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FS2K2 climb rates realistic??

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I currently have what appear, on the face of it, to be excessive climb rates in FS2K2. I would be glad if anyone could either tell me that I don't really have a problem or alternatively give me a clue what any problem might be.The whole thing started with VNAV mode on the PSS 777-200. When I flew the tutorial flight, following John Helsby's excellent instructions, pressing VNAV immediately resulted in a climb rate varying between 8000 and 11000 fpm until cruise altitude. This meant reaching FL200 in about 3 minutes flat. Using v/s mode and setting a more reasonable fpm rate worked perfectly and the descent using VNAV also worked fine. Whwn I used autopilot on the PSS Airbus, I didn't have the same problem.I thought it must be that I had missed something out on the instructions, but I then tried to simulate the same performance with pure manual flight. With max thrust takeoff and manual pitch control I managed to get to about FL200 in the default 737, the Lear and the default 747 as well as the PSS777-200 within about 3-4 minutes as well.Not being a pilot myself, I don't know whether the climb rates I am getting are realistic or not. I tried deleting the FS2K2.cfg file and letting FS2K2 rebuild it but that made no difference. I know I could do a clean install of FS2K2, but since I live in the middle of nowhere and am reliant on dial up, I don't really want to have to reinstall God knows how many MB of the PSS Airbus at non broadband rate.Any comments gratefully received - I can obviously e-mail copies of .cfg files for FS2K2 or the aircraft if this helps, but I don't really know where to go from here.TIARob

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The default FS2002 jets are way overpowered, so I wouldn't be concerned about those. As for the PSS, how much fuel do you have loaded? If you loaded light for the probably short flight that the tute had you doing, then this would explain the impressive climb performance since VNAV basically applies full climb power, attains the VNAV speed, then pitches up as far as will allow the VNAV speed to be maintained. Less fuel = less weight = better performance = more power to put into the climb over maintaining VNAV speed.A fuller belly of fuel or the use of a derated climb power should tame the beast into more realistic climb rates.Gary

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Thanks - will experiment. At least I have some comfort that I don't need to reinstall etc!!Rob

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Yep, if you set fuel very low and fly with an almost empty cabin (I think the PSS 777 is set to 0 pax and cargo when you first install it) you will climb like a rocket.Consider that the power of those engines must be enough to lift that same aircraft when it's fully loaded (which may more than double the weight).

