• Angle of Attack 777 Training


    Chase

    <p><em>A review by Marlon Carter.</em></p><p></p><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/GoldStarAward.jpg"></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Review%20Picture.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Review%20Picture.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p><strong>INTRODUCTION</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AOA%20777.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AOA%20777.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>Angle of Attack is well known for their excellent training videos. With the release of the PMDG 777, AOA has been hard at work producing one of the best training programs to date. With this new program, the approach is quite similar to the NGX Training where the training is broken down into three main sections. These sections include Get Started, Ground Work and Flight Work.</p> <p> </p> <p>Before we dive right into the review, I thought it would be a good idea to have a chat with Chris Palmer about his latest training series.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Chris, can you tell us what inspired you to develop the 777 Training program?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>“Truth is, I have personally always been in love with the 777. It came to the market just as I was becoming aware of airplanes as a child. At the end of the day, it was the fact that PMDG was doing the 777 that got us to do the training for this aircraft. My personal love for the aircraft was just icing on the cake, as I'm sure it was for many other people. And more recently, I saw the series on PBS from when the 777 was made called "21st Century Jet". To this date, it's one of my most favorite documentaries of all time. The only jet to ever be on time, on schedule, and on budget. Boy, has she been a beautiful airplane all these years!”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Is the 777 Training any different to the NGX Training that was previously released?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>“Yes, there are differences in each and every course we offer. First of all, it's a new airplane. There are new things to learn, different systems, and overall a new mindset. Additionally, each product we make means a step up in quality of production. This 777 Training is the best video training our team has ever created. It's top-notch, airline quality training. I give all the credit to our incredible team for putting this together. They've done an incredible job putting their own heart, soul and creativity into this training to make it absolutely stunning, entertaining, if not already educational.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>At what point would you consider the 777 Training program “complete”? Will new material be added in the months or perhaps years to come?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>“At the release of this review, the 777 Training will be fully complete. That doesn't mean that we won't add fun things now and again. We tend to do that here and there, in addition to offering our trainees other benefits. Along this same vein, when you sign up for our 777 Training, you get access to the streaming versions of the videos forever. That means that you can come back regularly and freshen up on your skills. In that sense, the training never really ends. These videos simply keep paying back. There's an incredible amount of information to gain from its contents. Just as it's impossible to read the Bible and understand every concept, the same can be likened to the 777 Training or training on any aircraft for that matter.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Most advanced add-ons such as the PMDG 777 include an extensive manual. What role do these videos play in the learning process? Is it complimentary or a substitute?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>“You know, these days we are simply running low on time. I have found that most flight simmers are dads, students or guys with careers that allow them very little time to sit down and learn an airplane. It may be bold to say, but I see little use in reading through a full manual on the aircraft. Our video training takes our pilots through a more regular course that pilots would go through to get trained on the real aircraft. In summary, flight simmers have little time to learn the airplane is such depth as reading thousands of pages. They DO have time to go through condensed and powerful videos. In my eyes, the videos are a replacement. Add on the manuals if you have extra time, but I don't know many people that have that amount of time. I know I sure don't with all the things going on in my life.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Is there anything in particular you would like potential customers to know about the 777 Training that would make it worth their while?</p> <p> </p> <p>“When I look at how we as flight simmers approach such a complex aircraft, I have to ask myself if we are all approaching this hobby realistically. We strive for a few extra frames by spending hours tweaking an aircraft.cfg in FSX. We buy a weather add-on that will depict things with almost 100% accuracy. We spend hundreds of dollars to make sure our rivers and roads are depicted realistically in our scenery across the world. Yet, when the majority of people approach these complex jets that they've always dreamed of flying, they leave the 'realism' idea behind, and simply jump in. The truth is, one of the best ways to get the most out of your simulation is to DECIDE TO TAKE IT SERIOUSLY. Treat your flights as if they are real flights. Do things safely as if there are passengers relying on you to get them home to their families safely. To do this, pilots need training. You cannot get by with manuals. Real pilots don't do it, we can't do it. Pilots are shown how to do it through extensive flight instruction, and years of experience. A flight simmer approach to training must be much the same- take it seriously, do it with hands on, visual training- and get LOTS of experience.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Here is a preview that shows the quality of training you can expect:</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="center" width="300"> <p style="text-align: center"><iframe frameborder="0" height="169" src= "//www.youtube.com/embed/qOm1oBD6eQ0?rel=0" width= "300"></iframe></p> </td> <td valign="center" width="300"> <p style="text-align: center"><iframe frameborder="0" height="169" src= "//www.youtube.com/embed/KsP9QLSbtps?rel=0" width= "300"></iframe></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p><strong>GETTING STARTED</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/GET1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_GET1.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>As you would expect, this section contains all of the information and downloadable files that will be required for your training. Accessing this section takes you to files such as 777 Panel diagrams, 777 EZCA camera files and an optional 777 Angle of Attack livery for your new PMDG777. For me personally, the most useful of these files were the EZCA camera sets that allows you to navigate to various parts of the cockpit with ease.