Jump to content

niksan29

Precision-RNAV (RNAV 1/RNP 1)

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

If you have the equipment with an  of Precision-RNAV (RNAV 1/RNP 1),you can  landing with the requirements RNP 0.15-0.30?

And how do I know if the RAIM function is available?

Edited by niksan29

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, RNAV1 is a terminal phase specification.

For RNP Approach operations down to RNP 0.30 you would need RNP APCH certification (PBN code S1/S2) and for approaches below RNP 0.30 you would need RNP AR capability (PBN code T1/T2) (much more involved!).

You can do a RAIM availability forecast during preflight using a web-based tool like AUGUR to check whether you can expect to have enough satellites visible to perform the procedure in the first instance. In flight your equipment should have a means of alerting you if the GPS integrity is no longer acceptable (e.g. "GPS PRIMARY LOST" on Airbus aircraft - something like a G1000 is probably a lot more sophisticated!).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

and for RNP 0.50 is also not suitable? or  RNAV 1 only terminal phase ? not  landing?

 

In this case, does this mean that the accuracy corresponds to RNP 0.30 and even for  0.15?(Dash 8 q400 in fly)

dash.jpg

 

 

Edited by niksan29

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, skelsey said:

No, RNAV1 is a terminal phase specification.

For RNP Approach operations down to RNP 0.30 you would need RNP APCH certification (PBN code S1/S2) and for approaches below RNP 0.30 you would need RNP AR capability (PBN code T1/T2) (much more involved!).

You can do a RAIM availability forecast during preflight using a web-based tool like AUGUR to check whether you can expect to have enough satellites visible to perform the procedure in the first instance. In flight your equipment should have a means of alerting you if the GPS integrity is no longer acceptable (e.g. "GPS PRIMARY LOST" on Airbus aircraft - something like a G1000 is probably a lot more sophisticated!).

Hi Simon

In a Boeing we have a ANP/RNP readout on the ND. Where is this information in the bus ?

 

Thanks

Michael Moe

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
50 minutes ago, Michael Moe said:

Where is this information in the bus ?

it is here, very high accuracy(A320 in land):

rnp.jpg

Edited by niksan29
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, niksan29 said:

and for RNP 0.50 is also not suitable? or  RNAV 1 only terminal phase ? not  landing?

Exactly - RNAV1 is a terminal phase spec, not approach phase, so is not applicable to approach procedures.

5 hours ago, niksan29 said:

In this case, does this mean that the accuracy corresponds to RNP 0.30 and even for  0.15?(Dash 8 q400 in fly)

ANP must remain < RNP during any RNP operation. However, just because the ANP is say 0.14 does not automatically mean the aircraft (or you) is certified for those operations as there are more factors at play (e.g. crew training, plus for example one of the requirements for RNP <0.30 is that a lateral devation display and ANP/XTK error must be visible in the pilot's field of view (e.g. on the PFD/ND and not just buried in the FMS). The Limitations/Type of Operations section of the FCOM will tell you what the aircraft is certified for.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, skelsey said:

RNAV1 is a terminal phase spec, not approach phase

and where does the terminal phase end and the approach phase begin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, niksan29 said:

and where does the terminal phase end and the approach phase begin?

The Initial Approach Fix (IAF).

Essentially SIDs and STARs are terminal procedures. Between the end point of the SID and the start point of the STAR is the enroute phase. A STAR (if available) enables a transition from the enroute phase to the approach phase and normally the STAR will end at the IAF for a specific instrument approach procedure (IAP).

At the IAF you are then going to be joining the initial approach segment of an IAP. This is the segment between the IAF and the Final Approach Fix (FAF). The final approach segment then runs from the FAF to the Missed Approach Point (MAPt). After the MAPt is the visual segment (to landing) or the Missed Approach segment.

Obviously not all airfields have STARs published in which case you will normally route to the IAF and join the IAP effectively direct from the enroute phase. Likewise where there is no SID you essentially transition directly to the enroute phase after takeoff.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 7/31/2019 at 6:34 PM, skelsey said:

display and ANP/XTK error must be visible in the pilot's field of view (e.g. on the PFD/ND and not just buried in the FMS)

yes, this is one of the main differences between RNAV and RNP!

some graphic information on the topic

image-thumb1.png

Screenshot-20190802-024010678-1.jpg

Edited by niksan29

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...