Sign in to follow this  
Guest

FS2002 Electrical System Map

Recommended Posts

I have created the following map of the FS2002 electrical system (if you can call it that). I'm certain it is incomplete, but it is the best that I have been able to come up with from observations and from the parameters.

Electrical System   [battery]	|	|<------- ELECTRICAL HOT BATTERY BUS VOLTAGE measured here	|	|<------- ELECTRICAL HOT BATTERY BUS AMPS measured here	|	^ELECTRICAL MASTER BATTERY (switch)	|	|	|<------- ELECTRICAL BATTERY BUS VOLTAGE measured here	|	|<------- ELECTRICAL BATTERY BUS AMPS measured here	|<------- ELECTRICAL BATTERY VOLTAGE (here?)	|<---/||||||						  [alternator]|							   ||							   ||							   |<---- ELECTRICAL GENALT1 BUS VOLTAGE|							   ||							   |<---- ELECTRICAL GENALT1 BUS AMPS|							   ||							   |<-------------------------------||||||||<------- ELECTRICAL MAIN BUS VOLTAGE measured here???<---- ELECTRICAL TOTAL LOAD AMPS measured from here|---> AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH		|		 CIRCUIT GENERAL PANEL ON		|	  nav radios, comm radios, electronic flight displays, engine displays, etc.		|	 AUTOPILOT MASTER		|	  [autopilot CONTROL BOX]|---> CIRCUIT FLAP MOTOR ON				|		electrically operated flaps				|---> CIRCUIT GEAR MOTOR ON|---> CIRCUIT AUTOPILOT ON				|		 autopilot drive mechanism								|---> CIRCUIT AVIONICS ON|---> CIRCUIT PITOT HEAT ON|---> CIRCUIT PROP SYNC ON|---> CIRCUIT AUTO FEATHER ON|---> CIRCUIT AUTO BRAKES ON|---> CIRCUIT STANDY VACUUM ON|---> CIRCUIT MARKER BEACON ON				|		   LIGHT BEACON ???|---> CIRCUIT GEAR WARNING ON|---> CIRCUIT HYDRAULIC PUMP ON		PITOT HEAT(should only work if elec is supplied?)

After that, it seems to go around in circles?Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

