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Posted (edited)

I'm hoping that someone can help me with this, because I am going round in circles. I'm either getting conflicting information from Google searches, or I get articles that I simply don't understand. So here goes. I have a router in the house, with an ethernet cable that runs outside to a separate building where my sim is located, also, it is not possible to get a WiFi connection there. I want to set up a WiFi connection between my Ipad and the computer in the outside building so it allows me to connect the virtual CDU that I want to use via WiFi with the NGX. I am running Win10. I need to add, that the Asus MB does not have any WiFi capability. I did buy a dongle on Amazon, but could not get this to work, regardless of persevering. Am I right in thinking that the dongle was to be used to connect to a wifi router, which I am assuming  is of no help to me. I effectively want to connect my Ipad to the computer that is hard wired to the internet across the garden in the house. I hope I have not confused anyone. Help appreciated fellas. Thanks.

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Edited by Rockliffe

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The dongle is probably too far from the router, and/or is too weak to send a signal between buildings. The cable between the two buildings may need a signal booster attached(?).  Cable TV companies use them all the time (I have one installed).  But don't know if a booster is also available to use for WiFi signals...  

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Howard, I think you should install a Wifi Access Point in the building where your computer is located. You might also need an Ethernet Switch (Gbit preferably) to connect both your access point and your computer to your network (the ethernet cable coming from your router connects to the switch, your computer and the access point also connect to your switch - same principle as connecting to a router).

This way, you connect your Ipad to the Wifi Network of your Access point and can then communicate with your computer.

What is an Access Point?

An access point is a device that creates a wireless local area network, or WLAN, usually in an office or large building. An access point connects to a wired router, switch, or hub via an Ethernet cable, and projects a Wi-Fi signal to a designated area. For example, if you want to enable Wi-Fi access in your company's reception area but don’t have a router within range, you can install an access point near the front desk and run an Ethernet cable through the ceiling back to the server room.

Regards,

 

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8 hours ago, NBouc said:

Howard, I think you should install a Wifi Access Point in the building where your computer is located. You might also need an Ethernet Switch (Gbit preferably) to connect both your access point and your computer to your network (the ethernet cable coming from your router connects to the switch, your computer and the access point also connect to your switch - same principle as connecting to a router).

This way, you connect your Ipad to the Wifi Network of your Access point and can then communicate with your computer.

What is an Access Point?

An access point is a device that creates a wireless local area network, or WLAN, usually in an office or large building. An access point connects to a wired router, switch, or hub via an Ethernet cable, and projects a Wi-Fi signal to a designated area. For example, if you want to enable Wi-Fi access in your company's reception area but don’t have a router within range, you can install an access point near the front desk and run an Ethernet cable through the ceiling back to the server room.

Regards,

 

Ah ha, got it Normand! I now understand. Many thanks for the explanation, appreciated. Cheers.

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Normand is correct about the WAP, but the switch is not needed.  The best WAPs are just routers turned into WAPs (usually easily done within the WAP/router firmware), and all routers have switches (the LAN ports) built into them.  Your WAP will be connected to the Ethernet cable (via the WAPs WAN port... usually yellow) coming into your "sim building".  The WAP LAN ports are usually blue, and you will connect your computer to one of the LAN ports.  The WAP simply becomes an extension of your router (in the house) offering both a wired and wireless connection.  I use pretty much the same set-up for simming on my computer at my desk while using my iPad for real-time navigation/browsing/emails etc.  My iPad connects to a WAP while the computer connects to my router via an Ethernet cable, and the router does, well, all the routing. The router and the WAP are in another room 20 meters away.:biggrin:  Works a peach... yours will too!

One of the best deals in routers for WAP purposes is the ASUS RT-AC66U B1 wireless router.  I've had some real nightmares turning other brands of router into WAPs (Linksys is the worse... incredible how many hoops one must jump through to turn one of their router into a WAP) but ASUS routers can easily be changed to WAPs in just minutes.  If you wish to spend less money just buy a cheaper router, then turn it into a WAP.  Just make sure it has the LAN ports (almost all wireless router that can be used as a WAP have at least 4 LAN ports).  The priority, of course, is to make sure the speed of your WAP (and it's ports... both WAN and LAN) can handle your Internet  connection speed.

HTH and have fun,

Greg

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Greg brings a valid point regarding the switch not really being needed. I was not sure if a WAP came with LAN ports or not (thus the suggestion of the switch). The idea of using another router (old one or new cheap one) turned into a WAP is good. I should have thought of mentioning it since it is how I gave my backyard Wi-Fi access (old Linksys router turned into a WAP located near the back wall of the house).