</p> <p> </p> <p>As far as the AOA livery is concerned, the quality is top notch and I would recommend giving it a try.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>GROUNDWORK</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Ground%20Work.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Ground%20Work.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>For any pilot, learning to fly a new aircraft can be quite a challenge. Before ever setting foot inside of the cockpit, most pilots spend many hours learning the various systems and characteristics of the aircraft either in a classroom or a combination of classroom and simulator based training. The Ground Work section of the PMDG 777 Training follows a very similar pattern.</p> <p> </p> <p>Long before you experience a long haul flight in the 777, groundwork will expose you to hours of systems training that will blow you mind! What can you expect to learn in this section? Well, here is a list of all the ground work items you are expected to be familiar with prior to the flight work section.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Lighting.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Lighting.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Caution.jpg"><img alt= "" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Caution.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Aircraft Lighting</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Caution & Warning</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/TCAS.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_TCAS.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Fire.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Fire.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Ice.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Ice.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Terrain & Traffic</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Fire Protection</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Ice & Rain Protection</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Hydraulic.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Hydraulic.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/HLC.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_HLC.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Hydraulics</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Primary Flight Controls</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 High Lift Controls</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Gear.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Gear.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Engines.jpg"><img alt= "" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Engines.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/APU.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_APU.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Landing Gear and Brakes</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Engines</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 APU</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Bleed%20Air.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Bleed%20Air.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Air.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Air.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Electrical.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Electrical.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Bleed Air</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Air Conditioning & Pressurization</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Electrical</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center"> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Fuel.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Fuel.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Instruments.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Instruments.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FMS.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FMS.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Fuel</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Cockpit Instruments</p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center">777 Autoflight & FMS</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>From this extensive listing, it’s clear to see that the Ground Work section will occupy much of your time for the next few days, if not weeks of your 777 Training. Most videos are over 30mins long with some being over an hour in length. For your convenience, all videos are available for download in HD and SD format.</p> <p> </p> <p>In addition to this, you can also download the transcripts for the lessons being viewed in order to follow along or to save as your personal reference notes.</p> <p> </p> <p>Due to the extensive nature of each video, for this review we will have an in-depth look at only five (5) videos as a preview for what you can expect from this superb training series.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>ENGINES</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENGINE%202.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENGINE%202.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>Let’s get started with the 777 Engines lesson. Did you know that the 777 sports one the largest and most powerful turbo fan engines in the world? With that said it is only obvious that as a pilot, it is expected that you should have an in-depth knowledge of how your engines are designed and how they are operated. In this lesson we will be covering topics such as;</p> <p> </p> <ul> <li>777 Engines System Overview</li> <li>Engine Fuel System</li> <li>Engine Oil System</li> <li>Starting and ignition procedures</li> <li>Thrust reversers</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p>Beginning with the system overview, we focus our attention on the history and design of these powerful GE engines. To compliment this part of the presentation, animated diagrams nicely illustrate the two stages of Primary airflow and Secondary airflow.</p> <p> </p> <p>Paying close attention to this lesson will definitely aid in understanding the inner working of a jet engine and which of the airflows is primarily responsible for generating thrust. Going into further detail, you will also learn more about the various turbines and compressors that are responsible for the efficient operation of the engines. One might think that the engines are only responsible for generating thrust, but as you will soon learn in this lesson, the engines are also crucial to the operation of other aircraft systems.</p> <p> </p> <p>To wrap up the discussion on engine thrust, we jump into the cockpit for an explanation of the engine instruments and how they accurately indicate the limits and operation of the engines.