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Guest david248

I am so understanding this. People please read. :)

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Guest david248

Okay I'm not bragging! I have been practicing on the Ready for pushback 747-200 and I am so good at the autolandings so that probably means I'll be able to ace the 747 queen right :)? Well and the 737-800 :). My life is going so well. Thanks PMDG. I'm about to make a flight out to La Gurdia NY. IN THE 737-800 AMERICAN AIRLINES :) wish me luck. Flight level of 22000FT Cruising at 280 KNOTS. Sounds good huh? Thanks.Pmdg rocks! David S

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Guest mruane

Believe me David, there is better stuff yet to come. Now you have the autoland under control, which means that you know how to configure the aircraft for landing - and that's good - the next step is to take control yourself at the decision height point and bring here down on your own. That will give you another buzz that will exceed the one your having now - so get ready for it!Your quite right - PMDG does indeed Rock!PS You are bragging! But that's OK - you earned it :-beerchug

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Guest Paul Heaney

"I have been practicing on the Ready for pushback 747-200 and I am so good at the autolandings so that probably means I'll be able to ace the 747 queen right"Feels good when you let that plan land itself, huh? :(Try an manual landing.

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No joy in autolanding... at least not any more. It's nice to set up an ILS and handle throttle and flying by yourself. With bad weather :-) TRY IT!

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Guest Buck Bolduc

>No joy in autolanding... at least not any more. It's nice to>set up an ILS and handle throttle and flying by yourself. With>bad weather :-) TRY IT!Yes, sure it's fun.In the real world pilots know an autoland under severe weather is the way to go, never put your pax in a stuation where the risk factor is higher. They know the computers can fly the AC better than they, espeacialy under those conditions.The 767 used a 286 class proc. The new ones, I would emagine use something even more powerfull, faster reacting.Interesting stuff.The space shuttle Columbia utilised an 8086 proc. On it's maiden flight and opon it's first landing, they allmost lost it.When flairing out to touchdown it allmost flipped over backwards. The flight computer called for a little up elevator, then promptly went to check on fuel status, then went back to flight controls and found to it's horrer the shuttles attitude was way out of whack for touchdown. A slight error in program logic I would say. Who cares about how much fuel onboard when your 2-3 seconds from touchdown. I that case, perhaps your right, I know you dont check for fuel during flair.Best

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Guest boxjockey99

GuysSpeaking from experience an autoland is a nice thing to have but really takes the fun out of flying if you have to use it. I have just had a week of looking out of the window as in our company new skippers have to take all the take-offs and landings so I have only flown the aircraft twice in a week. Imagine my horror last night when departing for Malaga in Spain that the aircraft needed 'standard landings' (autoland practice) in order to upgrade it to CAT3A. That means my landing in Malaga is out of the window and yet another bit of fun removed. We pilots like to show off and landing is the only place we can really show off en-mass. ie if we manage a nice smooth landing and everyone comments how good it was then we get a buzz! The challenge for us is to fly the thing manually all the way ie from loc intercept with flap 5 all the way to the ground or even better in raw data (without the flight directors) from clean (no flaps). Thats when you start to see if you can still 'do it'. As a former F27 driver I used to be quite good at raw data approaches but that flight director is so good it gets you into that nice easy life so quickly, to turn it off takes quite a lot of effort!Finally yes PMDG does indeed rock, I used it in my B737 conversion course it was so good.Happy trailsKris

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Guest jettjokk

Since I learned how to finish the ILS on autopilot by disconnecting it and hand flying the last 400-500 feet down before I figured how to make the autoland work what I saw was that the autoland landed the plane differently than I was. I was starting the flare at 300 feet which is way too soon and wastes a lot of runway. I saw autoland wait until 50 feet to flare/idle throttles and I saw how that made for a shorter landing roll and faster turn off the runway. So the autoland taught me how to properly hand fly the last part of a landing. Course now I have to handle the crosswind myself which can be interesting...DanS

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Guest boxjockey99

Autoland I think uses a rad alt of 50ft FLARE mode engages and at 27ft RA the A/THR retards the thrust levers but unfortunatley the AUtoland system is somewhat crude on the 737 and you tend to get a 'standard Boeing landing' ie a thumper! When hand flying I tend to wait till around 15ft to flare and pull the thrust off, this menas I am probably landing with a little power on as the engines spool down but it makes it much smoother. This is made easier when the aircraft has rad alt call outs to allow you to look out of the window rather than at the EADI Rad alt readout!For cross wind practice try landing at Leeds Bradford (EGNM) most days with realtime weather thats what we call crosswind! We often end up with 20-50kt straight across the runway. It is also the highest airfield in the UK and as a result we get a phenomenon known as 40kt fog! which is fairly self explanitary! Happy trailsKris

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