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Guest AndrewW

Approach procedures for Concorde?

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I just downloaded the new FS France Concorde and started playing around with it last night. This is a great plane and surprisingly easy to fly, but I am having a problem getting set up for my approaches; in particular, I've found it impossible to get slowed down to landing speed. I was actually surprised at how easy it was to descend quickly while still reducing speed from M2 down to 180-200 KIAS or so, but once I get established on the localizer and descend on the glideslope, I start speeding up again, even at idle throttle, and am at 230+ by the time I get to the runway. In most planes you would be using flaps at this stage, but that's not an option here, and I find deploying the spoilers at this point seems to pitch the nose down uncontrollably.I believe the Concorde has inboard reversers which may or may not be in use during the glideslope descent, but I don't know the commands for them. Anyone have any ideas/tips how to get this thing from the IAF to the runway safely?Thanks.Marc

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Marc Sykes,I'm new to the site. Sorry, I don't have an answer on the Concorde, but I was hoping you could give me some advice on how to install new airplanes in Flight Simulator 98. I used the unzip/installer program I downloaded from AVSIM, and it seems like everything is in the right directories, but the aircraft don't show up in the list in FS98. Do you know of anything I might be doing wrong?Mark WaltonRocky Point, NC

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Hello Marc, I can't comment on the operations at Air France, I believe they have slightly different procedures. However at British Airways, each route will have a restriction on where you have to fly slower than M1 (usually at least 30nm before hitting land). You then lookup on the normal checklist the distance required to decelerate, dependent on the temperature, winds and of course - altitude. At this point, the throttles are brought back to 18 degrees, and the current aircraft's altitude is held until you hit 350Kias. The AFCS is then instructed to hold 350Kias, and so the aircraft has no choice than to descend. Some other throttle procedures follow after this, and the aircraft will pass through M1 between FL410 and FL370. Different types of descent, which enforce different procedures, are used on a number of routes - but generally you will slow to M0.95 and hold this. Descent from subsonic cruise: Still in Mach hold, close the throttles and the aircraft will descend, holding M0.95. On reaching 350Kias, the AFCS is instructed to now hold 350kias. It is at this point in the descent - and only this point that the idle reverse system can be used. Usually only on the inboards and you have to be below 370Kias and 30k. Some other restrictions apply - but you're not going to need to use it for long - the descent rate can be up to 11,000fpm! Usually you plan the descent without the use of idle reverse, and it may only be used a handful of times in a pilots career. The standard approach in Concorde is the Reduced Noise Approach, which is usually hand flown when the runway has an ILS and can be seen by 500R. Once on the glideslope, the approach is flown at VREF+30kts down to 800R (min 190kts) and then reduced to VREF+7. The aircraft must be stabilized at this speed by 500R - if not, a go around must be carried out. Due to being so far back on the drag curve at these low speeds, the aircraft requires less thrust to fly 190Kts than it will to fly at 160Kts - and also less thrust whilst decelerating between 800R and 500R, and so the aircraft will not produce as much noise on the approach as it would if a constant speed was flown down the ILS. I'm not sure how easy it is to simulate this with the PM2 airfile - I personally didn't like it. I would recommend Paul Varn's at flightsim.com. Hope this helps a little. Andrew

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