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concorde

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Hi,I've got a serious problem with my concorde. When I reach my cruisealtitude (60000ft). The nose of the plane is still 5 6 or 7 degreesabove the horizon. OK I know it has something to do with the fuel andwhere it's stored but I tried to get all of the fuel into the back of the plane but it still doesn't help.Maybe some of you could help me... would be greatful

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Think about what the result of this would do to the center of gravity(CG) I tried to get all of the fuel into the back of the plane It would seem that the fuel in the aft of the plane should be burnt during Climb,leaving more fuel in the fore of the plane,thus resulting in a more forward CG=lover pitch angle ;)RegardsJohn Mc Avinuehttp://www.bavirtual.co.ukP 2.53 GHZ512 RAMWINXPGFORCE 4 128MB Ti4600http://vatsim.pilotmedia.fi/statusindicato...tor=OD1&a=a.jpg

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Probably has less to do with the fuel load, and more to do with the thinner air at FL600, which in turn requires the nose up attitude to maintain level flight. Putting the fuel in the back is the last thing you would want to do, as it would cause the nose to pitch up further, and create a dangerous balance problem. Imagine being in a canoe with 2 others, but all 3 of you sitting on one another's laps at the back of the canoe. My bet is that all 3 of you would get wet ;)

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I have some updated flight dynamics that Andrew Wilson was kind enough to send me. They make her fly like you'd imagine. Check you're e-mail.Boone

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Is this a situation where one tries to climb straight up to FL600? The aircraft does not and cannot do this. Concorde flies in two cruise modes while supersonic - MAX CLIMB and MAX CRUISE. Both AFCS modes are similar to the FLCH system found on a Boeing airliner. In this case, the crew will instruct the system to hold VMO with the throttles at the forwards stops (not necessarily "full power") accompanied by reheats up to Mach 1.7. With this thrust, the aircraft has no choice but to climb in order to hold the speed. As the aircraft climbs and accelerates through the drag curve, the climb rate will vary - though the general pattern is for it to decrease so that on reaching FL500 - where the engine rating is switched to cruise - the climb rate is only a few hundred feet per/min, if that!The aircraft will then climb or descend depending on what the systems need to do in order to hold M2. On a NY flight - the aircraft hardly ever reaches FL600, the only route I know of that it will reach FL600 is on the way down to Barbados - and this is due to the very cold upper air temperatures. This altitude is only ever held for 15-20mins at the most. The fuel set-up is a little more complicated, as it can influence the time that the aircraft can remain supersonic depending on how much fuel is loaded and where. The ZFCG is important because it affects how the fuel is loaded into the fuel tanks. A further forward ZFCG means that more fuel (higher fuel loads will move the CoG rearwards) can be loaded, keeping within the limits of the T/O CG. However, this will then require a greater amount of fuel to be transferred aft to obtain a 59% CG during the supersonic cruise. The more fuel you have to pump aft, the less fuel you can feed into the collector tanks in order to feed the engines. A point in flight will arrive when this fuel is required to be fed into the wing tanks, and this would leave the crew no choice but to descend and decelerate. If this point is reached before your TOD (Decel), you

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