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Guest gasebah

Icing gauge

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Guest gasebah

There was some talk about an icing gauge in the ActiveSky forum a while ago. Anyone knows if something like that exists? Or is some wizard able to do one? My deepest gratefulness would be assured.Alex

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Guest Paragon

If you are looking for a readout on how much icing on your aircraft, you can use the AFSD program to tell you how many Kg ice is on your plane.

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Guest gasebah

Yeah Mikkel,I know that. But AFSD only works outside of FS. I would love to have something inside the aircraft that I can ou in a panel.Alex

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I have a few that came from various twin-prop to jet panels. I add them using FS Panel Studio. Some work well and others seem to have problems.What is more important perhaps is that you add an OAT (outside air temperature gauge) if you do not already have a readout on one of your other instruments. This will enable you to commence anti-ice prevention in conditions that favor it where the anti-ice techjnique is chemical or heat inducing for structural icing. Those de-icing methods that use vibrating boots would only be activated after ice is formed by basicly shattering the formed ice.There are four icing conditions to consider. Engine and prop deicing for turbine aircraft. Pitot Tube deicing. Structural Deicing. Carburator heat deicing.Each requires a different technique and time of application. Generally an ice gauge refers to structural icing conditions and there are some panels with the caution "engine deicing not enabled" for turbine powered aircraft.Pitot heat is applied when conditions of high humidity and an OAT of 10 degrees C or lower might cause ice to block the tube input. This is a condition observed when your air speed indicator suddenly drops to zero. It can happen when passing through clouds.For carb equipped engines, the placement of the carb (over or under the engine) in reduced power conditions as well as weather conditions determine when carb heat is applied. It does not take much moisture at all to cause carb icing so in usually some light aircraft it is routinely applied when reduced power occurs during landing. As the humidity becomes more prevalent it would be applied on descents and pattern operations other than take-off when max power is required. It routinely can be applied intermittently when required in descent or in the pattern to clear out any ice that may have formed but not enough to have caused aspiration disruption. Note that there is a slight loss of power on applying carb heat.Ice prevention methods using heat from bleed air systems may reduce engine output power so while used as a precaution there are some situations where you would not have it enabled "frivolously". It depends upon the aircraft type and reserve power available.

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The icing alarms I have came from jet panels in most cases. One came from a 747-400DFD panel but don't recall the actual panel.

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Guest gasebah

Thx Ronzie. I found that one. I'll check it out. Alex

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