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Cactus521

FS2004 Pitch Sensitivity

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When I first flew FS2002, I had quite a problem with pitch sensitivity with the default aircraft, i.e. way too sensitive. And adjusting the sliders seemed to make very little difference. Of course, subsequent add-on aircraft from Dreamfleet, the Dassault Falcon and others alleviated this problem.I'm wondering if any of the beta testers have noticed an improvement in FS2004 regarding this issue. Thanks.Bob

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Bob,All add-on or aircraft I "tweaked" behaved exactly the same between FS2002 and FS2004. IOTW, FDE changes I or others have done to tone down pitch sensitivity applied themselves well in FS2004. Of the included FS2004 aircraft, the Mooney seems most sensitive to pitch. I made a few tweaks to the FDE to make it more controllable--and so much has to do with the config/calibration of the gaming controllers used.For the most part, many of the classic aircraft handled with less sensitivity to pitch. I've found the Jenny and Trimotor my favorites of the bunch. The Trimotor reminds me of one which used to be displayed at the Harrah's auto collection in Reno. They had one you could walk up and peer into.... What an awesome aircraft, and it's one well done in FS2004.-John

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Havn't checked the others, but I noticed that the default 172 has the trim set at T/O as default. This should take care of the "yanking" off the runway problem experienced in FS2002, if not setting the trim before takeoff.L.Adamson

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Can someone explain what sort of tweaking can be done to lessen the sensitivities to make control feel more realistic. I am especially having an issue with rudder sensitivity. I have used both the CH pedals and the Saitek x45 rudder system and find it hard to control well. Any thoughts?

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There's a few ways you can adjust the sensitivity for realism. One is a global setting, by adding this line:stick_sensitivity_mode=0to the [control] section of FS2002.cfgThe second way is using the tweaking features of FSUIPC.The third is on an aircraft by aircraft basis via the aircraft.cfg, which is my preference. By increasing or decreasing the effectiveness and stability parameters in the [flight_tuning] section, along with adjusting the MOI values, one can get an aircraft to both "Settle down" and also, one can eliminate that "flying on rails" feeling.I tend to coordinate my MOI values and stability and effectiveness values. It's not a black art once you get used to it--I can usually adjust a "jumpy" aircraft in a minute or two. My simple definition of MOI--the higher the value on a MOI axis, the more stick force required on that axis to start and stop movement. But once the aircraft is moving on the axis, that's where the effectiveness parameters come into play--higher values equal faster roll rates or movements in pitch. And tweaking the stability parameters adds the last touch--higher values tend to make it easier for the aircraft to maintain pitch (as an example) when pressure on the stick is relaxed.My suggestion--try the first two items before you start tweaking aircraft. If you want to tweak an aircraft, backup the aircraft.cfg and tweak the worst. Many 3rd party aircraft are missing the [flight_tuning] section altogether. You can add it in by pasting the section from the default Cessna. Then set all the values in the section to 1.0, and make adjustments from there.Mine is the simple explanation of how I adjust for sensitivity. Ask one of the aircraft gurus, and you'll learn more than you can imagine. And like any art, some compromise is made between realism and personal preference. Some real life aircraft are jumpy, and by tweaking the config to taste, it may make the aircraft more flyable, but it may be moving away from the way the real thing flies.-John

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