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Bilbosmeggins

Any good training books?

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A plane flies by the same principles in the UK as it does in the US....or any other part of the world for that matter. Yes the FAA books are a bit dry, but they cover very good fundamental information in quite a bit of depth. But I certainly understand the desire to have something a little more basic and entertaining. Good luck on your search. Let us know if you find what you are looking for. 


Chris

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You can always check other flight forums, such as A2A forums, They love spreading "flying" info, and the discussions are far from "dry"


i7 7700K @4.2, GTX 1060 6 Gig, 32 GB ram, Windows 10, P3D v 5, and MSFS 2020 and a couple of SSD's

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Thanks each for the various suggestions.  From what I can glean, it looks like there is no true successor to the original book I listed. That’s a shame, because it was right on the money. I’ll find something, somewhere eventually 😉


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Check Amazon, search for flight, flying and especially flight simulation.

Also, don't forget there are excellent educational sites put up by flight simmers and also flight simulation does a pretty good job of mirroring real world aviaiton, so those sites will help you too.  We've been at this for 40 years now, so there is a LOT of GREAT information out there, including free web based ILS simulators, etc. etc. etc.

 


Dave-Aerosoft-2021-Small.png

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Thanks @DaveCT2003  I have had a bit of a mooch around, and come to the conclusion that there is no real substitute. So, given I still have my old, and very capable, PC, I am going to install FSX on it, and go through the old book, along with all of the training files. I can use my new PC for fun, and implementing what I’ve learned, and the old one as my training station.  Best of both worlds then.

Thanks each 🙂


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Flight simulation can be tough to learn. 
 

not only just the “flying/piloting” part but the learning how to operate the sim, setting controls correctly, etc 

id choose the c152 or the DR400 and go slow.  Remember you don’t have to obey proper rules, etc. make it as easy as you can on yourself. 


Ciao!

 

 

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3 hours ago, briansommers said:

Flight simulation can be tough to learn. 
 

not only just the “flying/piloting” part but the learning how to operate the sim, setting controls correctly, etc 

id choose the c152 or the DR400 and go slow.  Remember you don’t have to obey proper rules, etc. make it as easy as you can on yourself. 

Thanks. Although I should point out that I have been flight simming since the early 80’s. But my enjoyment has always been from the actual flying, rather than the learning of instruments. Consequently, I can get most things up in the air safely, handle most conditions, and return to Earth again with a reasonable degree of skill. From the instruments, I tended to learn only what I deemed as being absolutely essential to get me up, round, and down again.  

At the risk of upsetting, and alienating, most of the people on these forums, I’ll readily admit that I have little to no interest in most aeroplanes. In real life, I flew hang gliders and paragliders. So I’m reasonably well acquainted with the theory of flight. If there was a decent simulator for either of those activities then I wouldn’t be on here. If birds and flying insects were offered up in a simulator, I’d be on it in a flash. I’m in love with flying in it’s purest form. Not engine types, SIDS,STARS and all of the rest of it.

Having said that, I have taken the trouble to learn various procedures in the past, but, because I’ve not religiously practised and applied them, they have fallen by the wayside, and quickly been forgotten. So, I thought it was about time I took a systematic approach, hence looking for an up to date equivalent (or better) of the FSX book mentioned in the OP.  See if I can wring a bit more depth out of the sim than I generally settle for.  Hope this makes some sense 😉


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There is one book that is considered the bible and almost mandatory reading for pilots: Stick n Rudder. Never before or since has there been a better book to learn about flying and it is as relevant to a sim pilot as it is to a real world 747 captain. 

Stick and Rudder: An Explanation of the Art of Flying By Wolfgang Langewiesche | Used | 9780070362406 | World of Books

It's not hard to read at all, it is very human. I highly recommend this to you.

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Thanks for the recommendation. I’ve had a look at the reviews, and the chapter topics that it covers. It is obviously a great book, and has a lot of followers. However, it appears to be covering the principles of flight primarily, and that is not what I’m searching for. It’s systems, instruments, and protocol that I’m needing to acquaint myself with. And a lot has changed since 1944. Except the basic principles of flight, and theory of lift etc, which, as I said, I’m totally okay with. 
 

It may be a book that I could see myself purchasing further down the line, purely for light reading, and entertainment purposes.  It’d be nice to see his hand-sketched drawings etc, outlying the various topics, as it does seem like it was a labour of love when he wrote the book. However, it’s definitely not the book I’m needing here and now.  Much appreciate the heads-up though 🙂


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You may consider the following book:

Bruce Williams: Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator; John Wiley & Sons; 2012; ISBN 978-1-118-10502-3

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5 hours ago, asanosho said:

You may consider the following book:

Bruce Williams: Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator; John Wiley & Sons; 2012; ISBN 978-1-118-10502-3

It’s no good unfortunately, because, again, it relies on files for either FSX or XPlane being used alongside the lessons. Which would put me right back to square one. Thanks though 🙂


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Posted (edited)

That looks an interesting collection. I’ll have a browse and see if any fit the bill. Thanks very much 🙂🙂

Edited by Bilbosmeggins
Typo

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Stern's Flight Simulator Handbook is excellent. I own it as a hardcopy. For some time I was in hope to see a release for the more recent MS Simulator versions, but it seems to have been abandoned now.

Kind regards, Michael


MSFS, P3D Professional 5, AeroflyFS2, XP11; Beta tester of SimStarter, SPAD.neXt, and FS-FlightControl

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On 4/11/2021 at 10:40 AM, Bilbosmeggins said:

Thanks for the recommendation. I’ve had a look at the reviews, and the chapter topics that it covers. It is obviously a great book, and has a lot of followers. However, it appears to be covering the principles of flight primarily, and that is not what I’m searching for. It’s systems, instruments, and protocol that I’m needing to acquaint myself with. And a lot has changed since 1944. Except the basic principles of flight, and theory of lift etc, which, as I said, I’m totally okay with. 
 

It may be a book that I could see myself purchasing further down the line, purely for light reading, and entertainment purposes.  It’d be nice to see his hand-sketched drawings etc, outlying the various topics, as it does seem like it was a labour of love when he wrote the book. However, it’s definitely not the book I’m needing here and now.  Much appreciate the heads-up though 🙂

have a look here? http://www.parafly-sim.co.uk/videos/

 

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