P_7878

Legacy of the "Flying Crane" - on a "Jumbolino"

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Lufthansa has recently introduced (to somewhat mixed reviews) its new livery, changing the colors of its iconic 100-year-old logo - the stylized flying Crane inside a circle. The background circle color has been now changed from yellow to blue (and the color of the Crane from blue to white). The century-old (previous) logo was first created by the German architect and designer Otto Firle for Deutsche Luft-Reederei (DLR), Lufthansa's predecessor. DLR had started service on February 5, 1919, exactly 100 years ago, to the month, from today. The previous livery was highly regarded in the aviation world (and will be missed) as one of the most beautiful in the skies. While, many of us, here, often recall reminiscences of our first "big" flight on the first "big" airliner; to me, personally speaking, this (old) logo has meant a lot. It was in a LH 747 that I did my first oceanic flight.

I also witnessed, for the first time, the following:

  1. The mind-boggling dimensions of the iconic 747 shape, the high-tail printed with the impressive flying Crane logo, and wondering to myself the same way as people who had probably questioned Joe Sutter's original design wondering if this behemoth would ever be able to go up, stay up, and fly! I was directly looking at one of the true man-made (engineering) wonders of the world - in the LH color.
  2. And, the beauty of the cloud-layers, as viewed from above, stretching all the way to the horizon  - with occasional (tiny-looking) long-haul jets streaking across in the distant sky leaving their contrail tracks.
  3. Also, the high-altitude and high-speed chase towards the setting Sun (while flying West) and watching the marvel of a prolonged (and almost static and beautiful) sunset that seemed to linger for ever.
  4. Most of all, the realization that I'm moving/flying not at ~60 mph (vehicular speed I was used to on ground) but 10 times faster at 600 mph - so smoothly without bumps (most of the time, at least for my flight, see below).

Another thing happened on that first LH 747 flight, that I would never forget. Just before landing, I recall, there was some kind of unexpected encroachment (construction machinery, maybe, not sure) on the runway, so when we were almost about to land (I could clearly see the ground nearby/below), the plane, with a tremendous noise, forcefully climbed back up into the sky. It will take me many more years before I came to know (via PMDG 747) the power of the TOGA button. Looking back, kudos to those (LH) Pilots taking a decision like that just moments before touchdown for the sake of everyone's safety. But, more wonderfully, it was hard for me to imagine that such a large aircraft could really do that (with such a magnificent display of raw power), but it did.

Anyway, now, back to this post here: I've dusted off my (JF) BAe 146-200, recall flying it, maybe once or twice in several years. I've, however, flown the QW version many times, including a test-flight report I'd posted earlier. The BAe146/RJ (such a small aircraft but with 4 engines) have been called, by some, the "Jumbolino". This JF version has a seemingly adequate cockpit appearance/simulation, and I've attempted the basic "Cold & Dark" procedure. For repaint, I've, of course, selected the (old) Lufthansa color (actually Lufthansa Regional CityLine). And, regarding the flight, the BAe-146/RJ is here on a short (<100nm) flight from Birmingham (EGBB) to London City (EGLC). I've tried to refresh my SimBrief memory/skills with a simple route (shown), and have fed it into my FSX FPLN. London City (LCY)'s short runway (plus other approach-related complicating factors) has meant that only certain aircraft types (certified for steep approach) could operate into the airport, and this aircraft, being one of them, has been a regular visitor there. The landing is a challenge - with an extremely steep descent (glide-path slope @ 5.5 degrees) to the runway. For record, in LCY's first year of full-operation (1988), the slope was a staggering 7.5 degrees! You may wish to search for (e.g. "hard landing bae 146 london city"), and view a few videos of actual landings including one (47sec long) of a really rough/crosswind landing! Sometimes, I'm glad, this is just SIM!

Hope you enjoy these sample images below of this peppy little (but striking-looking) aircraft - in spite of limitations in the simulation of its system fidelity. Thanks for viewing. [JF/CLS(BAe146-200),Orbx(UK),REX]

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Edited by P_7878
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Great anthology post as usual. I too had those same feelings when I took my first-ever 747 flight, on a BA to KIAD out of LHR on a 747-200. Followed 10 years later on a Garuda 747-400 out of Amsterdam to Bali; followed by a 747-400 flight on Singapore's Megatop, when, just about to leave the eastern coast of India, as dawn was breaking, I got invited to the Flight Deck(yes, in those long-forgotten days when it was possible) to sit in the Co-Pilot's seat to scan in utter awe, at the digital  displays in front of me, most of them digital glass displays, most if not all, not relating to my RAF VC-10 cockpit servicing days, other than the analogue ones, as the Captain in the left seat explained what this panel was and that panel was----all Greek to me. That was until I got my very first PMDG 747-400.

Now, looking back on it all, it so easily drops into place.

Had the JF model but opted instead of the latest QW one that was on offer recently. Haven't brought it out of the hangar as yet, though.

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Nice shots. I always liked the JF version; didn't even acquire the QW model until recently.

John

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I loved flying on this aircraft in the 80's.  I flew it via Aircal and PSA.  It used to fly out of Concord's Buchanan airfield to LAX but the route was cancelled after only a year or so due to low ridership.  The BAE/Avro was the only high winged airliner I ever flew on (jet airliner, that is, since I have flown in the Dash and the Dornier).  My only Lufthansa flights were on a 737-300 between Frankfurt and Bologna Italy and back.  Nice airline.

John

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Folks: Thanks for the comments and recollections!
John: I posted (separately) the AirCal/PSA BAe-146 liveries...just for memory...both repaints were already present in my livery set of this aircraft...

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Good to still see the old livery here. I'll miss it (as much as I miss Lufthansa's last 737 classics that some years ago still flew from my home airport). And, of course, great pictures!

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