</p> <p> </p> <p>The fuel system within the engines of the 777 serves mainly two purposes. First, it is used for combustion and it is also used for cooling the oil. How? Well the oil in an engine can reach very high temperatures as it does its work during normal operation. As the oil passes through the heat exchanger, the oil is cooled by the fuel and interestingly, the fuel is also warmed for better combustion. The benefit to the oil is most welcome, but the warming of the fuel for combustion is equally important. An aircraft that is flying at high altitude is left exposed to extremely low temperatures for hours at a time. To prevent waxing of the fuel, the heat exchanger keeps the fuel at a temperature higher than its surroundings.</p> <p> </p> <p>Other specifics that are covered about the fuel system within the engines are instrument indications and schematics related to the fuel cut-off controls located in the cockpit. While the fuel system of the 777 is fully covered in another lesson, this preview is sufficient to understanding the basic functions of fuel within the engines of the 777.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENG1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENG1.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"> </p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENG2.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENG2.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENG3.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENG3.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENG4.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENG4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/ENG5.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_ENG5.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>Now that we’ve covered the fuel system of the GE-90, it is crucial that we also understand the importance of the oil system. In this section of our lesson we focus on the primary function of oil within the engine. The main purpose of the oil system is to provide pressurized oil to lubricate the gears and drives within the engine.</p> <p> </p> <p>As was mentioned earlier, there is also a secondary function for the oil system in that it provides heat to the fuel for better combustion. The engine indications in the cockpit clearly display the oil temperature, pressure and quantity to the pilot and it is vital that we understand how to read any adverse conditions within the oil system. Should there be an adverse change in any of engine oil parameters, the indications will change from a “white on black” to a “black on white” display of the numeric values.</p> <p> </p> <p>To nicely compliment this presentation, there is also a diagram that illustrates how the indications in the cockpit relate to flow and operation of the oil system within the engines.</p> <p> </p> <p>The next section of this video brings us to the start and ignition procedures of the GE-90. After covering the sequence of events associated with an engine start, we head over to the cockpit for a presentation on how the start sequence is controlled and monitored. An intriguing aspect of this lesson was learning that not all 777 engine variants can be started in the same way.</p> <p> </p> <p>For example, some engine variants allow for both engines to be started at the same time, but the GE-90 was not designed to do so. Another point of interest was the presentation on sequence of events taking place within the engine during an AUTOSTART. In older model aircraft it was crucial that pilots add fuel to the engines at the right time to avoid a “hot start.”</p> <p> </p> <p>In the 777, the AUTOSTART feature controls the fuel valves during the start-up and the EEC (Electronic Engine Control) will only open it when the engines is turning at the required speed. Also, should any parameters be exceeded during the start, the EEC will abort the engine start sequence. Does this mean that pilot monitoring during the start-up process is no longer required? Not at all, in fact, since the EEC does not monitor oil pressure and temperature, it is still the pilot’s responsibility to ensure that the oil system is functioning properly.</p> <p> </p> <p>The function of the EEC is quite impressive and throughout this lesson you will see why this unit is virtually indispensable. One of the features I thought was very impressive comes into action during the in-flight start-up procedure. While an in-flight start-up is possible with the 777, it is generally recommended that you descend to a lower altitude to do the air density being lower at high altitudes. The EEC comes to the rescue by displaying the recommended altitude and airspeed range for a restart.</p> <p> </p> <p>Finally, we will be looking at the thrust reverser of the GE-90 engines. When it comes to slowing down an aircraft as large as the 777, thrust reversers play a crucial role. Just as spoilers are most effective at higher speeds, thrust reversers are also most effective at higher speeds. The use of reverse thrusters is limited to ground operations and there are a host of safety features that prevents any unwanted deployment in-flight or otherwise.</p> <p> </p> <p>This section of the engine lesson also covers how the thrust reversers work in harmony with the spoilers in various situations such as a rejected takeoff. Other items discussed included EICAS messages and operational limits of the thrust reversers while on the ground.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the end, you will be quite impressed with this presentation and it will no doubt boast your confidence in properly operating these powerful engines.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>HYDRAULICS</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/H1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_H1.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>The next lesson we will examine is the 777 Hydraulics lesson. The hydraulic system of the 777 is essential to the operation of many aircraft components such as the landing gears and control surfaces. To help us have a better understanding of this system, this lesson starts off with an introduction to hydraulic systems and its components. Starting with the basic laws of physics to basic components that make up a hydraulic system, you will surely benefit from this presentation.</p> <p> </p> <p>After the basics have been covered we move on to an overview of the 777 hydraulic systems. The 777 hydraulic systems comprise of three (3) independent systems which operate the primary flight controls, landing gear, thrust reversers, main landing gear braking, main and nose gear steering, leading edge slats and trailing edge flaps. These systems are referred to as the Left, Center and Right hydraulic system and while the schematics of these systems may be very complicated, AOA has managed to illustrate these systems in a series of logical and easy to follow presentations.</p> <p> </p> <p>Will it be worth your while to fully understand all of these systems? Well considering the fact that each hydraulic system powers specific aircraft components, understanding what each systems does may be a matter of life and death in the event of a failure of any of these systems.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/H2.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_H2.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/H3.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_H3.