... looking forward to you teasing me as my spelling / grammar leaves something to be desired.)

 

This is the "real" Letterman btw...

 

 

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LOL!!

 

Yeah... I should have checked that before writing, damn Google!! In Portuguese we don't use the H so that's what caused the confusion =p

 

I'm not a huge fan of waking up too early, but I think it will be nice to get back from flying in time for lunch, that almost never happened so far.

 

Today's flight was really good, the one thing I need to improve now is landing, but I guess that comes with experience.


Alexis Mefano

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Yeah... I should have checked that before writing, damn Google!!

:LMAO:

 

Of course just kidding you... your english is impressive.

 

I didn't realize that about Portuguese and the "h"... all I know is it's a hard language and forget about anyone who knows Spanish trying to help interpret. :Big Grin: I had a class where we did a report about Bird Strikes in Brazil and the effort being made to reduce the number of incidents... our group worked a Lt. Col. in the Brazilian Air Force who works at CENIPA. Fortunately his english was excellent as translation here very expensive.

 

Yep... landing well comes from experience and familiarity with the plane... taking into account the various factors involved. Your determination will see you through that. Always keep those eyes moving (do not let them ever get fixated on one point) and work, work, work throughout the approach / roundout - flare. Keep thinking / compensating all the way through.

 

Glad to hear things working well... remember not to get too bent out of shape if things do not go well one day or another. Training has its ups and downs (in more ways than one!).

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Thank you!

 

Yes, Portuguese is a very complex language compared to English, I have no idea how I learned it until today, I always got bad grades in class...

 

We have a lot of birds here, nice to know CENIPA is looking into reducing the risks to Brazilian aircrafts. Must have been quite a report.

 

I'm sure there will be difficulties ahead with my training, there always are!! But I will try my best not to let that slow my progress and look forward to correcting that next time I'm in the air. Thanks again for the encouraging words. I will post some photos as soon as I have time in flight to take them for you guys to take a look


Alexis Mefano

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'I didn't realize that about Portuguese and the "h" . . . '

 

The letter 'h' certainly exists in the Portuguese alphabet (e.g. "chover" -- "to rain" or "chá" -- "tea"). I guess it's just not there in 'tacometer'.

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Perfect observation, of course we have the letter H! It's not in the word "Tacômetro"


Alexis Mefano

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Perfect observation, of course we have the letter H! It's not in the word "Tacômetro"

Indeed! I'm struggling with learning the language at the moment as we're planning to relocate to Portugal next year. It can be a tricky language (as Portuguese people keep telling me, usually in perfect English!); but to be honest, I find that the hard part is understanding when hearing it spoken.

 

Brazilian spoken Portuguese is, I find, more easily understood than the European version.

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Indeed! I'm struggling with learning the language at the moment as we're planning to relocate to Portugal next year. It can be a tricky language (as Portuguese people keep telling me, usually in perfect English!); but to be honest, I find that the hard part is understanding when hearing it spoken.

 

Brazilian spoken Portuguese is, I find, more easily understood than the European version.

 

I can barely understand things spoken in Portuguese from Portugal, very different pronunciation. Well good luck with that! It's indeed a hard language, I haven't learned Spanish because it's as complex as Portuguese, and knowing one complex language is enough for me...

 

I suggest watching lots of Portuguese TV, watching their news channel if you have access to any, downloading some Portuguese famous TV Program. If you wanted Brazilian Portuguese I'd tell you to watch Globo Internacional channel, which I'm pretty sure it's all over the world nowadays, but since that's won't prepare you much for Portugal, I don't know if it's a great idea.


Alexis Mefano

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Once you start flying, the air sickness should go away. It's the same thing with motion sickness in a car. You don't feel it when you drive.


Kevin Hester,

 

Indianapolis, Indiana

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