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Ha Doc, I beat you to the punch for once!

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I got tired of letting you have all the fun. Here's the latest AVWEB Short Final for everyone:Overheard on Tallahassee Approach during heavy turbulence conditions.TLH Approach: Cessna 12345, state intentions.Pilot: Cessna 12345 intends to land without hurling ... somehow.I have been fortaunte enough to not have any spells of airsickness in flying with the one exception of one day during my basic aerobatics course. It was one of those humid and hot days in the dead of the summer here in OK and I made the mistake of asking my instructor how you demonstrate the dutch roll procedure. He asked, "Are you sure?", and like a dummy I said, "sure, let's try it".For those that are familiar, you need no more explanation most likely, for the rest, I guess I can best sum up the manuever as sickening. Basically the aircraft is banked back and forth while using the rudder to try to keep the nose pointing to the same spot out on the horizon. So you have the entire aircraft swinging left and right while the nose is moving a different direction. Disorienting and nauseating to say the least when mixed with a high incabin temp. Needless to say, that was the first and last 5 minutes I ever did of that exercise. :-erks

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My one and only experience was in spin recovery training in a 152. When my instructor and I pulled out at the bottom, he noticed I was a bit pale. He asked what I had for breakfast that day and determined my blood sugar was low (based on his past experiences). The next time we did that training, I made sure that I ate a bag of M&M's (peanut) on the way to the airport. He was right, no problem this time. The G-forces at the bottom are still an issue, but the nausea was not a problem anymore.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN.

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Yeah, and a stop by your favorite local mexican restaurant is not a good idea for filling the stomach before aerobatics. I saw for myself some of the poor students that ate stuff high in grease come back looking like they were sweating it out of their pores. I learned from their mistakes. :-lol

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Scott:It was pretty easy to beat me to the punch this time. I was in Chicago at a conference. Well, that and getting the Cook's tour of the Museum of Science and Industry.And of course I had to do the Chicago Chop House, the Grill Room (twice!) and Chicago style hot dogs....Ohhhh my.So you've only power painted the panel once? Once a year was more like it around my bunch.Doc Bryant

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That's a nice museum. The tour of the only U-boat captured in WWII is quite informative.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN.

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Sounds like you had a good time. Of course, anytime one can partake in fine cuisine is a good time, right? :-)As far as any "tossing of the cookies" goes, I fortunately didn't even get that far. Nope, once I realized how shaken and stirred I was after the dutch rolls, I informed my instructor it would be in the best interest of both of us to call it a day and commence with the landing pronto. Once on solid ground, a little cool water on the face, I was somewhat back to normal. :-)I really enjoyed everything else we did in the aerobatics intro. Spins didn't bother me. In fact, towards the end of my aerobatics class, I was not only putting the aircraft into a spin, but I was getting better at doing the requested number of spins and recovering and rolling out on the same heading we entered.But my favorite maneuver, believe it or not, became the snap roll. That is got to be one of the most intense feeling, impressive, yet easy to perform maneuvers that one can do. I always wanted to do at least one of those at the end of the lesson before we did the spin to get back down to pattern altitude.I think I could do basic aerobatics on a regular basis, but I know I have little or no desire to do it anywhere lower than about 4000 ft. AGL. :-)

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Use to spin an old dog of a '59 C-172 I had. So much fun, I never missed the chance to do them.Nobody told me that spins kill gyros. So, instead of buying that much needed Nav/Com, I was spending money having instruments overhauled.That ended my days as a 172 stunt pilot.Somewhere around 1978 and about 30 miles DME on the GPT 155 degree radial...a place I surely thought was Heaven http://myweb.cableone.net/joesumralliii/GeoSaxon3a.jpgEventually got that radio and upgraded from those Goodyear wheels and brakes to Clevelands with slightly oversize tires.

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Yeah, the instructor who gave me spin training told the story that there used ONLY one of their 152's for spin training rather than risk the gyros in the 172's which were more for cross-country and IFR training. The gyro would tumble in a spin.Speaking of taking a tumble...I ordered the RV-9 wing kit for delivery in mid-January. The right elevator is now ready for deburring and dimpling in my next session. At 44.2 hours of metal preparations, I still have not installed the first rivet. When I finish the left rudder and trim tab preparations, a day of anti-corrosion spray priming will occur, and then rivets, rivets, rivets!Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN.

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Jerry,What's the current technology for corrosion proofing?Years ago we would acid wash, alodine and then a light "fogging" of Zinc Chromate.I've seen production aircraft, though, with what looks like a coating that might have a hardner...green in color. But, I wouldn't know if zinc was in the coating or if there is Zinc Chromate under it all.Frankly, I like the durability of what I've seen in the production aircraft. A rag moistened with varsol will wash off plain ol' Zink Chromate.What's the story?Who did you recruit to buck those rivets for you?

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That GREEN STUFF you are describing is from Sherwin-Williams, P60G2 Wash Primer, and R7K44 Catalyst Reducer. It is some pretty potent stuff with MEK and an acid in there. It is a self-etching primer put on with an HVLP spray gun while wearing a respirator in a WELL-VENTILATED area (outdoors). It dries quickly and is a good hard coating that will protect everything. I am doing all the insides of my bird, as there is always the possibility that I could take up residence in Florida (again). I am leaving all my options open.As for the rivets, I have not put in the first one yet. I have spent the past 54.8 hours getting everthing prepared for my first spray priming session which could be tomorrow, weather permitting, etc. I am not going to push myself on that one, as there are one or two things left to be done before I go into the spraying.I have spent a lot of time match-drilling parts and skins together and fabricating just a few parts. Now it is just about time to do the priming thing, then the rivets will start getting set at a reasonable pace. I will squeeze as many a possible, then buck the rest myself, since these parts are reachable for one guy with long arms, etc. The partner for bucking comes on the wings, and that will be in January. I gave Van's my depo$it to order the wing kit Wednesday, Nov 6th.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN.

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Van's mailed the wing kit order confirmation via snail mail. They say that they will ship on December 30th. I guess they want to reduce their inventory for tax purposes. It also gets me in under the wire for the price increases that are coming in 2003.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN.

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"Hmmmmm...The're talking about stagflation and the threats of deflation in the US economy and Van's is going up on their prices.Oh well, whatever the market will bear. Isn't that the way it works?Joe Sumrall

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