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What programming languages did you study?

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12 hours ago, Rob_Ainscough said:

The same can be said about programming languages

Rob,

When I started programing I was doing Assembly and Fortran using punch cards and when I retired a couple of years ago we were using Julia to build our models.  Yea, I know I'm old. 🤣

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I'm lucky, I missed the punch cards by 1 year ... PDP-11/44.

250px-Pdp11_44.jpg

4MB memory limit, 16bit addressing ... powerful!!

Cheers, Rob.

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I will never forget the thousands of cards I punched. I had decks that were in excess of 5000 cards and you never wanted to drop one. Glad those days are over. 

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3 minutes ago, 188AHC said:

I will never forget the thousands of cards I punched. I had decks that were in excess of 5000 cards and you never wanted to drop one. Glad those days are over. 

yes, 1974, IBM 360, Fortran.....

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Rob_Ainscough said:

I'm lucky, I missed the punch cards by 1 year ... PDP-11/44.

250px-Pdp11_44.jpg

4MB memory limit, 16bit addressing ... powerful!!

Cheers, Rob.

yes, 1976, PDP 8, paper tape and booting the machine by loading the boot program with switches

Edited by yurei

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My very first "programming" adventure on the IBM360 was to use the console to toggle in "Hello World" and have it print out on the line printer. I had the same professor for Fortran IV, COBOL and RPG one semester. He used essentially the same exercise in each language for all three classes. I turned in one of assignments where I had used RPG for the I/O, COBOL sub-routines for the database, and Fortran IV sub-routines to handle the math... All three classes covered in one program...

...he was not really amused, but conceded that I had in fact completed the assignment in a unique way and allowed it to stand as satisfactory. He just stated "Don't do that again" in my classes!

I had a real mind-bender when I took two semesters worth of Lisp... :blink:

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I programmed in Cobol, Basic, RPG, Fortran, and machine.  Actually, it was fun at the time but I'm glad it's over now.

Many years ago I wrote a complete accounting package in Basic on a Commodore Pet with 4k of memory and a tape drive. Boy, I thought I was something.😁

Now it seems as if programs are starving if they don't have 16gb of memory. It's been wonderful to have lived through this life of computer development . Young people today have no idea.😊

 

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OK. I got caught up in talking about our computer histories and got somewhat off topic. I apologize.  I blame Bluestar. He started it.😁

However, our conversation does tie in with the subject at hand, "What developers want" but that's a stretch.  I promise not to do it again.

I will give myself 12 hours of suspension for being bad. Please forgive me.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, n4gix said:

.. two semesters worth of Lisp... :blink:

Lisp was very interesting...Lua is actually very similar.

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But what was your first "personal computer" you owned?

This was my first love (age 16) ... 13" color TV, 64KB, cassette loader ... locked in room with my TAB soda reading a BASIC manual ... later I upgraded to 128KB floppy disk drive ... and then my first adventures with a 300 baud modem on CompuServe.

uc?id=1um8bDOdHmS86zQ57T1kawchMHLN4SbFO

uc?id=1juBB_3rX2bTpaAOjbCGzkIHhJXGdf8lV

uc?id=1XKZHsC_biNIwxwVouY142rEoP6ni2U6c

I wish I could say "good old days" ... in many ways it was, in other's not so much (especially networking BNC and working IRQ jumpers) ... what I find interesting is the Indie games of Today that are going "retro" have become very popular ... so maybe it's not always about visuals.

Cheers, Rob.

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umm....timeline by programming language...

1973-1974 Basic and Fortran on IBM 1130 (some dabble in RPG) my first program was a Turing machine emulator

1974-1976 Fortran IV  and LISP on IBM 360

1975-1977 PAL 3 Assembly language on PDP-8

1980-1985 Basic on HP 85/86 (wrote a lot of math software for mapping industry on these)

1985-1989 Basic on DOS based IBM PC 

1989-1996 the "modern" era of Windows

1992-1993 my first network based on Windows NT 3.0

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and now back to the current time xD we have started with Scala in the first years during computer science studies (2013-2017) and then moved on to Java together with some a basic course in Assembler to learn how it is all working on the lower end xD. In my spare time I have teached myself C#

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I thought it couldn't get any better when we went to an IBM 370 running on DOS.

