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Manny

Good Cessna 150 or 172 FS 9 model to practice in for pilot in training

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Guest CowlFlapsOpen

I asked a similar question some weeks back. I have the F1 172 and the realair 172. Folks were somewhat divided, but both were strongly endorsed. I've stuck with the RA 172 for the most part. However, I replaced the basic gauges with those from RealityXP (their T-line group) for closer-to real-behavior and visual clarity. I disliked the panel compared to the F1 (the new gauges helped) but preferred the flight dynamics. Vision out of the RA was better.

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Guest thedoggg

I like the freeware Realair Cessna 172 but off course she is gonna fly the 150 so maybe the C-152 from Flight One would be better but I can't endorse it because I don't have that add on and can't comment on how realistic it is.Regards, Carlos

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Yep, FS will never beat the real thing! :) It was interesting to me what happened after I properly started to learn to fly. I found myself actually using flight sim more, I think it was because I had something to relate to. Before I sort of just went up for a buzz about without any real feeling of flying. Now having flown many times I can mentally picture what the situation would be like.. makes my flight simming more enjoyable anyway.I never really had the problem of separating between real life and flight sim, I accepted it was more of a tool than a simulation. Before even stepping in to the aircraft I had good/very good knowledge of all the instruments.. VORs and the ADF. Understood the reason of flaps.. carb heat, stuff like that. You just need to be careful about picking up any bad habits, I never had the problem of being transfixed on the instruments. But I did have some issues with flares, even though I think flight sim helped me get the perspective of the runway theres no height perception. I found myself flaring too early, to do a life like landing in FS using a training plane is nearly impossible.I think, as others have said here, used with real world flying FS is an excellent training aid.


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Hi,I've had the Flight1 152 for a few months now. 2 days ago I had my first flying lesson in a 152, it was like meeting up with an old friend! The only thing you don't get is the turbulence!Pete.

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Guest allcott

The interesting thing about the Flight 1 172 is that it also forms the basis for a genuine, real aviation training tool marketed separately.http://www.flight1tech.com/Allcott

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Guest thegut97

I have found that my students that use flight simulator before coming for instruction usually are far ahead of my other students that never touch it. I would suggest getting something like Jepp's Private Pilot manual and review things in the sim. However I would suggest against her trying flight maneuvers, because the sim does not give a good feel and my students become fixated on the instruments. I have one student that uses F1's 172 and he swears by it...plus he is one of my best students. One last thing cover up the VSI on the panel because every student that uses the sim use this to judge if they are changing altitude. Very BAD Habit! It is extremely inaccurate in a real plane and only gives a good reading after about nine seconds into a stable climb or descent.Hope you daughter has fun!David

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>One last thing cover up the VSI on>the panel because every student that uses the sim use this to>judge if they are changing altitude. Very BAD Habit! It is>extremely inaccurate in a real plane and only gives a good>reading after about nine seconds into a stable climb or>descent.>Hope you daughter has fun!>>DavidI can't agree with you more on this one.Jason


Jason

FAA CPL SEL MEL IR CFI-I MEI AGI

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To all who replied, I have been reading this thread with keen interest and thank sincerely all who posted these good insights.I will review with my daughter and probably try the Flight1 C 152, but with the cautions noted above!I will let her read this thread of course.Greg


Greg Clark

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Guest Knikolaes

Grats and good luck to your daughter on the world of flight.

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Jason,True to a great extent. But you can use it instead of chair flying to remember/ingrain procedures. You can also use it for x-country training.You can use it to learn about VOR and using Radios.And yes.. I had the nasty habit of looking at my instruments intead of looking outside. Thats only because I was using flight simulator for so long before I went for real flying. If I had started real flying and then use flight sim simeltaneously, I am not sure I would have developed the bad habit.The way I got over it was also interesting. For almost one week (I flew every day during that week), My Instructor covered up the entire panel. Yes.. Everything. Not even the Tach. And I had to fly and maintain my altitiude and do all my manoevers and land back without the benefit of any instrument. He wanted me to pay attention to the sound to determin my throttle settings. It was probably the best week of learning for me.Manny


