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I need help from someone, quick...

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Ok, i bet youre gonna say that I wasted my week away doing nothing while I should have been studying, but i need to know a few things:What is Carb heat, what does it do?What are magnetos?What is the difference between a power on and off stall?Hehe, thanks in advance for the replies, im gonna get lectured on homework tomorrow, lol. :)

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>>What is Carb heat, what does it do? >The carburator, which mixes fuel and air, is shaped like a pipe with the center squeezed in. This squeezing causes the speed with which the fuel/air mixture passes through to rise relative to the rest of the carb due to the venturi effect. This relative increase in speed causes a decrease in temperature, which, under the right set of outside air temp and humidity, could cause ice to form. Ice forming would block the fuel/air mixture from entering the engine, and would be a bad thing. Therefore, heat is transferred from the engine to the carb to insure that ice doesn't form. If that's the case, why not have carb heat on all the time? 2 reasons. 1- It decreases engine performance, as it has the same effect as a higher OAT increasing the density altitude of the air the engine receives, and 2- In many engines, heated carb air is unfiltered.>What are magnetos? >Magnetos are spinning magnets that provide an electrical impulse to the spark plugs to provide fire. While they are very old technology, they are not subject to failure if the electrical (e.g. battery/alternator) system goes TU, allowing the engine to continue to function in such a situation.>What is the difference between a power on and off stall? >"Power On" stalls are generally thought of as take-off configuration stalls. Full power, little or no flaps, and a high angle of climb relative to the horizon. On the other hand, "power off" stalls are landing configuration. Idle power, full flaps, relatively flat angle relative to the horizon. Remember, however, that regardless of power, configuration, speed, bank angle, or any other factor, the angle of attack (angle between the wing and relative wind) will remain constant at the stall break.>Hehe, thanks in advance for the replies, im gonna get >lectured on homework tomorrow, lol. :) Airplanes are more important than homework.KM

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