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/H4.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_H4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/H5.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_H5.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>As an example, the left hydraulic system powers the Left and Right Outboard Elevators and Ailerons, Rudder Middle Power Control Unit, Spoilers 2,4,11 and 13, Left Outboard Flaperons and the left engine thrust reverser. Should there be a significant failure of this system, knowing the aircraft components that will be affected will significantly increase your chances of landing the aircraft safely.</p> <p> </p> <p>While the schematics of these systems are covered in detail throughout this lesson, there are also presentations that focus on cockpit controls such as the overhead hydraulic panel. These presentations bring an awareness of what each switch does in their selectable positions. Knowing how to operate the hydraulic system from the cockpit is a crucial part of pilot training since hydraulic failures are quite common even in modern aircraft.</p> <p> </p> <p>Should there be a scenario where both engines have failed and the pressure in all three hydraulic systems are low, the Ram Air Turbine will automatically become operational. The RAT supplies emergency power to the hydraulic systems to operate flight controls that are connected to the Center hydraulic system.</p> <p> </p> <p>This is another example of how crucial it can be for a pilot to know which flight controls are powered by the Center hydraulic systems and which are not!</p> <p> </p> <p>Finally, to wrap up our discussion of the hydraulic system there is a final presentation on cockpit indications related to the hydraulic system and how a failure of any system can be easily identified. The information presented in this lesson may take a while to sink in but in the end you will be intrigued with the hidden complexity of this aircraft.</p> <p> </p> <p>You will also have a profound appreciation for the hard work of PMDG in modeling this system to such a high degree of accuracy.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>PRIMARY FLIGHT CONTROLS</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC1.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>After discussing the hydraulic systems that power control surface and other components, it is only fitting that we examine the 777 Primary Flight Controls lesson. As a pilot, it is crucial that you have an understanding of how the primary flight controls work and are operated. While the 777 is very automated, your interaction with the aircraft will be mainly centered on the manipulation of the primary flight controls.</p> <p> </p> <p>For this lesson we will be covering topics such as 777 PFC system, System modes, Pitch control, Roll control, Yaw control and envelope protection features and finally, we will be covering the various controls and indicators used to operate the various Pct.</p> <p> </p> <p>To begin our lesson on the Primary Flight Controls, we start off with an overview of basic theory of flight concepts. In order to fully understand how the components of the PFCs operate, it is important that you understand the 3 axes of flight. These axes include the lateral, longitudinal and vertical axis which intersects at the aircraft’s center of gravity.</p> <p> </p> <p>Movement throughout the lateral axis is called pitch while movement through the longitudinal and vertical axis is referred to as roll and yaw respectively. In order to control this movement, two categories of flight controls are utilized and they include the primary flight controls and the secondary flight controls. Secondary flight controls are extensively covered in another video so we will be focusing mainly on the Pct.</p> <p> </p> <p>The primary flight control used to adjust pitch; roll and yaw are the elevators, ailerons and the rudder. While many aircraft were designed with mechanical linkages to these control surfaces, the 777 was designed using the fly-by-wire concept which was used exclusively for military aircraft. The basic idea behind this concept is that pilot input is relayed electronically to flight control computers. These computers later produce more electronic pulses that operate hydraulic actuators on various control surfaces.</p> <p> </p> <p>Reading about this may difficult to swallow at first, but the animated diagrams that have been prepared by AOA helps us to visualize this concept perfectly.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC2.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC2.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC3.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC3.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC4.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/PFC5.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_PFC5.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>There are many benefits to using fly-by-wire and these include having an efficient aircraft structural design, minimal mechanical components, better fuel economy due to lower aircraft weight and the possibility of introducing flight-envelope protection features. While many of the benefits of fly-by-wire are easily understood, the last feature may be a new concept for us all. Thankfully this new concept was thoroughly explained and I think you will enjoy this feature of the 777 very much.</p> <p> </p> <p>The flight envelope protection features that were implemented are able to process pilot inputs and limit control surface displacement to protect the aircraft from dangerous situations. The three main flight envelope protection features for manual and auto-flight include stall, over speed and bank angle. Interestingly, you would be surprised to know that despite this protection, the pilot still maintains authority over the aircraft so the computers do not have sole authority.</p> <p> </p> <p>Moving on to the PFC modes, you will also learn about the differences between the NORMAL, SECONDARY and DIRECT modes of the PFC. Why are these modes so important? Normally the 777 PFC systems operate in the NORMAL mode.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the Normal mode, pilot input is feed to the Actuator Control Electronic Computers (ACEC) and then to flight computers which calculate the required control surface movement. There are various systems that are operative in the Normal mode such as the speed brakes and flight protection envelope. If there is a failure in the system, the mode switches from NORMAL to SECONDARY. This means that the flight computers calculate simpler commands without the aid of airspeed data and the aircraft must be flown cautiously due to the fact that flight envelope protection and yaw damping is either limited or no longer available.</p> <p> </p> <p>The final mode is probably the most challenging. In the Direct mode, pilot input is directly sent to the control surfaces via the ACEC without any input calculations from the flight control computers. While all of this sound very technical and innovative, it was even more so surprising to know that the PMDG777 has modeled all of these functionalities.