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What's meant by "Using another Country's Airspace?"

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Hello, Guys!

 

What's Using another Country's Airspace? What are the terms and conditions, by following those, a Country's Aircraft use another Country's Airspace?

 

Regards,

 

AP

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Hi AP, nice to see you around again!

 

I can't really answer your second question, as that might also vary from country to country, but as for the first one: Using another country's airspace is basically your airplane (with the registration of country XY) flying in the airspace (i.e. the air above a country) of country AB, so you are flying over another country.

There will, in most cases, be some minimum requirements your aircraft has to meet in order to be granted permission to do so.

 

Best regards,

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Hi AP, nice to see you around again!

 

I can't really answer your second question, as that might also vary from country to country, but as for the first one: Using another country's airspace is basically your airplane (with the registration of country XY) flying in the airspace (i.e. the air above a country) of country AB, so you are flying over another country.

There will, in most cases, be some minimum requirements your aircraft has to meet in order to be granted permission to do so.

 

Best regards,

 

Thanks FloG!

 

OK I understand that if we are flying our Aircraft over a Country then it's called using other Country's Airspace. But I've listened Countries take money from other Countries whom Aircrafts go over them?

 

Suppose, recently, Turkmenistan asked Pakistan to pay their dues because Pakistan used Turkmenistan's Airspace to go to Europe and US. So what do you think all Countries do like that?

 

About Airspace, Countries take money to fly over their full area or just from only one or two Airports' Airspace?

 

Regards,

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Suppose, recently, Turkmenistan asked Pakistan to pay their dues because Pakistan used Turkmenistan's Airspace to go to Europe and US. So what do you think all Countries do like that?

 

Yes, countries* effectively "bill" airlines for use of their air traffic facilities.

 

(If you watch the "777 Arctic" DVD by Just Planes, they discuss how expensive flying through Russian airspace is.   I think, from memory, the total air traffic costs for one Toronto to Hong Kong flight, come to around $7,000)

 

*But it's not each country billing or charging another country.  It's each aerospace provider, billing each airline or operator for using it's airspace and air traffic control resources.

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Yes, countries* effectively "bill" airlines for use of their air traffic facilities.

 

(If you watch the "777 Arctic" DVD by Just Planes, they discuss how expensive flying through Russian airspace is.   I think, from memory, the total air traffic costs for one Toronto to Hong Kong flight, come to around $7,000)

 

*But it's not each country billing or charging another country.  It's each aerospace provider, billing each airline or operator for using it's airspace and air traffic control resources.

Precisely. At my former airline (COA/UAL), we had a complete department to monitor accounting/billing of what is referred to as "overflight charges". Often, cost/benefit scenarios are considered. For example, a KORD-VHHH flight could save close to one hour flight time utilizing Russian airspace. The cost/benefit is compared between fuel/time savings vs. Russian overflight charges. By the way, this example may be off the table considering U.S./European sanctions.

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Yes, countries* effectively "bill" airlines for use of their air traffic facilities.

(If you watch the "777 Arctic" DVD by Just Planes, they discuss how expensive flying through Russian airspace is.   I think, from memory, the total air traffic costs for one Toronto to Hong Kong flight, come to around $7,000)

*But it's not each country billing or charging another country.  It's each aerospace provider, billing each airline or operator for using it's airspace and air traffic control resources.

 

Oh my bad dream. But one thing which I've problem in. Are these costs to enter in a Country or only its Airport AirSpace only?

 

Example:

Air_Space.jpg

 

Look at this image. The Pink circle is an Airspace of an Airport. If plane flies over Airport Airspace like Red line in image then I know it'll cost. If Aircraft flies outside Airport space and cross the Country like green image then will it cost too?


 

 


Precisely. At my former airline (COA/UAL), we had a complete department to monitor accounting/billing of what is referred to as "overflight charges". Often, cost/benefit scenarios are considered. For example, a KORD-VHHH flight could save close to one hour flight time utilizing Russian airspace. The cost/benefit is compared between fuel/time savings vs. Russian overflight charges. By the way, this example may be off the table considering U.S./European sanctions.

 

Sir, your airline with the name UAL... flies over Pakistan daily and I see. So do you know that UAL gives money to Pakistan to fly over? and If YES then how much money Pakistan takes?

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Are these costs to enter in a Country or only its Airport AirSpace only?

Once you are en-route in a flight, you won't be handled by individual terminal areas (eg... airports), you'll be handled by 'centres'  ('centers in US English), which cover large geographic areas.

 

Each of these areas usually corresponds to a country, but not always.   For example, "Eurocontrol" in central Europe, controls air traffic within areas of German, France and Switzerland, I believe.

 

So let's take the example of a BA flight from Heathrow to Amsterdam.    The flight will incur overflight charges relating to it's handling at Heathrow, then the London Centre area, then the Dutch area centre, then finally the Amsterdam Terminal Zone (Approach, Tower, etc).

 

They don't pay costs for airports they overfly en-route.    Just the airports they originate and arrive at, and the airspace areas en-route. 

 

 

So do you know that UAL gives money to Pakistan to fly over? and If YES then how much money Pakistan takes?

Not to Pakistan (as in the country).   The charges go to the Air Traffic Organisation or entity within Pakistan (which may or may not be part of the state, or an independent agency).

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Once you are en-route in a flight, you won't be handled by individual terminal areas (eg... airports), you'll be handled by 'centres'  ('centers in US English), which cover large geographic areas.

 

Each of these areas usually corresponds to a country, but not always.   For example, "Eurocontrol" in central Europe, controls air traffic within areas of German, France and Switzerland, I believe.

 

So let's take the example of a BA flight from Heathrow to Amsterdam.    The flight will incur overflight charges relating to it's handling at Heathrow, then the London Centre area, then the Dutch area centre, then finally the Amsterdam Terminal Zone (Approach, Tower, etc).

 

They don't pay costs for airports they overfly en-route.    Just the airports they originate and arrive at, and the airspace areas en-route. 

 

 

 

Not to Pakistan (as in the country).   The charges go to the Air Traffic Organisation or entity within Pakistan (which may or may not be part of the state, or an independent agency).

Yes, usually referred to as ANSP (Air Navigation Service Provider). Mr Autopilot:  It would be completely unfair and inappropriate of me to quote charges or rates for a variety of reasons.

 

Kind Regards - Les Parson

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