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>I currently have what appear, on the face of it, to be >excessive climb rates in FS2K2. I would be glad if anyone >could either tell me that I don't really have a problem or >alternatively give me a clue what any problem might be. >>The whole thing started with VNAV mode on the PSS 777-200. >When I flew the tutorial flight, following John Helsby's >excellent instructions, pressing VNAV immediately resulted >in a climb rate varying between 8000 and 11000 fpm until >cruise altitude. This meant reaching FL200 in about 3 >minutes flat. Using v/s mode and setting a more reasonable >fpm rate worked perfectly and the descent using VNAV also >worked fine. Whwn I used autopilot on the PSS Airbus, I >didn't have the same problem. >>I thought it must be that I had missed something out on the >instructions, but I then tried to simulate the same >performance with pure manual flight. With max thrust takeoff >and manual pitch control I managed to get to about FL200 in >the default 737, the Lear and the default 747 as well as the >PSS777-200 within about 3-4 minutes as well. >>Not being a pilot myself, I don't know whether the climb >rates I am getting are realistic or not. I tried deleting >the FS2K2.cfg file and letting FS2K2 rebuild it but that >made no difference. I know I could do a clean install of >FS2K2, but since I live in the middle of nowhere and am >reliant on dial up, I don't really want to have to reinstall >God knows how many MB of the PSS Airbus at non broadband >rate. >>Any comments gratefully received - I can obviously e-mail >copies of .cfg files for FS2K2 or the aircraft if this >helps, but I don't really know where to go from here. >>TIA >>Rob Hello Bob,It's all on the internet if you search with Google etc.Aircraft Information.Then if you think it needs fixing you edit the .air file using 3rd party freeware tools:Have a look at:http://perso.wanadoo.fr/hsors/FS_Soft/fsairfile.htmlIan.TYPE ENGINE ABBREVIATIONS P piston T jet/turboprop J jet CLIMB AND DESCENT RATES Climb and descent rates based on average en route climb/descent profiles at median weight between maximum gross takeoff and landing weights. SRS SRS means "same runway separation;" categorization criteria is specified in para 3-9-6, Same Runway Separation. MANUFACTURERS Listed under the primary manufacturer are other aircraft manufacturers who also make versions of some of the aircraft in that group. AIRCRAFT WEIGHT CLASSES a. Heavy. Aircraft capable of takeoff weights of more than 255,000 pounds whether or not they are operating at this weight during a particular phase of flight. b. Large. Aircraft of more than 41,000 pounds, maximum certificated takeoff weight, up to 255,000 pounds. c. Small. Aircraft of 41,000 pounds or less maximum certificated takeoff weight. STAGE 3 AIRCRAFT DESIGNATORS Stage 3 aircraft designators such as B72Q, B73Q, DC8Q, DC9Q are only for use within the U.S. These designators will not be recognized in Canadian airspace or any other airspace outside the U.S. NOTE-* Denotes single-piloted military turbojet aircraft or aircraft to receive the same procedural handling as a single-piloted military turbojet aircraft.*** Denotes amphibian aircraft.+ Denotes aircraft weighing between 12,500 lbs. and 41,000 lbs. For Class B Airspace rules, these aircraft are "large, turbine-engined powered aircraft." Fixed-Wing Aircraft 777-200 B772 2J/H 2,500 --------RoC in fpm 2,500 III 777-300 B773 2J/H 2,500 2,500 III

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Thanks - I had used load edit to set passenger and cargo levels, but fairly low fuel (about 20-30% in L & R tanks only).I guess my main query was with the VNAV aspect, in that I "assumed" that the autopilot would give a sensible/comfortable climb rate.I will now experiment with various settings and see where I get to.Rob

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Thanks Ian. I can see that I will have to spend some time and do some proper research if I want to bottom this for myself!!Rob

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VNav will give a sensible climbrate, meaning the most economical climbrate to altitude that is possible given aircraft weight and engine power (not to mention stress limits of course).If that happens to be straight up, it climbs straight up

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I am only a private pilot in real life, but I enjoy flying short haul for the virtual airline WestWind in FS and I try to make my flights as realistic as I can. With this in mind I paid close attention to a commercial flight I recently took to Prague from the UK, with a view to getting the climbout angle right. (The flight time was around 1 hour 45 minutes, cruise altitude was 23,500 or thereabouts, they announced it in metres being as it was CSA I was flying with - which I can recommend highly BTW, and the aircraft was a B737-500)When we took off I thought the climb out angle was pretty steep for an aircraft with probably half full tanks and almost all the seats full although he may have been told to do this as there was plently of low cloud about. Attempting to duplicate the angle as I observed it from the window (this was from from EGCC Manchester's 24 left, where as far as I am aware there are no mandatory noise abatement throttle restrictions)I would say between 3000 and 2500 feet per minute was about right in FS2002, although the return flight (737-400 from LKPR Prague Ruzyne) was a much shallower climb angle, and an appalling landing back at Manchester incidentally, which was way too high and fast - probably some Czech ex MiG 29 pilot yearning for the good old days LOL! Anyway it proves there's hope for us all!)Hope this helps in your quest for realism. (not the bad landing bit though obviously!)PS. I can also recommend FS HotSeat if you are striving for realism it ties in well with FS's ATC, and you can leave the co-pilot to do the climb checklist while you're battling with the VNAV, which in a FBW Airbus is probably very true to life LOL!

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