Manny

Beta tester for SIMStarter 

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Guest av84fun

Hi Jason. <>This is a much debated subject and you are certainly entitled to your opinion...with which I agree in part and disagree in part.I agree that stall characteristics are not well modeled in most aircraft and since inadvertent stalls are such a killer ITRW, I agree that desktop simulation of them should be avoided.Beyond that though, I disagree with your statement that sims are only used for instrument training and so do nearly all of the major flight schools such as Embry-Riddle and American Flyers which use them heavily in the training environment.Sims can help A LOT with basic VFR guage interpretation such as VOR intercept and tracking, pattern work with cross winds, turn coordination assuming the student has rudder pedals, steep turns, chandelles and MANY other issues translate very well from the sim to the aircraft.Just my opinion.Regards,Jim

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Guest byoung

Unless your daughter has career ambitions to become a commercial pilot, I would look seriously at building a home cockpit with big screen projection, etc. You both can learn to fly, function as a flight crew, and simulate so many scenarios, you could not even get near in the real world. This could be a life long hobby for the both of you. Like most people, when you get married and have kids, your priorities change. Real world flying was the first to go for me. Flight simulation has really not just satisified my flight fix, but has moved me WAY beyond what I could realistically accomplish in real life. You will probably spend anywhere between 5-10K in flying lessons, just for PPL, for Instrument, much higher. And with the price of fuel rising like crazy, you may be priced out as well.I have learned more about flying here on AVSIM over the last several years, than I would EVER learn with an instructor, and for a much, much, smaller investment. And with the promises of FSX on the horizon, the future of flight simulation is extreamly bright (FS 2004 add-ons and scenery have more than exceeded industry expectations). The real world PPL and Instrument rated pilots may disagree. But if I was investing this amout of money, again, I would look at building a home cockpit. Some are pre-built, all you do is add the computers and monitors and other flight controller type hardware (Yokes, Pedals, switching panels, on and on and on).IN closing, there are many many people that have done this, some to an extravagent level. Maybe others will chime in here with sample Home Cockpit videos. Some I have seen are just remarkable. Check out the Home Cockpit forum here on AVSIM and post some threads requesting to see videos. You will be amazed.Just my 2 cents worth. I just wish I was in the same position as you and your daughter. It would be a no-brainer to invest in a home cockpit. Providing I could afford it :) Cheers!Barry

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>>Beyond that though, I disagree with your statement that sims>are only used for instrument training and so do nearly all of>the major flight schools such as Embry-Riddle and American>Flyers which use them heavily in the training environment.>Simulators are indeed used extensively in training. In fact many jet type ratings are earned in simulators instead of the real aircrafts. But for this topic (basic flight training) I was only talking about "desktop" sims. More like those Elite sims that local flight schools use in their instrument rating training. Not a single school use it in a private pilot license course because they aren't supposed to. Some manufacturers use stationary sims in their owner/pilot training for them to get familiar with their aircrafts. But that's different from a license or rating training. In summary of my original point, FAA limits desktop sims to a very narrow use and there are reasons for that. And even that is only for certified simulators like Elite. Jason


Jason

FAA CPL SEL MEL IR CFI-I MEI AGI

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Guest byoung

Jason,I agree with what you are saying. But I look at my situation, as I am not a commercial pilot, and if it weren't for FS2004 and simulators, I wouldn't be experiencing anything aviation wise as it is too costly.My point is that if this person's daughter is not going to persue a commercial aviation career, the money would be better spent acquiring / building a home cockpit. I am not proposing that computer simulation will replace the real thing (I should say yet!). But all you have to add is motion and force feedback based on A/C model and you're about 80% there. Motion is here, but not very cost effective yet. Because no manufacturer will take the huge risk to mass-produce a good motion platform for flight simulation. There is one company that does, but I think it is still about 10K.There is no replacement for the real thing, but I see the gap narrowing and the FAA is reconsidering alternative cost-effective training all the time. This is where I would invest my flying $. Unless my goal was to become a commercial pilot, the entertainment / realism value would be awesome. As real as it gets.Cheers!Barry

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