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rodger

RealAir SF260 AP confusion

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Okay, well, this is in fact the same as listening to the engine. only a bit more precise. ;) But I thought you had to keep an eye on the EGT...BTW I also like the very complete checklist that comes with the plane! Only thing I'm missing is when to turn on and off specific lights. What's most realistic? In my other GA-planes I turn on the beacon just before starting the engine and I don't turn it off just before I stop the engine again. Landing, nav en strobe lights are turned on before entering the runway. The SF260 has no taxi-light, so maybe I should turn one of those three lights on sooner...? I turn them off again when I leave the runway after landing. During the flight all lights are on, although I usually turn off landinglight when I am above 10.000.Is this a bit realistic? Or am I being too precise about this all? ;)

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We leave the beacon light on permanently as a safety precaution (got this practice from the Civil Air Patrol). The reason is, is that if for some reason you forget to turn off the master switch-when you exit the plane you will immediately notice. Also, when starting up-it will warn everyone that startup is about to occur-so I'd just set it and leave it on-permanently.As far as the other lights-the Faa recommends landing lights within 10 miles of an airport for collision awareness. However, my plane has strobe anti collision lights so I turn those on -I can't rmemember if the real air has the landing lights on the landing gear but it would be impractical to lower it 10 miles out-strobes would accomplish the same. The other lights I leave off during the day time. Nav's are required on at night.I haven't used the autopilot on the real air (like the poster above I see little reason to-I also do this on my real plane except in extremely long cross countries). However, what you are describing is how these model autopilots perform.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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Thx for the info! So my beacon-usage was already good. ;) Didn't know about the Nav only at night! I understand that 1. you dont' turn the strobes on by default either, but only within 10 miles from an airfield, and 2. normally you wouldn't use strobes. So... when are they supposed to be used? Anyway, from now on I will keep the beacon on at all times and only use strobes within 10 miles from the airfield. Nav for nights, and landing er... well, I guess only when I need them (taking off or landing at night).Yes, I like to do things are realistic as possible. ;) So... my first flight will be without AP and GPS but manual and VOR to VOR. I'll use the GPS as a backup though, to see if I am going the right direction. ;) No need to make it too difficult! (Well, that has to be my second flight, because first I want to see if I really got it right about the AP!)

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I turn on the strobes when atc calls out traffic, when getting in congested airspace, or near an airport-e.g. when you really want to make sure you are seen. Mine are actually pulse lights-and they can be annoying to others when taxing around or to you when flying in clouds-so I'd have them off then.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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>Yes, I like to do things are realistic as possible. ;) So...>my first flight will be without AP and GPS but manual and VOR>to VOR. I'll use the GPS as a backup though, to see if I am>going the right direction. ;) No need to make it too>difficult! (Well, that has to be my second flight, because>first I want to see if I really got it right about the AP!)To farther confuse the issue..... :-hah Within the homebuilt/kitbuilt/experimental market; we've got some new high tech solid state auto pilots these days; that use the GPS for heading information.So.........out with the old fashioned "zigzagging" VORs and in with the new A/Ps programed to your colorized moving map GPS flight plan. Use this system as a primary function; and should you have VOR capaibility, then use it as something to pass time with, while remembering the "old days"! :-lol Just a typical homebuilt/kitbuilt panel...http://forums.avsim.net/user_files/174036.jpg

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Had my first complete 'real' flight with the SF260 today (didn't have the time yesterday). What can I say... WOW! Great plane. Flew it manually above Norway and it was awesome. Man, do I love the way you have to turn the dials! It's so realistic! And quick! And smooth!Trimming is easy, setting the right RPM and so on too: what else could you expect with those smooth gauges!After landing I spend almost 15 minutes just admiring all knobs and details and turning everything around. ;) Everything is so smooth! Every knob and arrow and whatever. Even the HDG sign on the HSI doesn't magically popup when you turn off the battery: you can see it swivel down!Yes, I am very happy with the plane! :)One general question though about going down... Going up is described well in the manual and checklist, but when I have to go down, should I lower the throttle completely? Or to about 10? Or just leave it and speed on down...? What is a good descentrate and speed? Also, the prop and mixture have to on be before landing. This doesn't mean they have to be up when you start going down, I guess...?Not that this all matters much, because I completed the flight well, but I like to know how this is done IRL.BTW I did not fly VOR to VOR but used the bearing-info on the GPS to set the heading bug and followed that manually. VOR to VOR is often not possible on the trips I make. So I only use the GPS as some sort of back up/guidance/heading info (only looking at it when I really need to) and don't let it run the AP (even though I know it like my back pocket by now).There is only ONE thing that really ####### me off...: I should have bought the darned thing the day it was released... :(

