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LuisFelizTirado

Stepping in again

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Where is Doc when you need him?Overheard in IFR Magazine's "On the Air"I heard someone call Jacksonville Center "Jacksonville approach." When corrected, the pilot apologized.Controller:"I've been called worse."Pilot:"You must be married."Best regards.Luis

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Brother Luis,I have heretofore refrained from posting the IFR magazine stuff since it's already been published. I figure many may have already read the bit so why post it here?Doc Bryant

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Sure, Doc, you are right, but then again I listen to the oldies station on the radio because I like that "blast from the past". But, have you noticed how "oldies" were once from the '60's and are now from the '70's and '80's? Is that one of the 12 sure signs of aging?Best regards.Luis

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It most assuredly is.Hearing something you sang, hummed, whistled or at least shook certain bodily parts to now being labelled "a real golden oldie" hurts almost as much as tests for heart disease and eye examinations that cause you to squint for days afterwards.Another sure sign of aging...you compare prescriptions instead of recipes!Doc Bryant

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Because of the overwhelming amount of response to this topic (Doc!), and by popular request, here areThe 12 sure signs that you are getting oldNumber One: You tune in your oldies station to listen to music from the '50's and '60's, and they are playing disco and rap!Number Two: You compare prescriptions instead of recipes!Number Three: I forget the other 10 signs!Best regards.Luis

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Hey! Watch it!I was that voice on the radio during the summer of 1969 playing the TOP 40 sounds of ROCK & ROLL! The Beach Boys had some "GOOD VIBRATIONS" that "Summer in the City" and I could "REACH OUT" with my 10,000-watt AM transmitter on a clear channel for the first two hours in the morning after sign on. That gig lasted "ALL SUMMER LONG" and for some weekends into the fall when I went back to college. The Beatles did "Strawberry Fields" forever that year.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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That is a heck of a lot of power, Jerry. Was that what Wolfman Jack was using when he was broadcasting from Tijuana? I seem to remember that we could hear his voice all the way to New Jersey on a clear night, if one was willing to stay up late at night just to hear him. I wasn't.Wouldn't it be a blast to have that much power on your airplane radio? You could talk to Caracas tower all the way from Tennessee.Best regards.Luis

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But I would not be able to hear them. Not to mention that I would not be able to get off the ground with that big a transmitter aboard. It would take a 747 to lift that much weight.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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Ahh, Wolfman Jack's radio station XERF-AM in Cuidad Acuna only had one RCA 250,000 watt transmitter. There was some mention back then of XERF going to 500,000 watts, but they never did.And I don't think Jerry's plane, nice as it is, could lift a 500K transmitter, much less power it!But think of the coverage area? One other thing that helped XERF was the fact that it was on a clear channel, not used by US AM radio stations.I don't know if any AM stations are allocated "clear channels" these days. I remember WOWO and one Chicago AM station both came in loud and clear in Central Pennsylvania. WOWO I think was Fort Wayne, Indiana.If my memories are correct......I so remember AM radio....Some stations were authorized dawn to dusk, and at night, they would sign off. Others would change their antenna orientation to aim their signals differently from their daylight orientation, to avoid wiping out smaller AM stations on the same frequency. And a few, precious few, actually boosted power at night.Doc Bryant

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Yes, yes! I remember now. Thank you.Number Three Sure Sign that You are Getting OldYou remember A.M. radio and 8 track tapes!And thanks for the information about the Wolfman, a lot of things I never knew. So, if I understand correctly, transmitters that size were forbidden in the Continental U.S. and that is why the Wolfman went down Mexico way. Smart move, I suppose.Best regards.Luis

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I do indeed remember AM radio...and listening to KDKA-AM, "Group W Broadcasting.....First In the nation, KDKA-AM Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania!"And not only do I recall 8 tracks, I remember a "LearJet" 8 track in the dash of a beautiful 1967 Cadillac Eldorado in Firemist Blue.And the "cart" a derivation of the 8 track used in radio stations for commercials, jingles and other frequently played things. As Jerry was a disc jockey, in college I worked for our college radio station, mostly in news and announcing. Not that I had the dulcet voice of some of our people.I do not know if transmitters like the Wolfman's station used in Mexico were forbidden here, but the Federal Communications Commission regulated very tightly the ERP (effective radiated power) of a station by both it's antenna structure/propagation pattern and the power of the station's transmitter.I could rattle off all that stuff when I had my FCC 3rd Class radiotelephone license, Broadcast endorsed, but it's been eons since that expired!Doc Bryant

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Is this some kind of propinquity? (Whatever that means!)I too was in college radio - WHPK (Hyde Park - 10 watts!), the University of Chicago station as Technical Manager. I too had my 3rd class licence, and it too expired a long, long time ago.I didn't realize that so many went through the college radio experience. Strange coincidence.Best regards.Luis

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OK. Make that 3-for-3 on the college radio thing. My commercial radio gig was before helping start up the college radio station at Southern Tech, Marietta, Georgia.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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So this means that you were into radio from the start, Jerry, and continued as a profession? I guess you have seen some changes, especially with all this satellite radio stuff.Best regards.Luis

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The commercial radio thing was just a summer job in college. I realized that I would be better off using my electrical engineering degree rather that my ruby-throated voice. I had seen a lot of DJ's that worked in small towns and only a few big names at the clear-channel stations and FM radio stations in the big cities making any money in radio.All that other stuff I have been doing for the past 37 years since I stopped shuffling IBM cards for the US Army. I worked for the world's largest cable television manufacturing company, a pair of satellite equipment manufacturing companies (receiving systems and uplinks, not spacecraft), Comcast Cable back when they only had 65 cable systems across the USA, a CATV sales company from the Atlanta area (covering Florida), a small cable TV amplifier company in Jupiter, Florida, then an IP computer oriented company that wanted to build a GIG-E network on coaxial cable networks, another amplifier and cable accessory company, and now a small family-owned fiber optics equipment company.I have always lived in Georgia, Florida, and now 1/2 mile across the Georgia-Tennessee state line on the Tennessee side, not far from where I grew up in Dalton, Georgia. The year I was in Korea in the army was the only time I did not live in the southeastern USA.Jerry K. ThorneEast Ridge, TN

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