Sign in to follow this  
Guest WorkingStiff

arrival time on the MCDU ...

Recommended Posts

hi guys,i used to play with the Phoenix 777 a/c panel when it first came out for FS2000, and i think it is one fine panel for Fs2000,however now i play with FS2002just a small q with regard to ETA (estimated time at arrival) at an airport, when i look at it say if i am flying from KLAX to KSFO it would tell me 19:25Z when i am say crusingnow the thing is that this arrival time is not accurate because obviously the plane has to slow down and descend till it arrives at KSFOand i have found out that when i do arrive at KSFO i arrive at 19:43Zthe above is just an examplenow my concern is, how does a pilot know what time *really* the plane will arrive at the airport,it would be quite embarrassing if i was a pilot and told my virtual passenger (by looking at my MCDU) that arrival at KSFO is 19:25Z when infact - compensating for descent etc - arrival time should be 19:43Zany real workl pilots out there, is the MCDU accurate ie does it take into account descents, STARS etc and then give u a better approx of arrival time?is there a panel out there than can give u a accurate ETA at the airport i dont mean VOR or Intersections i mean airports arriving atp.s this is not only in PSS panel in all the panels or the flight planner with Fs2002 as wellthx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

The planned arrival time is mentioned in the company timetables :-)The actual planned time is constantly adjusted by the computer based on distance remaining and current speed over ground.I find it to be quite accurate actually, especially on long flights. Did a flight from St.Maarten to Schiphol yesterday and it was only a few minutes off.Actual arrival time I've not heard mention during flights, pilots typically give only the current time at destination half an hour or so before landing so passengers can adjust their watches.A pilot can of course never know the actual arrival time until he has pulled up to the gate.Maybe he gets a different STAR to fly which adds time, or he can be put in a hold somewhere for half an hour. I've spent time in aircraft sitting on a taxiway waiting until a gate became available (As a passenger, that is).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are talking about real life, the FMC will automatically calculate the time out accurately if the path is follwed as planned. STARS have speed restriction, there would be a calculated aproach speed etc. The FMC is able to calculate accurate times of arrival if everything went as planned. If you have ATC restrictions to slow down while descending etc, this would change the ETA time given to you during cruise.Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about when the pilot says "cabin crew, ten minutes to land" (I'm sure I've heard five and perhaps two minutes also). Is that just a rough estimate?Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the pilot relies solely on the FMC of MDCU for arrival estimates. The pilot is in constant contact with the dispatcher via radio and/or ACARS and its the dispatcher's responsibility to update the pilot on the ETA particularly if there are en route delays due to weather, traffic congestion, etc.Most airlines operate the hub and spoke system so they need to make sure that flights arrive within certain periods so passengers can make their connections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I know, ETA on PTVS or announced to the cabin comes from the FMC. Yes, you are right that there are traffic to consider so it is very rare that you arrive exactly on the time you were told to expect to arrive during cruise. The FMC estimates the descent quite accurately, and based on entered speed and altitude restrictions across the descent profile via a STAR to the expected landing runway, will generate a very accurate time for landing.The ETA is also constantly updated. So if a new arrival routing or runway is given by ATC once that information has been entered into the FMC the ETA will be immediately updated."5 minutes to touchdown".... messages like this are to update the cabin crew, so they can organise their time more efficiently...etc. I believe this is obtained from the FMC also. Pretty impossible dispatch could estimate your time of arrival as you won't know what is it to be like when it comes to your descent path into the airport, weather, wind.. etc.My 2cents, feel free to correct me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<<"5 minutes to touchdown".... messages like this are to update the cabin crew, so they can organise their time more efficiently...etc. I believe this is obtained from the FMC also. Pretty impossible dispatch could estimate your time of arrival as you won't know what is it to be like when it comes to your descent path into the airport, weather, wind.. etc.>>As a matter of fact, they do know. Since dispatchers are responsible for diversions etc., they have to stay on top of the weather, traffic conditions, etc. These are some of the dispatcher's responsibilities:Job Description of the AIRCRAFT DISPATCHERThe Aircraft Dispatcher is a licensed airman certificated by the Federal Aviation Administration. He/She has joint responsibility with the captain for the safety and operational control of flights under his/her guidance. He/She authorizes, regulates and controls commercial airline flights according to government and company regulations to expedite and ensure safety of flight. He/She is also responsible for economics, passenger service and operational control of day to day flight operations. He/She analyzes and evaluates meteorological information to determine potential hazards to safety of flight and to select the most desirable and economic route of flight. He/She computes the amount of fuel required for the safe completion of flight according to type of aircraft, distance of flight, maintenance limitations, weather conditions and minimum fuel requirements prescribed by federal aviation regulations. He/She prepares flight plans containing information such as maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights, weather reports, field conditions, NOTAMS and many other informational components required for the safe completion of flight. He/She prepares and signs the dispatch release which is the legal document providing authorization for a flight to depart. He/She delays or cancels flights if unsafe conditions threaten the safety of his/her aircraft or passengers. He/She monitors weather conditions, aircraft position reports, and aeronautical navigation charts to evaluate the progress of flight. He/She updates the pilot in command of significant changes to weather or flight plan and recommends flight plan alternates, such as changing course, altitude and, if required, enroute landings in the interest of safety and economy.He/She originates and disseminates flight information to others in his/her company including stations and reservations. This is the source of information provided to the traveling public. He/She has undergone extensive training to have earned the coveted Aircraft Dispatcher's certificate having taken and passed both an extensive oral examination and the comprehensive Dispatch ADX test, administered by the Federal Aviation Administration. These tests are equivalent to the same Air Transport Pilot (ATP) written and oral examinations that an airline captain must successfully complete. He/She participates in frequent and detailed recurrent training courses covering aircraft systems, company operations policy, meteorology and Federal Air Regulations as required by the FAA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this