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Jerry_K_Thorne

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I put in some changes that I had seen on a friend's RV-9A. It will certainly make my life easier in the weeks and years to come with my airplane. You can check it all out at www.n2prise.org on page 95.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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It is all coming along very nicely, Jerry. That fiberglass work looks great. And those rivets are an encouraging sight.Do you have an idea of everything that is still left to do? Or is the list still too long to even contemplate?Best regards.Luis

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Luis,Just answering on the spur of the moment, here are the things that come to mind:1. Finish riveting the forward top skin along the left longeron.2. Put back the coax cable, wires, and static air pressure line on the left side of the fuselage.3. Put the fresh air vents and switch panels back in position on both sides of the panel.4. Put the sliding canopy back in position for mating the windshield properly.5. Trim and install windshield. This will include cleaning the area between the windshield and the edge of the instrument panel for painting with a flat black finish paint.6. Install the "whiskey" compass. That is a traditional wet compass that will live on top of the instrument panel.7. Install the avionics, GPS antenna, and instrument panels again including a pitot line to the wing root.8. Order seats and interior components and install them at the right time.9. Get insurance and take the airplane to the airport.10. Assemble wings and tail feathers.11. Install strobe and marker light assemblies and secure the wing tips to the wings.12. Install the lines to the lift reserve indicator (stall warning device).13. Get transition flight training from the RV factory flight instructor.14. Get the airplane inspected by the FAA designated airworthiness representative (DAR).15. Calibrate fuel gauge readings for both fuel tanks during initial fill up of 2-gallon increments.16. FLY the 40 test hours to verify aircraft performance and calibration of fuel monitors, etc.17. Get the airplane painted sometime in the 40-hour test period by a professional paint shop nearby.I am sure there are a lot of other details that will come out in the process, but those are the major items as I see them at this time. In fact, I just pasted the above posting into a Word document and printed it for future reference.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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>13. Get transition flight training from the RV factory flight>instructor.I doubt you'll need much, as the RV9A is very forgiving, even though performance is sooooooooooooooo much better than a 172! I do remember you getting a bit of time in one, though. During the 25.5 hours we put on the 9A, we tried all kinds of things, such as landing "with" the wind at several different locations including the shorter runway of Skypark; and it does it easily. I never had brakes on my "co-pilot" side, and once aligned with the runway, never needed them at all, as rudder took effect immediately. With the C/S prop, it's great for braking action, and it will drop altitude real fast, but power can always be cut over the threashold, and it doesn't get "heavy" in the flare like the 6A will once and a while. Thanks to the RV, I no longer have much desire to fly a 172, or even a Mooney! ;) My finish list is about the same as yours, except I'll get away with 25 hours (Lycoming engine). But hurry and get your canopy glassed in, and post pics!!!! :7 L.AdamsonP.S. ---- I found that the Alt-Track altitude auto-pilot to be a must have, and hope to get one someday. It can easily be added to your setup. We used this for those long flights to southern Utah, and even while crossing the valley in Class B, at the ATC assigned altitude.

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Larry,I hope to get in one more flight in a 172 tomorrow to stay current before going to Oregon to get transition training. It is primarily for flight insurance reasons, as well as my own peace of mind. And yes, I will probably get the RV training in an RV-6A, not a -9A, so I should be ready for anything.And of course, the web site is updated with new pictures on page 96 and the new page 97.http://www.n2prise.orgJerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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It took 6.3 hours in three work sessions to get the windshield to a point I felt would be a good place to stop. The fit is OK, but I feel that trying to do more would eat up too much of the plexiglass. There is a 1-inch overlap of fiberglass in multiple layers that will cover a "multitude of sins" and provide the secure and smooth fit that is needed to withstand the 194 MPH airspeed the RV-9A is capable of reaching in level flight.http://www.n2prise.org/rv9a097.htm#FEB27Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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And I am working on the spinner after finishing the work on the filtered air box. I needed a break from making plexiglass dust, so the front of the airplane got my attention. The details are on page 98:http://www.n2prise.org/rv9a098.htmJerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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No, I am not taking Karate lessons Pat Morita, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express - - wrong punch line. I spent about half my work time on the airplane today turning the six bolts that secure the prop to the crank shaft flange. You can learn those details at this link.http://www.n2prise.org/rv9a098.htm#March2Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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It has been a while since we have had a peek at your project. Will you let us look in on you?Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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I didn't catch these replies until this evening, and ran out into the garage (without cleaning it!) for a quick pic. Panel pic is a week or so old.Pic 1: Relaced the Garmin 195 which I bought for this plane in 1997 with a Garmin 296. Wonder what kind of GPS it will have when it fly's? :D Pic 2: Replaced the fiberglass spinner with a polished aluminum spinner.......'cause I always thought my prop cutouts were a bit larger than I wanted.L.Adamson

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Where did you get that padding for the edge of the aluminum skin over the instrument panel. I did not see anything like that in the Aircraft Spruce & Specialty catalog. Do you have a part number for that stuff?Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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>Where did you get that padding for the edge of the aluminum>skin over the instrument panel. I did not see anything like>that in the Aircraft Spruce & Specialty catalog. Do you have>a part number for that stuff?>It's rubber hose from Pep Boy's Auto Parts. Somewhere between 3/8 to 1/2" thick before I split it.Off topic, but I just read this AD for new Cessnas. Makes me feel good about "rigging" my own airplane!edit to change link: http://www.cessna.org/public/emergency.pdfL.Adamson

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Thanks for the pix!It looks fast with that polish alu-spinner in the nose.Ok, now i

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Thanks Luis!It looks real nice..I think i have to learn some spanish to..

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Jerry,I've seen page 100, and am eagerly waiting for your fiberglassing results & pics! I'm kind of "chicken" when it comes to applying the messy glass around that expensive canopy!!!! The fiberglass "stuff", is mostly what is left for me. Good luck! :D

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Welcome to the club. I have put it off as long as I can. Time to dive in and just do it!Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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