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Haza

Iv just noticed a very cool thing on the 777

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So set the scene, just arrived at EGNT from CYVR with ATIS saying 220 @ 21knts.... landed fine, all hydraulic panel shut down, etc checklist complete, time for a coffee.

 

So walk around the aircraft to see GSX @ work too notice the rudder moving on its own accord with the wind, how realistic is that! I had a look at the wind sock and the rudder and windsock were moving together.... I made sure it was nothing to do with me or my yoke.

 

Its little features (I am hoping it is and not a bug) that makes the 777 so brilliantly realistic! Thank you very much PMDG. Little things like this gets me going and I'm a real pilot.

 

Sorry if this has been brought up but go have a look!

 

Regards,

 

H


Henry Melrose

 

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Leonardo da Vinci

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I doubt this is modeled since it would take a pretty strong wind to start moving the rudder, certainly something higher than 20 kts since the rudder a heavy piece of kit.

But interesting observation. 


Cheers,

Bruce Campion-Smith

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I doubt this is modeled since it would take a pretty strong wind to start moving the rudder, certainly something higher than 20 kts since the rudder a heavy piece of kit.

But interesting observation. 

 

That was my opinion too at first.


Henry Melrose

 

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Leonardo da Vinci

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yep i noticed it long time ago, its cool. when you turn the hydraulics off, flaperons and aelierons also fall. these are all good but the bug is the elevators, they dont go down, dont know why.


EREK CAGRI KARTAL

 

 

 

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I doubt this is modeled since it would take a pretty strong wind to start moving the rudder, certainly something higher than 20 kts since the rudder a heavy piece of kit.

But interesting observation. 

 

Doesn't take too much to move, think about the surface area of the rudder.


Tom Bergman | Founder - Hemisphere Virtual Airlines | www.hphvirtual.com

"I just wanna tell you both: good luck. We're all counting on you."
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Pretty much every major addon going back to FS9 does this. Real world it takes very little wind to move the rudder without hydraulic pressure, same with the fan blades, a light breeze will get them spinning.

 

Anyway I agree, those nice touches add that extra realism to the sim world.

yep i noticed it long time ago, its cool. when you turn the hydraulics off, flaperons and aelierons also fall. these are all good but the bug is the elevators, they dont go down, dont know why.

it's not a bug, the real 777 traps pressure in the elevators unlike most other types of airliners.

 

regards


Rob Prest

 

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@Haza: Yes it definitely is modeled - I had noticed that feature too ... and have just checked it out again.  Quite brilliant attention to detail by PMDG!

 

@Flex1978:  I had also noticed the elevators do not droop and did not know why - thanks for the explanation!  Another example of PMDG's accuracy and attention to detail!!


Cheers,  Brian L Robinson

Flight Simmer since 1983 - loving the brilliant Quality Wings 787 and all PMDG models!!

 

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it's not a bug, the real 777 traps pressure in the elevators unlike most other types of airliners.

 

regards

 

got it, thanks for the clarification.


EREK CAGRI KARTAL

 

 

 

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I wonder why they didn't make the ailerons trap pressure as well, seems it would help with clearance on the ramp during loading etc. One less thing sticking out to crash into.


Wes Meyer

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Does it bring people some kind of pleasure to point out that something is a bug?  I always wonder that with how much the term is thrown around with little to no actual knowledge supporting the claim.

 

"The ailerons on the A2A Cessna don't droop when I turn the plane off like the other planes I own!!!  BUG!!!"

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

 


I wonder why they didn't make the ailerons trap pressure as well, seems it would help with clearance on the ramp during loading etc. One less thing sticking out to crash into.

 

Most ground service providers require you to avoid driving close to the aircraft in general, and only allow certain activities into that zone (jetbridges, cargo/baggage loading/unloading, portable GPUs/airstarts/low press air, lav trucks, and so on).  You shouldn't be anywhere near the ailerons to be at risk of hitting them, drooped or not.


Kyle Rodgers

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"The ailerons on the A2A Cessna don't droop when I turn the plane off like the other planes I own!!!  BUG!!!"

 

 

 

 

Ha! They droop one side depending on yoke position!


Henry Melrose

 

"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Leonardo da Vinci

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Does it bring people some kind of pleasure to point out that something is a bug?  I always wonder that with how much the term is thrown around with little to no actual knowledge supporting the claim.

 

"The ailerons on the A2A Cessna don't droop when I turn the plane off like the other planes I own!!!  BUG!!!"

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

Most ground service providers require you to avoid driving close to the aircraft in general, and only allow certain activities into that zone (jetbridges, cargo/baggage loading/unloading, portable GPUs/airstarts/low press air, lav trucks, and so on).  You shouldn't be anywhere near the ailerons to be at risk of hitting them, drooped or not.

 

 

I realize this, unfortunately the plethora of incidents of this type show that it happens more often than the airlines would like. I just thought if it was easy enough to do, it would make things just that bit safer.

 

A better question would be, do the elevators trap pressure by design or as an unintended consequence of some other system, and if by design, for what reason?


Wes Meyer

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The elevators trap pressure to prevent flutter in flight when there are certain hydraulic failure. I haven't tried it but you can make them droop down by holding forward elevator beyond a certain amount of degrees before until the hydraulic completely depressurizes.


Bryan Richards

 

"People depend so much on automation that they forget how to get the automation to work." B.W.

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