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Step climb

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Hi there.This is a quick one since I just took off for EKCH - KSEA. When I am flying this route I need to step climb - but not the ICAO way. This because I need to stepclimb in equal altitudes (ex. 280, 300, 320) due to flying westbound. Hmm what is it then that I have to write in FMC instead of ICAO??Really need the answer since I am now at FL220 and climbing.Blue SkiesMichael

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Guest Ian_Riddell

>When I am flying this route I need to step climb - but not >the ICAO way. This because I need to stepclimb in equal >altitudes (ex. 280, 300, 320) due to flying westbound. Hmm >what is it then that I have to write in FMC instead of >ICAO?? If your initial cruise altitude is 280, then you should enter "2000".Is your aircraft RVSM approved?Cheers.Ian.

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I dont know if its approved but its an 763 so I believe so - If I enter 2000 will that mean that it will Stepclimb 2000 ft. ex. 280 300 320 etc?Michael

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Guest Martin

Yes, entering 2000 means the climb will be in 2000 ft steps.About RVSM approvement, I don't think any FS aircraft (in terms of equipment, not considering the fact that they aren't actually aircraft ;-)) would be approved (not sure though). RVSM certification involves altimeter checks, independant altimeters, and a load of other things (TCAS is one I think). To cross the NAT (North Atlantic) in the OTS (Organised Track System, i.e. the NAT tracks) you also need MNPS (Minimum Navigation Performance Specification) certification, which is among other things at least two FMS systems I think (not sure exactly what it is).But then I've heard that SAS never (or at least rarely) uses the OTS (since they go further north), so perhaps you don't need to bother with MNPS after all. :-)Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

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Guest

well first of all you altitudes are wrong for real world.if you are flying westbound it is 31000/35000/39000 and eastbound 29000/33000/37000

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Guest Martin

Yes and no. Most of Europe, the North Atlantic, the Pacific, and some other areas have implemented RVSM (Reduced Vertical Separation Minima), which means the seperation is reduced from 2000' to 1000' vertically. So all even levels are westbound and all odd are eastbound, if you apply the east/west rule.BTW, in a decade or so most of the world will be RVSM airspace.Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

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Guest

roger on that and don't forget it is not only the airspace but the plane has to be approved for it as well. Most, if not all, modern airliners are.

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