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npbosch

How to finish PCB's

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In the electronics catalogs I have (Conrad/Reichelt) I see all kind of sprays for PCB's.Does anybody use these? Do I have to spray the PCB's to keep them in good condition for the coming years?Please some advise for an electronic newbie.RegardsNorbert

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There is type of spray that has actually some good use: it produces a thin layer (you can peel it off) of material to protect the copper layers.Copper is pretty delicate: it can oxidize or be corroded easly in plain air.So a thin layer of this spray is a good thing.

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>>In the electronics catalogs I have (Conrad/Reichelt) I see all>kind of sprays for PCB's.>>Does anybody use these? Do I have to spray the PCB's to keep>them in good condition for the coming years?>Please some advise for an electronic newbie.I use some of them.The most important ones I use are the Plastic spray (Plastik 70) and Loetlack (SK10, its both a flux and protective spray, it helps soldering, and it can be left on the PCB and acts as a protection layer eg against copper oxidation) from Kontakt Chemie/CRC Industries.I have a bunch more, but for PCBs these two are the ones I always use.The Plastik 70 spray is also good as a toner remover when you make your PCBs with the toner transfer method.Manuel

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Here in the States you can get this stuff called "Tin-It". It comes in liquid form and will deposit a .003" to .005" tin plating on the PCB. A similar product comes in powder form, but once you mix it the "shelf life clock" starts ticking. Real the best would be solder mask, but tough to do for the do-it-yourselfer.Gus B

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Hi ManuelTxs for your answer. I see them both in my Reichelt catalog. Perhaps a stupid question, but should I apply it before or after soldering? If I read that it is a "l

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The plastic 70, if it is what i have in mind, would prevent you from soldering: applying a thin layer of plastic material, the allowy won't attach to the copper layer, because there is the plastic between.So it is applyed after soldering.

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>Hi Manuel>>Txs for your answer. I see them both in my Reichelt catalog. >Perhaps a stupid question, but should I apply it before or>after soldering? >>If I read that it is a "l

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Can you elaborate a bit on how you obtain the component mask?I'm really interested!

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>Can you elaborate a bit on how you obtain the component>mask?>I'm really interested!Quite easy:I print a mirrored version of the component legend onto magazine paper with a laser printer, then heat up the iron (the one thats used for clothes), put the paper toner side down on the non-copper side of the PCB, align with the copper side, then run over the paper with the iron (on second hightest temperature) with moderate pressure.Then I put the board with the paper sticking to it into lukewarm water, let the paper soak with water and peel the paper off.The remaining paper pieces I rub off with thumb-action. It might not come off totally with most paper types, but using the plastic spray, it "conserves" the wet look inside the plastic layer. (of course I let the board fully dry until I apply the plastic spray.)Thats it :)Basically the "Toner Transfer Method" applied also on the other side.Manuel

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I hoped there was some possibility even for me non laser user :)

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With the toner transfer method, I use a well produced inkjet copy on white paper, then go to my local printer and have it photocopied onto a transparancy. The photocopier must not place the usual layer of oil over the finished copy (all new copiers do this to make the image look crisper.

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>I hoped there was some possibility even for me non laser user>:)Just go to a copyshop and copy your inkjet printed version.The only problem is the choice of paper. Not sure if the copy-show owners will like it when you come with your own paper, esp if its some kind of magazine paper that already has something on it. They may look at you like you are weird :)

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If you have an ink-jet printer, why not just print the pcb layout onto a transparency? After that, all you need is pre-sensitized blank boards and a flourescent light. Expose the board with the transparency on top, develop the board, etch the board. Milt

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> If you have an ink-jet printer, why not just print the>pcb layout onto a transparency? After that, all you need is>pre-sensitized blank boards and a flourescent light. Expose>the board with the transparency on top, develop the board,>etch the board. Maybe you should go back up and read Claudio's question :)He asked about the component legend.And etching the top side of a single-sided board won't do any good. ;)Manuel

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Please excuse me. I seem to have made a fatal mistake. I will try harder next time to be more alert to the conversation befor I attempt to respond. Milt

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