</p> <p> </p> <p>There is much more to learn about the functions of the PFCs and this lesson will provide a wide array of detailed presentations that will expand your knowledge. Viewing this lesson just once may not be enough to fully comprehend this system and I would also encourage you to consult the PMDG manual for further details. In the end, you will be filled with awe at the complexity behind the seeming simple takes of flying this aircraft.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>AUTOFLIGHT</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FMS1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FMS1.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>One of the most important lessons you will want to pay close attention to is the 777 Autoflight & FMS lesson. For the next 45 minutes or so, you will be consumed with enough information on the auto flight & FMS systems and components to elevate your confidence in flying the 777 by 100%. Here you will learn about FMC components, ADIRU’s, GPS, the Autopilot Flight Director System and Auto-throttles.</p> <p> </p> <p>To get things started, we begin by covering the basics of the FMS. This introduction focuses on the data used by the FMC to follow both LNAV and VNAV paths once they are engaged. The FMC is the focal point of the navigation system onboard the 777 and it helps to optimize fuel burn, performance and direct routes. While it is the focal point and the brain of the aircraft, it is only as “smart” as the information entered by the pilot.</p> <p> </p> <p>On the matter of entering data, the next segment will be useful to persons who are not familiar with the Boeing style FMC. For those of you who are familiar with the FMC (Or perhaps you think you are), you will be quite humbled by the added insight you will gain in this lesson. The FMC segment focuses on each key and their function and this includes all of the menu buttons and subpages.</p> <p> </p> <p>Going into further detail we later examine the Air Data Inertia Reference System and the SAARU. The ADIRS is responsible for calculating the aircraft’s position, altitude, speed and attitude for the FMC and other systems. The SAARU serves as a backup to the ADIRS in the event of a failure and when active, it functions similarly to the ADIRS but with no inertial position information.</p> <p> </p> <p>While you may assume that learning these systems may not be relevant, the functions of these units are all modeled and if they are not aligned or operated correctly your flight from JFK-LHR may not turn out so well.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AF1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AF1.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"> </p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AF2.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AF2.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AF3.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AF3.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AF4.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AF4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/AF5.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_AF5.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>The flight director system of the 777 is an essential part of the auto flight system and based on the information that is placed in the MCP, the FD will generate command bars on the PFD. These bars show where you should pitch and roll the airplane to maintain your selected modes in the MCP. Again, it cannot be stressed how important it is for pilot to fully understand this system as it can easily lead fatal errors.</p> <p> </p> <p>One of the segments of this video I enjoyed the most covered the use and functions of the MCP. With an aircraft like the PMDG 777, most users will be flying with the autopilot engaged 90% of the time and understanding it is operated will be a valuable asset. In this segment we focus on the differences between the data that is entered into the MCP and what is displayed on the Flight Mode Annunciator (FMA). I thought it was quite interesting to learn that we don’t always receive what we ask for when it comes to the various modes of the MCP.</p> <p> </p> <p>For example, when a mode such as auto land is selected, it is not always instantly engaged. Until the aircraft is in a position to intercept the glideslope or localizer; this mode will be armed rather than engaged. How do you tell the difference? Well the indications on the FMA will depict the status of modes that have been selected and it’s up to you as the pilot to know how these indications are interpreted.</p> <p> </p> <p>In the end, I can only say that this presentation is by far one of the most insightful training videos that cover a way range of topics related to the auto flight systems of an aircraft. If you are interested in learning more about your 777 autopilot, this lesson is definitely for you!</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>ELECTRICAL</strong></p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/E1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_E1.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>Finally, let’s have a look at the 777 Electrical lessons. This is a lesson you definitely should not overlook. While learning about the hydraulics, PFC, Engines and Autoflight systems may seem intriguing, it would all amount to nothing if you didn’t know how to power up the 777. In this lesson we will be covering an overview of the electrical system, External Power, AC electrical power, DC electrical power and the Backup and Standby Electrical Power.</p> <p> </p> <p>I must admit that I have always shied away electrical systems due to its complexity at time. However, the 777’s electrical system is highly automated and pilot friendly. With this in mind, you will find that the information discussed in this lesson will be easy to comprehend since it focuses on an overview of the electrical system and information that is relevant to the pilot.</p> <p> </p> <p>The key to understanding the 777 electrical systems can be summed up in a four (4) step process. This process follows the order of electrical Requirements, Generation, Distribution and Safeguards.</p> <p> </p> <p>The B777 uses electrical power to operate the avionics, FBW components, Lights, Motors and much more. This means that each of these items require a specific electrical power supply to operate correctly. This is where Ground power, AC and DC power systems plays vital role but this power has to be generated somehow.</p> <p> </p> <p>When a pilot boards the 777 for the first flight of the day it is likely that he will find the aircraft in a cold and dark condition. What many of you may not have known is that the aircraft is never in a fully cold and dark condition. Certain essential electrical circuits are actively powered by the main battery through the hot battery bus.</p> <p> </p> <p>In case you are wondering what on earth a bus, it’s basically a long strip of metal that connects a battery or generator to all the circuits of an airplane. A hot battery bus means that the circuit is always active. Why is there a need to have a hot battery bus? Well there are certain aircraft systems that such as the APU and Engine Fire Extinguisher and the ADIRU’s that should always be powered in the event of an emergency.