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Challenge to classic airliner designers (PSS and FLight

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I thought I posted this here but can't find it. Forgive me if you've seen this and replied. I know back in the early days of airliners, airways were navigated via a system of beeps that would be continuous when on course. It would be really cool to have a VOR-type gauge that could replicate the beeps rather than drive an OBS. Guess we would have to use the current VOR system, although I am sure it is more extensive than what was in use then. Anyone have any opinions or insight into this system (not sure when it was phased out)?David

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Problem is, David, it was never VORs that worked this way, it was the old NDB-style "radio ranges".Here's a good explanation of what they were (note what I highlighted in bold):"Radio Range. This system is also called a "four-course radio range" or "A-N range" and was first installed by the federal government in the late 1920s. By 1933, 90 of these radio ranges were operational. They were the standard navigation aid system until the 1950s. By the early 1950s nearly 400 ranges were operational; by 1957 about 88 were still operating, primarily for military use.The radio range is typically located 2 or 3 miles (sometimes farther) from the airfield; down wind for the prevailing bad weather wind direction (Day, 1938).Transmitting to an Amplitude Modulation (AM) receiver in the airplane, the radio range provided pilots with four on-course legs, or "beams," to fly. Flying any of the four on-course legs would give the pilot a continuous tone, formed by overlapping A (dash dot) N (dot dash) signals. The pilot would know if he was flying toward or away from the station by the increasing or decreasing volume of the transmission. The northern-most and southern-most quadrants would give the pilot only an N Morse code signal; the eastern-most and western-most quadrants would give only an A Morse code signal."I think after reading this, it should be obvious this is something not practical for simulation, never mind the fact that even the earliest jet airliners were not using it, along with most GA aircraft of the 1950s.Besides, it would drive most, if not all FS users crazy having to listen to this, for as you can see, it is a audible means of navigation, not a visual one on a panel gauge, and using current VORs to try to simulate the ranges would be highly unrealistic. ;-)I think we'll pass on this challenge, as any "classic" jet airliners we might ever do, would not have used this method of navigation.This is best left to those doing a Ford Tri-Motor or similar (DC-3, etc.), and flying around back in the 1920's and 30's, not for a DC-7, Connie, 707, DC-8 or even a Comet.Regards,http://www.dreamfleet2000.com/gfx/images/F...RUM_LOUF_A2.jpg

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Lou,Thanks for the response and the info! Obviously you must have given this some thought at some point ;-) I had no idea its useful life was so short. I agree it would be annoying but still wish I could experience an approach of this type at some point. Probably not commercially viable but maybe one of the freeware wizards will take heart. Thanks again and looking forward to the 310.David

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