Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Airspace question?-Seattle,ex..

Recommended Posts

Hello, I am trying to fully grasp the airspaces in Fs9. I'm going to use Seattle International for example, the default. Their are concentric circles around this airport. Let's say that I was flying in. 1-Do I have to receive permission to fly through each airspace or does the permission for the first ring put you in control through the rest? 2-How do you figure out and find which frequency to use in order gain permission? This leads to another question. I know that ATC controls you inside of here via radar and this leads to a safer collision factor. What keeps planes from colliding all the time outside of controlled airspace? I know of the east-west altitude rules, but their are instances I'm sure when elevations are shared?Thanks,Todd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

1) All aircraft must be in contact with ATC before entering the designated area around Class B airspace. If you can see the Seattle Sectional clearly enough those concentric rings have numbers printed within each that look like a fraction (ceiling/base ie. 100/60 where 100 = 10,000' and 60 = 6,000'). Aircraft entering Seattle airspace from the south at Swanson airport above 6,000' and below 10,000' would be required to contact ATC before entering the airspace. If you are flying into Pierce County which is below Seattle Class B airspace and you stay below 5,000' (see 100/50 on the chart in that section of airspace) you would not need to contact ATC. Just north of Pierce County the airspace minimum altitude drops to 3,000'.The Class B airspace looks like an upside down wedding cake with pieces cut out in layers. This is to allow the approach and departure climb and descent angles that the heavies need in order to fly safely into and out of to the north and south. You will notice that the east and west have 20 to 30 mile sections that are clear of Class B while north and south are extended.You can actually fly into Boeing Field from the NW below 1,800' and not have to contact ATC first. You will however have to contact Boeing (Class D airspace) Tower 5 miles out and receive a responce for clearance to approach to land.2) All pilots must carry with them the information needed to fly their designated route and any alternative they might take. This means knowing everything about the flight including radio frequencies. The AFD (airport facility directory) has this information for approach/departure frequencies for Seattle. There is also a TAC (Terminal Area Chart) that has an expanded view of the area within Class B airspace so you will have more visual references for maintaining your course. 126.5 would be the approach frequency if arriving from the south 161 to 198 degrees.2a) ATC keeps IFR aircraft clear of any VFR aircraft as well as other IFR aircraft. VFR aircraft maintain visual separation from each other outside of ATC controlled airspace. Just like driving your car, you don't want to run into anybody. Each pilot in command is responsible for maintaining a safe distance from any other aircraft, terrain, structures or people per the FAR's.I'm not sure I understand your reference to shared elevations. From 000 to 179 degrees the required altitude is Odd thousands plus 500'. All VFR aircraft traveling east from Seattle (outside of Class B airspace) could share the same altitude. Let's say I am traveling from Seattle to Spokane at 7,500' and you are departing from Boeing field and traveling to Yakima at 7,500'. Somewhere just east of the departure area I see you to my left and see that we are converging. I have the right of way (remember this rule) because I am on your right. You would turn in and pass behind me at 500' or more lateral separation. You might slow or choose to turn to your right a few degrees and then return to your course after passing behind me. I hope this answers your questions :)Fly safe !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this