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/E2.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_E2.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/E3.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_E3.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/E4.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_E4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/E5.jpg"><img alt="" src="http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_E5.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>To power up the 777, the ground power can used to provide electrical power to various systems. This segment covers the ground power unit (GPU) and its operation in great detail and I am sure you will benefit from learning how this system works as I have.</p> <p> </p> <p>Another source of electrical power is the AC electrical system. AC power comes from the engines and generators onboard the aircraft and it is perfect for handling heavy electrical loads. Following the (4) step process, this video covered the requirements, source of generation, distribution and safeguards of this system.</p> <p> </p> <p>The DC system is powered by the battery and the AC system via the Transformer Rectifier Units (TRU). Why is there a need for DC power? The simple answer to this question is that certain systems of the aircraft have varying requires as far as power is concerned. In addition to this certain components of the 777 such as the flight instruments and FBW system are powered directly by the battery. The reason for this is that in emergency situations such as a complete loss of the AC system, the aircraft’s instruments and FBW systems will continue to function.</p> <p> </p> <p>Other aspects of the DC system that are covered in this lesson focus on the distribution and safeguards of this system that you will surely find intriguing.</p> <p> </p> <p>The final segment of this lesson focuses on the Backup & Standby Power system and it follows the same four (4) step process to understanding the intricacies of these systems. In the end, you will be very impressed with the high quality presentations that make the seemingly complex layout of the B777 electrical system so easy to understand.</p> <p> </p> <p>From the highlights of the five (5) videos we examined, it is clear to see that these training videos have a lot to offer. The quality of these lessons and the practical examples given makes ground training an enjoyable process. As in the real world, after the ground training has been completed, it’s now time to put what we would have learned into practice in either the simulator or the real aircraft and this brings us to Flight Work!</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>FLIGHTWORK</strong></p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW1.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW2.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW2.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW3.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW3.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW4.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW4.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW5.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW5.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/FW6.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_FW6.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>Now that you’re acquainted with the systems of the 777, it’s time to put that knowledge to work on a series of short, medium and long haul flights. Flight Work allows you to experience the 777 as never before by applying many of the lessons learned in the Ground Work section to flight scenarios that encompass live ATC, real weather and real aerodrome procedures. Here is a breakdown of what you can expect in the Flight Work section.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Flight #1</strong></p> <p>Short Haul to Medium / 8 Hours or Less</p> <p>Dubai to Amsterdam</p> <p>(OMDB-EHAM)</p> <p> </p> <p>Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, is largely considered to be the center of business in the Middle East. Over the last 15 years, Dubai has experienced an incredible and unprecedented growth, which only seems to be accelerating. Although most of the industry was backboned on oil, it is largely and a majority of tourism, finance, and other business in today’s world. This means people from all corners of the world are converging on Dubai, making it a very popular destination for the 777.</p> <p> </p> <p>This Oasis of a city is not only incredibly new, beautiful, and fashionable, but sitting on the ramp at Dubai International brings with it eye candy that would make any aviation geek slobber with delight. Eccentric tastes and lifestyles deserve beautiful aircraft along with them.</p> <p> </p> <p>Amsterdam, quite an old city, and certainly opposite in climate, is our destination on the short 6.5 hour journey from Dubai. Amsterdam is notorious for its artistic-rich culture; it’s well kept streets, and iconic sub-sea level channels making for a popular tourism spot.</p> <p> </p> <p>Not only does is Amsterdam thick with culture, but the Dutch are an aviation loving people. With the iconic KLM airlines, commercial aviation here is as old as the jet age itself. Nearly every aircraft has seen regular service in this area, and the 777 is certainly not an exception.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Flight #2</strong></p> <p>Long Haul / 8 Hours to 15 Hours</p> <p>Paris to San Francisco</p> <p>(LFPG-KSFO)</p> <p> </p> <p>This flight got a tremendous amount of votes, and was voted higher than any other flight we suggested. Paris, much like Amsterdam, and perhaps to a whole new level, is thick with fashion and artistic culture. The city, and its country, have always been diverse in many ways but certainly always known for the finer things in life. Aviation here too has nearly always been a way of life since powered flight.</p> <p> </p> <p>On May 21st, 1927, Charles Lindbergh completed the first Transatlantic flight, landing in Paris. “But suddenly, a hysterical, ecstatic crowd broke through the restraining ropes and stampeded toward him, cheering and shouting. As he opened the door, he was lifted down and hoisted onto the shoulders of the police, who carried him through the surging crowd, cries of “Vive” ringing through the night. He had conquered the Atlantic alone, covering 3,610 miles in 33 1/2 hours.”</p> <p> </p> <p>Not to mention the support of Air France for the Concorde, and the birth of Airbus. San Francisco, many hundreds or even thousands of years younger than Paris, is well known for its ‘silicon valley’ and high-tech industries. When you want to start a technology business, this seems to still be one of the major hotspots to incubate a startup. Home to Apple Computer and Intel Processors, just to name a very large and noticeable few, it’s no wonder why.