G-YMML1

Prepar3D and W10 rules of coexistence

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Hello,

I"m currently building new i9 P3D dedicated PC and finally moving toward W10 from W7. Is there any set of rules of FAQ related to proper P3D set-up and installation in W10 environment.

Thanks

Dmitriy

 

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Only an i9?

Don't install P3D into either of the "C:\Program Files" folders. Other than that, have fun.

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Been running P3D v3 and v4 on Windows 10 for a long while. All Windows 10 updates applied too. 

No problems if you follow Jay's advice.

 

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UAC=off.

I have Win10 Home so I can't turn off updates but so far (has it been 2 and a half years already) updates have not been a problem. There are a number of threads on configuring Win 10 so it's less obnoxious and interfering. I'd suggest reading thru a few of them.

You could do a Justin Case and dual boot Win7 and Win10.

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38 minutes ago, G-YMML1 said:

Thanks!

UAC = OFF as with W7, correct? 
Updates = manual?

I have UAC turned on.

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4 hours ago, G-YMML1 said:

Thanks!

UAC = OFF as with W7, correct? 
Updates = manual?

I also leave UAC on. The occasional extra click is not a problem for me. See: https://www.digitalcitizen.life/uac-why-you-should-never-turn-it-off

I leave Windows updates set to automatic but receive only the security and bug fixes and no driver updates. To prevent driver updates (which tend to cause the most problems) see: https://pureinfotech.com/exclude-driver-updates-windows-10/

Despite appearances to the contrary, the vast majority of Windows 10 users have few, if any, problems with updates. Even the recent issues with the 1809 update affected far fewer people than it appeared. According to a statement from Microsoft, it only affected "one one-hundredth of one percent of version 1809 installs" and then only in a very specific set of circumstances. Like most other users, the update went smoothly for me and I was unaffected by any of the reported issues.

It's worth reviewing the privacy settings before you start using Windows 10 as, by default, a lot of information is potentially sent to Microsoft. That said, with the latest (1809) update it's much easier to configure the privacy settings - see: https://4sysops.com/wiki/windows-10-privacy-settings/

Even with its foibles, I think Windows 10 is the best version so far (and that's from a former Windows 7 enthusiast). As with all new versions of Windows there's definitely a learning curve, particularly when trying to locate features and settings, but it's worth the effort in my opinion.

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I have a dual boot, Windows 7 and 10.

I rarely use 7 any more because 10 is indeed so much better.

It is also worth mentioning that the much trumpeted privacy "issue"

applies to Winows 7 as well as 10 and as mentioned, it is much easier to limit in 10.

To answer the exact question there are no rules of coexistance.

 

Edited by nolonger
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Just some thoughts on UAC. I have it on for one computer, off on the rest. I can see its value for a multi-user box, but not so much for a single user machine. Instead, I go to install a program and I get asked if I really want to install it because it will make changes. Of course I want to install it. Any software will make changes to your system. But UAC tells me nothing about the nature of the changes. That would be really useful. Doesn't most software want to modify Windows by adding drivers or adding folders to Windows, for example? It seems to me that UAC might not tell me anything I don't already know. A virus, OTOH, works in the background. A bit at a time. It rarely announces itself. And they get in in spite of AV and UAC.

I would never advise to turn it off (but I wonder) any more that run without AV. But we all have to make decisions based on who uses our computers, and how our systems are used.

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13 hours ago, bobbyjack said:

Just some thoughts on UAC. I have it on for one computer, off on the rest. I can see its value for a multi-user box, but not so much for a single user machine. Instead, I go to install a program and I get asked if I really want to install it because it will make changes. Of course I want to install it. Any software will make changes to your system. But UAC tells me nothing about the nature of the changes. That would be really useful

I think a big advantage of using UAC is not so much that it asks if you really want to install software, but rather that it tells you if background apps, or other running programs, try to do anything unusual or unrequested to your system without asking you first.

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