scianoir

Just Flight 152 and Archer at 50% off

Recommended Posts

Subscribers to the Just Flight newsletter can get 50% off the Ce152 and PA-28-181 Archer until July 14th. Both of these have been developed by their great in-house team and I have the 152 which I can confirm is an excellent replication of this classic trainer. I haven’t bought the Archer, as I already had the A2A PA-28, but by all accounts this too is an excellent aircraft and exceptionally good value with 50% off.

Bill 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Posted (edited)

Hi Bill, I have the Just Flight C152 for X-Plane 11 and it has a terrible looping sound effect at low idle, like a really annoying ticking sound. It goes away when you open the throttle somewhat, but it comes back when you throttle back to lose altitude, coming in to land or waiting to take off for example.

I'm guessing it is not there in the FSX/P3D version, otherwise you wouldn't talk so highly of it. I haven't spoken to Just Flight about it yet, to see if there is a fix. The flight model is great and visually the aircraft is stunning, but that looping sound is a bit of an immersion-breaker for me.

Troye

Edited by rooitou

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you obtain this discount?  I have subscribed to the newsletter, but have not received one yet and don' t know how to obtain the discount code.  Contacting Just Flight with a question about this in nearly impossible.

Mike

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, rooitou said:

it has a terrible looping sound effect at low idle, like a really annoying ticking sound.

Hi Troye, I haven’t flown the 152 for a while but I have to say I haven’t been aware of a looping sound in FSX, but perhaps I don’t run it at low idle for long enough! I generally find looping sounds exceptionally annoying so I think I would have noticed it if it was present, however I will recheck it tomorrow.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A lot of FSX SE stuff from Just Flight on sale from june 25 till I think July 9. Their wwii warbirds are good cheap substitutes for A2A.

Just like in real life the Jap Zero was very easy to fly and very fast (compared to modern General Aviation planes). Unlike the better fighters which were even faster but much more difficult to handle.

It's easy to see why the Japanese made so many ! Boom and Zoom.

 

Edited by Fielder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, scianoir said:

Hi Troye, I haven’t flown the 152 for a while but I have to say I haven’t been aware of a looping sound in FSX, but perhaps I don’t run it at low idle for long enough! I generally find looping sounds exceptionally annoying so I think I would have noticed it if it was present, however I will recheck it tomorrow.

Bill

Rechecked the 152 in FSX today at low idle - in the VC view I cannot hear any significant looping but in the external (spot) view there is some very slight looping but not enough to be annoying.

So if you are encountering annoying looping in X-Plane it may be worth running it past Just Flight - they are usually very helpful.

Bill

Edited by scianoir
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 6/27/2019 at 3:11 PM, scianoir said:

Rechecked the 152 in FSX today at low idle - in the VC view I cannot hear any significant looping but in the external (spot) view there is some very slight looping but not enough to be annoying.

So if you are encountering annoying looping in X-Plane it may be worth running it past Just Flight - they are usually very helpful.

Bill

Great, thanks for the feedback Bill. I will take it up with Just Flight. Suspect that perhaps the sound system in X-Plane is a little different to FSX/P3D and it didn't translate well. Or perhaps a setting on my side needs tweaking.

Edited by rooitou

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/27/2019 at 8:07 AM, Fielder said:

Just like in real life the Jap Zero was very easy to fly and very fast (compared to modern General Aviation planes). Unlike the better fighters which were even faster but much more difficult to handle.

It's easy to see why the Japanese made so many ! Boom and Zoom.

Actually, the A6M was in fact pretty tricky to fly when it came to combat. It's true that it had very good maneuverability at low speeds and was light on the controls at low speeds, which of course made it good if there was a turning fight (although it is worth noting that turn capability is generally more use in defence than offence where fighters are concerned), but as speeds increased even moderately, i.e. over 200 mph, it got very stiff on the controls. This control stiffness was actually intentional on the part of its designers, because the A6M's incredibly light construction gave it a very low Vne; it would have easily become overstressed in a dive if full control deflections had been attempted. The A6M was just 5,200 lb when fully loaded, by comparison, the the Curtiss P40 Warhawk had a gross weight of 8,515 lb and the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair weighed well over double the weight of an A6M when fully loaded, being 9,205 lb even when it was completely empty!

The light construction of the A6M, which contributed in large part to its famed low-speed maneuverability, was basically forced upon its designers owing to the tough requirement specification which the Japanese Navy issued when seeking design proposals from aircraft manufacturers. Nakajima (i.e. car manufacturer Subaru these days) didn't even bother submitting a design because they deemed the requirements to necessitate too many compromises and instead built the Ki-43 for the Army, but Mitsubishi did submit a design for the Navy's fighter, and that's why the A6M was 'chosen'; because it was the only option the Imperial Japanese forces had to choose from!

As a result, the metal skinning of the A6M was very thin - just 1.2 mm on the forward sections and down to a slim 0.5 mm thickness on the rear sections. If you actually take a look at surviving A6Ms, even beautifully restored ones in flying condition, you'll see that the fuselage skin, particularly on the rear fuselage, is rippled like crazy in spite of that restored status because it is so paper thin.

Now it is worth pointing out here that the alloy skin of an aeroplane is not meant to be some kind of bullet-proofing, so as far as its thickness is concerned with regards to taking fire, that's not a big deal, and Allied aeroplane skins were not much thicker than the heavier skin sections of the A6M, but the difference is that the A6M had no armour protection at all, not even self-sealing fuel tanks. The moment Allied pilots realised that the best way to deal with an A6M was either run away and fight another day if you didn't have a positional advantage, or if you did have a positional advantage, simply dive on the A6M making a high speed firing pass, it was all over for the A6M. The spell of its mythical invincibility was broken; with no armour protection, the A6M would light up like a roman candle after very few hits.

Ultimately, maneuverability is all very well, but speed and rate of climb will let you choose when and when not to fight, which is why stuff like the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair would eat A6Ms for breakfast. Unfortunately for the Japanese, with the A6Ms intended replacements all running into development problems, they were forced to keep manufacturing the A6M as the Navy's fighter, eventually making about 11,000 of them, although this pales into insignificance when compared to the production runs of many Allied and Axis warplanes.

In fairness, there were some very good things about the A6M, particularly its instrument panel, which was very well laid out, especially in comparison to the rather haphazard, confusing layout of many Allied aircraft's instrument panels, particularly British aeroplanes of the period; something which is not conducive to easily maintaining situational awareness during the stress of combat. The A6M had an incredible range (better than even a P51 Mustang fitted with drop tanks), its armament was reasonably good and compared to many Allied aeroplanes, it offered pretty good visibility in all directions from its raised cockpit canopy.

It is interesting to note however, where the A6M is concerned, that it is a bit like the Spitfire in one respect, that of combat successes: Most people have heard of the Japanese 'Zero' and of the British Spitfire, and if you asked many people to say what won the Battle of Britain, they'd probably say the Spitfire when in fact the Hawker Hurricane shot down many more German aircraft in that battle. The same is true of the A6M 'Zero', it is the Japanese warplane which most people have heard of, but in fact the Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa (known to the Allies as the 'Oscar' but often mistaken for being an A6M and sometimes even called the 'Army Zero') is the Japanese fighter aircraft which destroyed the most allied warplanes by a quite considerable margin and most Japanese aces flew the Ki-43 rather than the A6M.

In any case, you are right, the Just Flight A6M is a fun thing and like most of the reasonably recent FSX Just Flight Offerings, it works in P3D Version 4.5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now