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Flight #3</strong></p> <p>Ultra-Long Haul / 15 hours or More</p> <p>New York to Hong Kong</p> <p>(KJFK-VHHH)</p> <p> </p> <p>New York nearly speaks for itself. The famous entry to and the epitome of American Life. Millions of immigrants have passed through Ellis Island, and many more millions of visitors have walked it’s streets, taken a stroll in Central Park, or have taken pictures from the top of the Empire State Building. Of course, New York isn’t all about fun and tourism. Business and the economy is serious business here. This is the financial capital of America, after all, with the New York Stock Exchange and countless large corporations calling it home.</p> <p> </p> <p>Hong Kong, also a booming and quite diverse metropolis, has seen incredible growth over the last decades. As China has risen as an economic power, much of that process revolves around Hong Kong as a driving force to the economy, not so much in products made, but in deals made.</p> <p> </p> <p>This route is particularly interesting because it is so long, in addition to being a Polar Route, or a route flown over a pole (the North Pole in this case). That makes for some very interesting operational procedures.</p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dubai%20Flight%20Photo.jpg"><img alt= "" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dubai%20Flight%20Photo.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p>Since these flights are very detailed and lengthy, we will examine 1 of these lessons to see what Flight Work has to offer.</p> <p> </p> <p>The first flight under the Flight Work section features a flight from Dubai to Amsterdam. At the beginning of this video, Nick Collett greets us on the flight deck of a cold and dark B777. If you are not familiar with Nick Collett he is by no means a stranger to the world of aviation.</p> <p> </p> <p>Nick Collett is a real world ATPL pilot and he has also assisted with the 737NGX Training program. In this video Nick takes us through the Scan Flows that commonly done before the pre-flight flows. Performing the Scan Flow is essential for every pilot since it will alert you to anything that is out of place or switches and selectors that are in the incorrect position prior to power-up.</p> <p> </p> <p>In everyday operations, it is not very common for a flight crew to full power-up an aircraft unless it is the very first flight of the day after an aircraft has rested at a particular destination. All things considered, it should take an experienced pilot only a few minutes to perform these scans. In our case, covering these scans will take us close to 50 minutes as Nick takes us thoroughly through each scan item while providing supplementary information as to how these systems work and are operated.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="width:638px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub1.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub1.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub2.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub2.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub3.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub3.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub4.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub4.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub5.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub5.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub6.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub6.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub7.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub7.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>After the Scan Flows were completed, we move on to the Pre-flight flows. The actions and commentary associated with these flows follow a similar pattern to the Scan Flows. Each item is thoroughly discussed and by using EZCA it was easy follow along as Nick navigated his way around the virtual cockpit. The entire process felt remarkably realistic and it is guaranteed to make you feel like you are in the real cockpit with an experienced training captain as he shows you the ropes.</p> <p> </p> <p>Now for the part that everyone has been eagerly anticipating, the FMS setup. Setting up the FMS may seem like fairly simple task but I am almost certain that after viewing this video, you will soon realize that you may have been doing it all wrong or you may have missed a few steps. After the FMS was properly setup and instruments were checked, it was now time for the departure briefing.</p> <p> </p> <p>The departure briefing was professionally done and it covered all aspects of the departure from taxi to emergency procedures. This level of professionalism is by no means going “over the top,” on the other hand; this is the type of realism that should be encouraged within the flight sim community in order to truly experience the routines and procedures involved with a flight of this nature.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub10.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub10.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"> </p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub11.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub11.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub12.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub12.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub13.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub13.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub14.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub14.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub15.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub15.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub16.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub16.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub17.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub17.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub18.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub18.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub19.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub19.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub20.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub20.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>After spending close to $90 for the PMDG 777, it would be quite a waste if each flight involved a mediocre attempt at realism. The PMDG 777 is a highly complex aircraft geared at individuals who want the most out of their flight sim experience and throughout this video you will be blown away by what you may have been missing out on!</p> <p> </p> <p>At this point in the video, it was hard to imagine that we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg. The learning continues as we obtain our pushback and taxi clearance for our departure to Amsterdam. As we taxi to the runway, Nick walks us through the Electronic Checklist items associated with the taxi, takeoff and climb phase of our flight.</p> <p> </p> <p>During the cruise portion, as we slowly approach our TOD, Nick continues to share some of the “hidden” treasures of the PMDG 777 that highlights the level of realism that can be experienced with this aircraft. For example, when the seatbelt sign is in the AUTO position, the sign is turned on automatically when the aircraft passes 10,000ft.