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LAdamson

Attn Flatlanders - Look at maps when flying in Colorado

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For the fifteenth time in a few years, another flatlander finds out there's a rather large obstacle when flying West along I-70 in Colorado.Flatlanders from Canada (they're usually from Texas), flying a really small plane - with no turbocharging - in the mountains - in Colorado - found out that they didn't have enough power to get over Loveland Pass when reaching the Eisenhower Tunnel. No Kidding Sherlock.They didn't realize the highway didn't go all the way from Denver to Grand Junction in a lovely valley low enough for a powerless plane to fly all the way through. This is a popular route for people who didn't look at maps to go - and they all end up in a pile at Loveland Pass for the same reason.Fortunately the couple wasn't badly hurt on the landing which was made on the Loveland Ski Area slope, but I think they learned a valuable lesson:Moral of the story: Look at your maps. When you see this symbol |---| on a highway, it means there's a tunnel, usually through a really high mountain. Also, when you're flying through mountainous terrain - ask what's there and if your toy is powerful enough to get through the things.http://avsim.com/flightdeck/temp/plane.jpgYou can scan the Colorado news sites for the story. I hope you all learn a valuable lesson as well. This couple was very, VERY lucky because the guy was good enough to know how to perform a safe crash.

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bump - just 'cause I hate being on page two with nothing on page one

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Yes------------- "Flatlanders" run into this problem all the time!! I don't have any specifics on this accident & can't tell from the pic if it's a 172 for sure, or not (because I can't see the tail close up). We have the same type of problems here in Utah! To many pilots getting into rising boxed canyon terrain until it's to late. As a simmer, some might believe that you can just kick rudder, do a wing over & head downhill................... but this is not true. By then you've already used every "ounce" of airspeed left by trying to outclimb the terrain. With just a hint of a turn, you hit stalling speed & become part of the mountain!!Of course there are many things you can do before this scenario to get out of the mess to start with. But then this requires some book learning or courses in mountain flight, as well as practice! And BTW---- reading the "map" for mountain passes is as important as any! :)But then, that's a reason I'm building the RV6A :) Basically the same engine as a 172 SP (180HP), but a whole lot lighter, more manuverable, & climbs about 3 times faster!! Density altitude won't be such a factor. L.Adamson

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