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martin-w

3D printed housing continuing to progress.

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What about these Noel? You'd look sexy in these at the Roswell UFO meetings. People would think it was alien tech. 😏

 

This parametric 3D printed sneaker is made entirely out of ...

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Biggest 3D printed house in the word! 

Do you like the printed "ribbed" look or would you have it rendered lads? 

 

 

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Definitely a smooth finish.

I found a video of a tour of a finished house and I have to say, when I see the interior ribbed finish, I think of scraped elbows, dust accumulation and lots of little nooks for insects where the cabinets, etc., meet the ribbed finish.

I wondered how they would do a basement foundation for us folks in the frozen North and I found that they just do conventional poured concrete.

 

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Dugald Walker

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18 hours ago, dmwalker said:

Definitely a smooth finish.

I found a video of a tour of a finished house and I have to say, when I see the interior ribbed finish, I think of scraped elbows, dust accumulation and lots of little nooks for insects where the cabinets, etc., meet the ribbed finish.

I wondered how they would do a basement foundation for us folks in the frozen North and I found that they just do conventional poured concrete.

 

Ribbed is not for everyone. ( No jokes please  Charlie you naughty boy)

There is a printer head that has a flap that automatically smooths as it prints. That would be my choice too. I guess it would be nice to keep a utility room ribbed to display the construction method. The other method is simply to render afterwards, with a flexible render mix. Flexible to accommodate the micro surface cracks that can occur in concrete. Not that this is basic concrete, its not, it has all manner of  additives included, like carbon fiber for example. The formulae's tend to ne kept secret by each company. Stainless Steel wall tiles are used between the inner an outer leaf of the cavity walls, like we do in the UK with our brick built houses.

As for basements, I'm not surprised they would pour concrete, I wouldn't think you would have room to get the printing frame in place for a basement. Might be wrong. We Brits rarely have basements of course, seems to me that basements are far more common in the US. 

 

Edited by martin-w

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Also, tough to hang pictures on a ribbed or even a smooth concrete wall.


Dugald Walker

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2 hours ago, martin-w said:

seems to me that basements are far more common in the US. 

 

We have a basement.  It's a finished basement with a fireplace and a trundle bed for guests.  Sheet rock walls over the concrete.  My wife has a computer down there and her rocker and TV set in case she wants to watch something different than I am watching in the living room.  I have a hard time with stairs anymore with my balance problem and arthritic feet so she gets complete privacy..

Noel.  


The tires are worn.  The shocks are shot.  The steering is wobbly.  But the engine still runs fine.

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Here in Toronto, we have basements because the footings have to be at least 4 ft deep in order to be below the frostline so it's standard to go the extra depth and have all that extra living space. These days, basements often have their own entrances and their own kitchens and bathrooms so that they can be rented.


Dugald Walker

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16 hours ago, dmwalker said:

Also, tough to hang pictures on a ribbed or even a smooth concrete wall.

 

Nah, you US/Canadian people aren't used to solid walls. 😁

Drill plug screw. We have to do it all the time in the British Isles. Brick is easy, concrete a bit harder to drill but no big deal, SDS drill goes through like butter.

Ribs aren't an issue, just slap some filler in to make a flat spot, drill, plug, screw then hang your favourite photo of Noel shaking hands with a Roswel Alien. 😊

Edited by martin-w

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13 hours ago, dmwalker said:

Here in Toronto, we have basements because the footings have to be at least 4 ft deep in order to be below the frostline so it's standard to go the extra depth and have all that extra living space. These days, basements often have their own entrances and their own kitchens and bathrooms so that they can be rented.

 

Method varies of course but Footings beneath brick cavity walls here are anywhere from one metre to 3 metres, dependant on soil quality. The floors themselves can vary, modern method is concrete suspended beams with blocks between and a concrete layer on top and air bricks under the suspended floor.

Lots of really old houses of course, from a time when insulation and damp prevention wasnt such a priority, Victoria, Edwardian for example, tend to be a soil or gravel sub floor and just floorboards suspended above.

Brick walls have a DPC (Damp Proof Membrane to prevent rising damp up the wall, engineering bricks below, standard bricks above. Polythene damp membranes under the concrete floors. Very old houses have just slate DPM's and no damp membrane under the floor. Very old houses pre 1920 don't have cavity walls, double brick but no cavity.

This will no doubt be unusual to you guys because in North America you have an abundance of trees to build from wood.

Wood is getting a bit more common in the British Isles due to the increase in the number of self builds and effort to build more sustainably. Especially engineered timber, like Gluelam, Panelised Timber Frame etc. There are even houses built from "Hempcrete" these days, great for insulation, resists fire, easy to construct and more sustainable. A few passive houses around now too.

Edited by martin-w

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