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3 hours ago, NBouc said:

...not sure if a WAP came with LAN ports or not (thus the suggestion of the switch).

Actually Normand, I've never really looked at a dedicated WAP so I'm not sure they come with multiple LAN ports... but indeed turning an old router into a WAP is a good solution for extending the life of a router.  Today I believe most wireless routers come with at least 4 LAN ports... that's the same as having a 4 port switch built right into the router/WAP!

I need to correct something I wrote above.  The Ethernet cable coming from the house to the "sim building" should NOT be plugged into the WAN port of the WAP.  Every cable that connects to the WAP should be plugged into the LAN ports.  The WAN port on a WAP should be left unused.

Cheers,

Greg

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Posted (edited)

I have to admit, I'm pretty PC savvy, but when it comes to IP addresses, WAPs, ISPs, LANs, WAN's blah blah, I really struggle. I thought I had figured out what I need from the info you guys have given me, but then when I go onto Amazon and search for a bit of kit, I find a wifi/router that I think will be OK and then I read reviews from people saying I need a modem!! I thought modems were built into the computer? I don't have a separate modem for my office PC. Greg recommended a router, but it cost £100! I can't pay money like that just to get my virtual CDU to work. Can anyone offer their opinion on this https://www.amazon.co.uk/TP-LINK-TL-WA801ND-Wireless-Access-Point-Noir/dp/B004UBU8IE/ref=sm_n_au_dka_GB_pr_con_0_1?adId=B004UBU8IE&creativeASIN=B004UBU8IE&linkId=7ae4a33115d7e6f4dbdd27f29c06b54f&tag=spgadgetsuk-21&linkCode=w41&ref-refURL=https%3A%2F%2Fgadgets-reviews.com%2Freview%2F838-best-wireless-access-points.html&slotNum=7&imprToken=TOcI2HPwseXZt3-Mnd8lLQ&adType=smart&adMode=auto&adFormat=grid&impressionTimestamp=1552990049101

Edited by Rockliffe

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Rockliffe said:

Greg recommended a router, but it cost £100! I can't pay money like that just to get my virtual CDU to work.

Do you not have an old wifi router sitting around in a cupboard which you could repurpose?

For the TP-Link wireless access point you linked, you'd either have to connect it to your system with an Ethernet cable or it would have to be in range of your house wifi signal. Clearly, if it was in range, you'd be able to pick up the wifi on your iPad so wouldn't need it.

If your outbuilding is on the same ring main as the house, a powerline adapter with a wifi booster may be an option: https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-WPA4220KIT-Powerline-Broadband-Configuration-UK/dp/B01LXOZ4EN/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1552998127&sr=8-6&keywords=tplink+powerline+adapter. It plugs into your main router via an Ethernet cable and then, through a nearby mains socket, transmits the network connection over your house wiring to a remote unit which plugs into a mains socket. The remote unit then becomes both a wired and wireless access point. I'm successfully using one to get wifi in a part of the house which doesn't normally get a reliable signal.

Edited by vortex681

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8 hours ago, vortex681 said:

Do you not have an old wifi router sitting around in a cupboard which you could repurpose?

For the TP-Link wireless access point you linked, you'd either have to connect it to your system with an Ethernet cable or it would have to be in range of your house wifi signal. Clearly, if it was in range, you'd be able to pick up the wifi on your iPad so wouldn't need it.

If your outbuilding is on the same ring main as the house, a powerline adapter with a wifi booster may be an option: https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-WPA4220KIT-Powerline-Broadband-Configuration-UK/dp/B01LXOZ4EN/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1552998127&sr=8-6&keywords=tplink+powerline+adapter. It plugs into your main router via an Ethernet cable and then, through a nearby mains socket, transmits the network connection over your house wiring to a remote unit which plugs into a mains socket. The remote unit then becomes both a wired and wireless access point. I'm successfully using one to get wifi in a part of the house which doesn't normally get a reliable signal.

Sure, I have a buddy coming over on Thursday with a spare router that he has! Fingers crossed 😉

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1 hour ago, Rockliffe said:

Sure, I have a buddy coming over on Thursday with a spare router that he has! Fingers crossed 😉

That's a good solution! 🥂

Just for reference here... what is the speed of your internet service?

Greg

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18 hours ago, lownslo said:

That's a good solution! 🥂

Just for reference here... what is the speed of your internet service?

Greg

It's about 15Mbs, more or less.

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