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vpiragibe

No TRK or Heading Hold on Take Off , airborne below 400 feet

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Is my rig faulty or somebody else having the same problem?

 

Pity we dont have the 80 kt , VR and positive climb call outs...

 

Still waiting for the SDK and a 2D front and overhead panels to be launched.

 

Cheers

 

Vicente

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When you are below 400ft, you can't engage the autopilot.

 

You can also enable VR and V2 call outs within the options in the CDU (I can't remember exactly where as I'm not at my FSX PC right now)

 

Hope that helps,

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1. Read the manual.

2. You'll be waiting for a VERY long time for those 2D panels, as they won't ever come.

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2. You'll be waiting for a VERY long time for those 2D panels, as they won't ever come.

 

There is a push for community made 2D panels, initiated by some volunteers who would like to make them...

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Not sure they'll allow it. If they don't even allow a texture update for one of their "out of support", addons, why would they allow an addon that's a lot more complicated, for their top of the range plane?

(Not saying I wouldn't like to see the nagging stop, though...)

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In the RW, the ROLL mode  ( Heading or Track select ) CAN be selected below 400 feet.

 

I wish PMDG corrects this in the next update.

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Can be armed before takeoff isn't the same thing as "can be selected (as an active mode) between 2ft and 400ft"

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Can be armed before takeoff isn't the same thing as "can be selected (as an active mode) between 2ft and 400ft"

 

Bingo.

 

There is a reason these things are inhibited between certain altitudes on climb out - it is in part to prevent the crew getting distracted at very low altitude trying to engage the autopilot, sinking, and crashing into something (tower/building/mountain/ground).

 

Personally I'm not mentally ready to do a thing until the aircraft is climbing through about 1000 ft, sometimes much more. I'd rather be flying when I lose an engine (or worse) than having to suddenly take over from Otto when the SHTF.

 

There are no points for the earliest possible engagement of the autopilot. Learn to love hand-flying. Too many crashes are now occurring in the real-world because pilots can't fly the damn aircraft. Modern airliners are easier to fly than Cessnas. There is no excuse.

 

Best regards,

Robin.

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In the RW, the ROLL mode  ( Heading or Track select ) CAN be selected below 400 feet.

 

I wish PMDG corrects this in the next update.

Perhaps you wish this new feature to be added to the Boeing product before PMDG add it to theirs?

 

Select the mode armed before you line up on the runway.

 

Once you hit that TOGA button to takeoff thrust, you cannot arm stuff till you are above 400ft, you will be in TOGA mode (runway heading, takeoff thrust, rotate attitude on Flight Director, Autopilot off).

 

After 400ft the Flight director will switch to the things that were armed, be they LNAV/VNAV or some other mode. Of course you can change modes after 400ft too. From takeoff thrust set to 400ft though, the armed modes will be "armed" but not "Active" till the takeoff stuff is done.

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Greetings, keep in mind that when IFR(FAA), the aircraft has to climb straight ahead to 400ft amongst other things on departure. You don't want the aircraft turning below 400ft after departure as this is your obstruction clearance area. That's why the modes engage afterward.

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Also a real world tip to the topic starter. Be careful when arming LNAV on certain departures. Some departures have you take up a heading after takeoff while others have you take a track. LNAV armed when the departure gives a heading can lead to trouble. Here's an example. At this congested area airport I transit often, a departure has you perform a climbing left turn to a heading of 270. When departing with LNAV armed, the FMC leads the turn but the Flight mode engages after 400ft. This puts the aircraft off the depicted track. The flight director/Auto-pilot will turn past 270 to rejoin the depicted track. This deviates from the 270 procedure causing ATC to state "confirm heading 270" with in 5 seconds. The 270 heading keeps you clear of landing traffic at a neighboring busy airport. When the aircraft corrects back to course, the controller gets nervous.  My preference is to fly these type of departures in heading select. This way I get a nice turn to heading as I await vectors. Some guys will still arm LNAV and ignore the FD while hand flying. I prefer heading select as it's sometimes hard to ignore the FD. I prefer to turn the FD off when ever it isn't giving me good data for my current profile.

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Not sure they'll allow it. If they don't even allow a texture update for one of their "out of support", addons, why would they allow an addon that's a lot more complicated, for their top of the range plane?
(Not saying I wouldn't like to see the nagging stop, though...)

 

Ryan has said that will happily allow it if it keeps within scopes of EULA and other applicable legal requirements, such as it won't use copyrighted artwork without permission.

 

I suppose they would actually like to have a customer-made update for the MD-11, but it's a legal hassle. If the EULA is written so that it does not allow that, I can see that lawyers would cosider allowing an EULA breach go uncontented unadvisable. Does set a precedent...

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I beg to disagree, gentlemen.

 

Let me give you an example: 

A normal departure TO mode ( THR REF / TOGA / TOGA ) with LNAV and VNAV armed. This is the standard set for all airlines. Max use of automation.

You are very heavy, and the SID today ( that requires a steep climb gradient ) calls for a 90* turn at half a mile after the opposite runway threshold . All set in LEGs page.

During the TO roll, at VR, BANG! you have an engine failure.

At 50' the Roll mode engages automatically to LNAV. ( another example of roll mode changing below 400 feet )

Luckily, the terrain ahead of the runway is flat as a pancake.

At the 1/2 mile position, the LNAV will call you to turn, but the plane is still below 400 feet ( you are heavy, remember? ) , and you want to continue straight ahead and not follow the SID anymore.