</p> <p> </p> <p>In an aircraft as large as the 777, this may not be sufficient time for the cabin crew to secure the cabin for arrival. In this scenario, Nick shows us how to use the FIX page to set up a “reminder” on the Navigation display that would indicate when we are 20 minutes from our destination. The green circle on the ND will serve as a reminder that we should turn on the passenger signs for the cabin crew to have ample time to prepare for our arrival. If you think this is a good “trick”, there is still much more to learn about the programming of the PMDG777.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="width:600px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub21.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub21.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub22.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub22.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub23.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub23.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub24.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub24.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub25.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub25.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub26.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub26.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub27.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub27.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub28.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub28.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub29.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub29.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub30.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub30.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>As we near the end of our nearly 3 hour video, Nick walks (talks) us through the arrival briefing and the proper setup of the FMC for our arrival. After landing in Amsterdam and arriving at our gate, we bring the aircraft back to the condition in which we found it.</p> <p> </p> <p>By following the Secure and Power Down procedures, we leave the aircraft in a somewhat cold and dark condition. At the end of this flight, we would have learned how to power up the aircraft, perform departure and arrival briefings, program the FMS and we would have also covered many “hidden” details of the B777 that contribute to a realistic flight experience.</p> <p> </p> <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="5"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub31.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub31.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"> </p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub32.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub32.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub33.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub33.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub34.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub34.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub35.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub35.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub36.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub36.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub37.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub37.jpg"></a></p> </td> <td style="width:200px;"> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/Dub38.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_Dub38.jpg"></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p> </p> <p>Given the fact that this is just the first of three videos, and certainly does a fine job at whetting your appetite for more! In the end you will certainly be humbled at the vast amount of information that you can easily take for granted. Prior to viewing the PMDG 777 training I thought that the 777 was a bit boring and lacked character (This is after flying the MJC Q400 for such a long time). However, after spending countless hours going through the Ground Work and Flight Work sections of this training program, I am on the verge of revising my opinion on the PMDG777. At this point in time, it is my personal view that anyone who finds the PMDG777 to be boring simply doesn’t know enough about this aircraft.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>CONCLUSION</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>The length of this review has gone much longer than I anticipated and this can be a good and a bad thing. The good thing about the length of this review is that it shows you that the AOA 777 Training is by no means a mediocre attempt at someone teaching you things you already know.</p> <p> </p> <p>This is a well-structured, highly in-depth training program that accelerates the process of learning how to correctly operate such a sophisticated aircraft. The videos were well presented and they show a clear focus on having a high quality learning experience through graphic demonstrations and practical examples where necessary.</p> <p> </p> <p>If you are new to the PMDG 777 or perhaps still on the fence about buying it, I would highly recommend the AOA Training program to either get a sneak peak of the PMDG 777’s capabilities or to enhance your knowledge on how to correctly fly this aircraft.</p> <p> </p> <p>The training package comes at a cost of $54.99 USD and I honestly think that for what you are getting, this is a VERY reasonable price. If for some reason you aren’t satisfied, there is also a 30 day money back guarantee to put your mind as ease. For those of you who would like to see a little more before purchasing, you can also opt for a Free Trial. After the trial period is over, you can then opt to view the training course in full.</p> <p> </p> <p>All things considered, I was very pleased with this package and I definitely believe that it is worth an AVSIM GOLD STAR for being one of the best training programs available. The quality is unsurpassed and the methods used for instructing are captivating.</p> <p> </p> <p>The PMDG777 shines brightly in this training program and I must admit that this aircraft is truly one of the greatest achievements in home based flight simulation. Why not give it a try?</p> <p> </p> <p style="text-align: center"><a href= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/CONCLUSION.jpg"><img alt="" src= "http://www.avsim.com/pages/0414/AOA/T_CONCLUSION.jpg"></a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Acknowledgments</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>A special thanks goes out to Martin from FlyTampa for contributing a copy of <a data-ipb='nomediaparse' data-ipb='nomediaparse' data-ipb='nomediaparse' data-ipb='nomediaparse' href='http://www.flytampa.org/omdb.html'><span style= "color:windowtext;">Dubai Rebooted</span></a> and “Kroswynd” for assisting with making these screenshots look absolutely stunning!</p></body></html>



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