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Going down takes some planning if you want to "baby" the engine.I usually start by reducing the manifold very gradually after starting the decent to keep just out of the yellow area (in calm air) but maintain maximum safe speed. As you get closer to your destination pull the manifold very gradually-reduce an inch a minute or so and time it so that when you reach the pattern or faf you are at about 15-17" (depending on if winter or summer). I usually have the mixtures full rich at 3000 ft. (per manufacturer recommendation). Put the props full in about a mile out-(in case of a go around)-they make a nasty sound that can scare your passengers so save that for last.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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Thx! (Again! ;) ) This is exactly the kind of detailed information I was hoping for. Nothing better than getting detailed info from a real world pilot. I think by now I know everything there is to know now to handle my SF260 as real as possible! :)Funny that you when focus on flying and actually got a great plane to fly, you completely forget about blurry scenery, popping autogen, low settings and the lot. :( FSX looks totaly awesome to me now!P.S. BTW Pity the on/off button positions of the radiostack aren't saved... They are on everytime I load the plane. I'd like it if I have to turn them on one by one. But maybe this is realistic too (that you always leave them on and turn them all off and on with the avionics button...?)

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As Geof mentions 3000' for mixture and full rich; it's a bit different out here in the Mt.West. At 4600' to start with, we lean right after engine start, lean again before takeoff; adjust in flight, and never go full rich to land............cause you'll loose significant takeoff power incase of a go-around.L.Adamson

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I've been following your familiarisation with the SF260 with interest. The SF260, as you are discovering, can be flown either by the seat of your pants (and brain) or with full IFR capability. The choice is yours.Personally I like to fly it with the minimum aids, to practice map reading and occasionally referring to GPS if I get lost, or shooting a few VOR navigation challenges.One thing we would have liked to emulate, but which is hard to do in FS and FSX, is the engine stress related to shock cooling of the engine when running at idle and descending. For this reason descending on idle thrust from a high altitude is discouraged. But there are no hard and fast rules about this which is why we didn't give much advice in the documents about it.Thanks for the appreciation of the handling of the instruments through our unconventional mouse use. We think it works well.Kind regards,Rob Young - RealAir Simulations

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>Personally I like to fly it with the minimum aids, to practice>map reading and occasionally referring to GPS if I get lost,>or shooting a few VOR navigation challenges.Yes, I like to do this too now! I am used to flying short flights with the AP on after takeoff and just before landing (using GPS mostly). Enjoying the view and so on. But with the SF260 I am enjoying the flying itself! I have done several flights without any AP at all: sometimes I use the GPS just to see if I am going a bit in the right direction. And I have to say (again ;) ) this is fun! Big advantage is that blurring and popping up isn't such a big deal anymore. :( And yes, the handling of the instruments works EXTREMELY well!How's the Scout and Duke coming on? :(

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I've had the RealAir 260 for a few months now and have really enjoyed flying it.I thought there would never be a plane that could be more fun to fly.Well,I went a bought the RealAir Spitfire and now the 260 sits in the hangar mostly.I was never a big warbird fan and being from United States really didn't know much about the Spit.After reading some comments over at sim-outhouse.com I decided to give it a try.How can 2000 plus horsepower not be a blast.Add to that the incredible sound,the incredible vc and the fact that if you push the engine too hard for too long your windshield will be oil covered and you'll be looking for a place to sit her down real quick.Of course the true FSX version should be out soon so anyone wanting to get it may be better off waiting but the FS9 version works pretty well once you move some gauge files around.From now on I'll be buying everything RealAir releases.Michael

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yeah, the Spitfire is exceptionally good. I've got all of RA's planes (for FS9) and they are all just superb.

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Scout is due any day now, and the Spitfire by late summer. The Duke is delayed until all the other aircraft are updated for FSX, but we really are keen to get cracking again on the Duke, which is about at the halfway point of development.All the Best,Rob Young - RealAir Simuations

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lol Michael, does that PMDG sig have teeth in the cargo front of the nose?LOL

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