You have 2 options :

1 ) before the 1/2 mile position, select TOGA again, get rid of LNAV and VNAV ,holding the track you have when pushing the TOGA button ( roughly runway track, what is good as you want to continue straight ahead. ) However, you gonna miss the VNAV mode at 400 feet. No big deal, as you can reselect VNAV at or above 400 feet and have the aircraft accelerating to the speed bug at the engine auto acceleration height ( Take off REF page 2/2 ) futher retracting your flaps and so on...

2 ) before the 1/2 mile position and still below 400 feet, select TRACK SEL. This way you get THR REF / TRK SEL / TOGA ( with VNAV armed ) until 400 feet. As the track selector is normally set to the runway alignment, you going to have the desired track when airborne, not a turn on LNAV, plus the benefits of VNAV at 400 feet.

 

Mr. hopskip, for your info this is not my desire. This is how it works in the RW.  Real Boeing 777.

 

Mr. 3-2-1 now, auto pilot engagement is necessary as soon as the aircraft is in trim and above 200 feet AGL. If you have an engine fire, you need to confirm every movement of your partner ( Pilot not flying ) during the execution of the memory items. If you wait until the plane is above 1000 feet to start your actions you are doomed !  Heavy birds are far different from a Cessna.  Autopilot is your friend ( when you know how to use it ) not your enemy...

 

PMDG, please, review this feature in your next update.

 

Vpira

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I beg to disagree, gentlemen.

 

Let me give you an example: 

A normal departure TO mode ( THR REF / TOGA / TOGA ) with LNAV and VNAV armed. This is the standard set for all airlines. Max use of automation.

You are very heavy, and the SID today ( that requires a steep climb gradient ) calls for a 90* turn at half a mile after the opposite runway threshold . All set in LEGs page.

During the TO roll, at VR, BANG! you have an engine failure.

At 50' the Roll mode engages automatically to LNAV. ( another example of roll mode changing below 400 feet )

Luckily, the terrain ahead of the runway is flat as a pancake.

At the 1/2 mile position, the LNAV will call you to turn, but the plane is still below 400 feet ( you are heavy, remember? ) , and you want to continue straight ahead and not follow the SID anymore.

You have 2 options :

1 ) before the 1/2 mile position, select TOGA again, get rid of LNAV and VNAV ,holding the track you have when pushing the TOGA button ( roughly runway track, what is good as you want to continue straight ahead. ) However, you gonna miss the VNAV mode at 400 feet. No big deal, as you can reselect VNAV at or above 400 feet and have the aircraft accelerating to the speed bug at the engine auto acceleration height ( Take off REF page 2/2 ) futher retracting your flaps and so on...

2 ) before the 1/2 mile position and still below 400 feet, select TRACK SEL. This way you get THR REF / TRK SEL / TOGA ( with VNAV armed ) until 400 feet. As the track selector is normally set to the runway alignment, you going to have the desired track when airborne, not a turn on LNAV, plus the benefits of VNAV at 400 feet.

 

Mr. hopskip, for your info this is not my desire. This is how it works in the RW.  Real Boeing 777.

 

Mr. 3-2-1 now, auto pilot engagement is necessary as soon as the aircraft is in trim and above 200 feet AGL. If you have an engine fire, you need to confirm every movement of your partner ( Pilot not flying ) during the execution of the memory items. If you wait until the plane is above 1000 feet to start your actions you are doomed !  Heavy birds are far different from a Cessna.  Autopilot is your friend ( when you know how to use it ) not your enemy...

 

PMDG, please, review this feature in your next update.

 

Vpira

Take a look at the regs that govern flight in the country you reside and have a look at departure procedures. For my area, it would be the AIM and FAR part 25. A good read and you would understand. I am a real world guy with experience in heavy and biz aircraft. Also remember, you have to prove that you can make the SID engine out. Takeoffs are based on engine out performance. On a IFR departure, you will have to follow the SID or a company specific governing body approved engine out procedure. We call these SDPs (single engine departures). At certain airfields, we pay to have these developed and approved so that we can depart at heavier gross weights when we are limited by performance. We brief both procedures before takeoff. Here is some Info from my regs.

 

1. Unless specified otherwise, required obstacle clearance for all departures, including diverse, is based on the pilot crossing the departure end of the runway at least 35 feet above the departure end of runway elevation, climbing to 400 feet above the departure end of runway elevation before making the initial turn, and maintaining a minimum climb gradient of 200 feet per nautical mile (FPNM), unless required to level off by a crossing restriction, until the minimum IFR altitude. A greater climb gradient may be specified in the DP to clear obstacles or to achieve an ATC crossing restriction. If an initial turn higher than 400 feet above the departure end of runway elevation is specified in the DP, the turn should be commenced at the higher altitude. If a turn is specified at a fix, the turn must be made at that fix. Fixes may have minimum and/or maximum crossing altitudes that must be adhered to prior to passing the fix. In rare instances, obstacles that exist on the extended runway centerline may make an "early turn" more desirable than proceeding straight ahead. In these cases, the published departure instructions will include the language "turn left(right) as soon as practicable." These departures will also include a ceiling and visibility minimum of at least 300 and 1. Pilots encountering one of these DPs should preplan the climb out to gain altitude and begin the turn as quickly as possible within the bounds of safe operating practices and operating limitations. This type of departure procedure is being phased out.

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