One of the things I liked about COBOL was the ability to do my sorts in the JCL.  

I also thought BASIC was a very good language with a lot of power.  On one trip from NYC to SFO I wrote a program in it to see how many digits of 4ATAN(1) it could calculate. I got to 2^15.  I figured to get the program to go any farther I would have to lie to it.  🙂

 

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I started with a comodore 64, you used magnetic tapes to read and save your code..

Then Cobol, Fortram, Pascal and C++. Learned later Visual Basic, Clarion, Java, JavaScript, and many others.

Lately. NET C# and VB, I think it is fair to say we developers learn anything after the first 2 languages are mastered, it always amaze me our ability to adapt, specially when you look back in time as per this thread.

I wonder what would be 25 years from now, specially with the speed of changes with current technologies.

My hats off to all of you.. 

Regards,

Simbol 

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Posted (edited)

I'm probably one of the few people here under the age of 30 who knows the difference between a floppy and a stiffy and has seen and worked with both.

Edited by JB3DG

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hahahaha! Shout out to all the dinosaurs here!

Not sure if I should be sad or happy for having missed that wonderful era of punch cards. My first experience programming was Turbo Pascal on a 80386SX with 8MB(?) extended RAM - and it was a "laptop". 😮

Do you remember these things (found through a google search)?

maxresdefault.jpg

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On 8/5/2019 at 2:28 PM, GMVitus said:

hahahaha! Shout out to all the dinosaurs here!

Not sure if I should be sad or happy for having missed that wonderful era of punch cards. My first experience programming was Turbo Pascal on a 80386SX with 8MB(?) extended RAM -

I had a 386SX/20.  I can't remember how much ram it had.  4 megs maybe.  Not much.

It was a step up from the Apple //e I had before that.  It had 128k of ram.  Friend had a TRS-80 so that brings back memories.  Any of you have an Odyssey game console by chance?

When I started college in 1991 they were still teaching COBOL -- it was the last semester for it.  You had to upload your programs to a server, where they were compiled, if I'm remembering it correctly.   I saw a lot of change in comps at that time -- by the time I was a senior they had html classes and the web had become a little more mainstream.  When I started it was telnet and usenet groups, no browser.  Mosaic browser was a wonder when I saw it for the first time.

On topic.  I took classes in Modula-2, QBASIC, Applesoft BASIC, Turbo Pascal, C, COBOL, and Visual Basic.  SQL also, but that wasn't exactly the same.  Anyway, I've pretty much forgotten them all.  😀

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School

- Basic on some HP Mini using Cards w/ Pencil

- Pascal, Fortran, Cobol, Assembler and C on some IBM  (Cobol on Cards)

- Assembler, ADA and some crazy language where you wrote a whole program on one line on a Unix Box (PDP/11??)

Home

- Basic / Forth on TI-99/4A

- C++ on IBM OS/2

- A bunch of stuff on PC's

IRL

- Cobol / JCL, ABAP/4, Natural/Adabas on IBM 370

- C#, C++, Javascript .... on PCs

 

Just started playing with Lua for hooking up hardware to P3D, jury is still out on that one.

 

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Posted (edited)

Fortran IV on Data General SuperNova, serial #4..  :cool:

Edited by Bert Pieke
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Posted (edited)

Turbo Pascal, C, Delphi, Basic , VBasic, Os400 (RPG?), Assembly ofcourse!

Edited by adino

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I'm a late starter... real late, ha!  I just design and if I need to automate somthin' I just learn the language as needed.  Last couple of years have been vbscript, JAVA, and now Python. Whatever works to get the job done.

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Sinclair BASIC on the ZX81
6502 assembler and Commodore BASIC on Commodore VIC-20, 64 and Pet.
6502 assembler and BBC BASIC on the Acorn Electron and BBC Model B
Borland Turbo C on MS DOS
Had a life for 10 years or so...
C++ but now mostly C#.NET and .NET Core in Microsoft land, with the prerequisite amount of Perl, PHP. JS and whatever else gets thrown at me.

It's all still 1s and 0s and I absolutely believe that the early years of 6502 programming still help me every single day as a full time software engineer.

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