I did a similar (yet far from thais complete) "map" when starting out the electricals for the 421B. You mention that Pitot heat only works if elec is supplied, what does this mean? I basically couldn't get pitot power to be recognized as standard, so I ended up feeding my own variable with the current, which is only used by the voltammeter btw :)I also found that no matter where I put the probes, I could not get any valid reading from certain systems at all. This includes taxi and landing light power, but strangely enough not circuits that are mostly neglected by designers (I believe logo, courtesy, and recog lights).A side note regarding the default electrical system. I found that if I reduced the values of "additional_system" (used for driving all equipment that is hotwired to the battery bus, below the battery switch, whenever battery switch is ON), to something like this:additional_system=0, 0.1, 17.0the FSUIPC extended battery life fix was no longer needed. Yikes, what a sentence! Coupled with a low warning annunciator light that annouces a couple of volts before engine starts become impossible, I have no longer run into trouble - _without_ the fsuipc fix. This was a simulator compromise naturally, the real voltage warning (overload)makes no sense in fs world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a note to investigate the pitot heat. Since pitot heat can be supplied by an electrical element I wanted to know if it only functions when power is present.Any help with the map is appreciated. I would like to have a more realistic electrical system. I would like the ammeter to show a load when flaps actuate, beacon, strobe and nav lights are on, etc. Some a/c do this, but others do not.Looking at the electrical section in aircraft.cfg most a/c seem to have nearly the same settings (exactly on most) despite wildly differing a/c.BTW what is the difference between navigation and recognition lights?Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>BTW what is the difference between navigation and >recognition lights? nav lightst are the red/green wing lights, usually mounted so they are seen only from the front and sidesrecognition lights are steady white lights that're mounted on the wing tips, and angled to be seen from the read and sides only.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I just couldn't figure out what those were. Thought it might be a light on the N number! Is that "from the sides only?"I was wondering if there were special mounting or visibility criteria, because the nav lights always seem to be mounted on an angle at the front of the wing. Which means they are not visible from all angles. I see there is a purpose in that design.BTW you must really be swamped with customer support!To Karl,I think it is worthwhile to at least map out the system we have. Whether it is buggy or not. At least we may know what is correctly modeled and what is buggy. All without relying on the developer (you know who) to supply us with complete or correct information.Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I also found that no matter where I put the probes, I could >not get any valid reading from certain systems at all. This >includes taxi and landing light power, but strangely enough >not circuits that are mostly neglected by designers (I >believe logo, courtesy, and recog lights). The DF Archer II and Cardinal had to have special gauges programmed to get the ammeter to read correctly, etc. Typically the landing lights, starter motor, etc. are not run through the ammeter. So, they don't indicate. >A side note regarding the default electrical system. I found >that if I reduced the values of "additional_system" (used >for driving all equipment that is hotwired to the battery >bus, below the battery switch, whenever battery switch is >ON), to something like this: >additional_system=0, 0.1, 17.0 >the FSUIPC extended battery life fix was no longer needed. Yes, I've set that to 0, 1.0, 16.0. Apparently the clock and Electric Turn Indicator are supplied by that buss. Clearly, they shouldn't take 17 amperes. I also set different systems to drop out at different voltages. With the starter last (~15.0 V). That way, if electrical devices start failing I have a warning that the generator switch is not on (or, the engine not running) and I can still start the engine if necessary. Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Thanks, I just couldn't figure out what those were. Thought >it might be a light on the N number! Is that "from the sides >only?" >>I was wondering if there were special mounting or visibility >criteria, because the nav lights always seem to be mounted >on an angle at the front of the wing. Which means they are >not visible from all angles. I see there is a purpose in >that design. >>BTW you must really be swamped with customer support! That was a typo before... it should have read, "visible only from the rear and sides.If you see two white lights ahead of you, then you know that the a/c is headed away from you!If you see red/white, or green/white, you have reason for fright!On the other hand, if you see red/green..."Dive! Dive! Aaaahhhoooooggggaaaahhhh!Oddly enough, in spite of > 14,000 d/l's, I've had surprisingly little CS issues. Maybe 15 or so... I think it's clear enough that folks are wanting something new and fresh, and not just another 'big a.. jet!'"Oh, another A320? Yawn..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> Yes, I've set that to 0, 1.0, 16.0. Apparently the clock >and Electric Turn Indicator are supplied by that buss. >Clearly, they shouldn't take 17 amperes. Does anyone have information on how much current is drawn from usual equipment, it would be helpful. I find most of the "default" values quite strange, to say the least, but still I have little idea what to change them to.> I also set different systems to drop out at different >voltages. With the starter last (~15.0 V). That way, if >electrical devices start failing I have a warning that the >generator switch is not on (or, the engine not running) and >I can still start the engine if necessary. Very nice approach, requires a keen eye and a little sense of logic one usually doesn't develop in a sim. Btw; some gauge code can also make working "primers", by applying some logic checks utilizing OAT and Oil Tmperatures, together with starter and primer clicks (no "runtime" code is required), "simply" by clogging up the fuel lines. (Oh, different from my earlier approach which I posted).Did I put some ideas into panel and gauge designers? Well, mission accomplished :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been looking for these values also. None of the autopilot manuals seem to mention any current draw in the specs, at least not the TrueTrak or S-Tec ones I have. The DigiTrak is so simple it appears to only have a quick reference.Strobe lights are one area I have researched. There are 12, 14 and 28 volt systems. I assume that 12 volt systems are mostly used on ultralight aircraft given their homebuilt nature probably used motorcycle or auto batteries. I'm a little surprised to see a lack of 24 volt systems, because that would be the natural result of using two auto batteries (if you wanted more voltage).Some figures for strobes:Couple of misc. strobes10 amps at 12v2 amps at 12vFlight Strobe FS-44003 amp at 14v1.5 amp at 28v anti-collision flasher (35 watt halogen)2.7 amp at 14vOne strobe is powered by the "lighting coil" of the Rotax ignition system. I have no idea how you would model this in FS2002. It does not even model a 2 cycle engine (note I said 2 cycle, not a 2 cyl. engine).Solid state strobe500ma at 12v (battery source expected)Magnum DCapprox 2 amp at 10-18vmini solid state (commonly avail. 35 watt halogen bulb, for UA)no amps given, 12volt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, this one goes straight to my archives.As for the two-stroke, you can always use engine RPM*2, coupled with a timer or counter of some sort, to toggle the strobes, but instead of using a strobe light/circuit, us recognition lights instead. I assume the coil will charge a condenser (?) which when "full" will discharge and flash the strobeI'm using engine RPM to modify the needle position of my ammeter, "simulating" a "shaking" needle at RPM, to show fluctuations in the charge. Have NO idea if it is correct (no POH is THAT detailed), but it sure looks cool :D Could even be used for shaking fuel-needles in small GA-aircraft.Do you happen to know "the rest" of amperes drawn from various systems? (Okay, I'm pushing it :D)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears, and I say appears, because you have to do a lot of catalog browsing. :-) That most flashing strobes or beacons have their own "flasher" unit. Like a turn signal flasher on a 67 Plymouth, only these are a little more sophisticated. Some are quite boxy and must be a legacy of older designs while some of the ultralight and newer designs seem to have solid state flashers that are either very small boxes or integrated into the base of the lamp. (BTW All the experimental/homebuilt aircraft devices are moving toward digital now, more so than the general aviation stuff I see in the catalogs. The S-Tec autopilots for example are still stuck on a turn coordinator sensor system and drive motors where the TruTrak use GPS turn information and drive the control wires with stepper motors like your hard disk.)Based on this, I would _assume_ the Rotax lighting coil may actaully put out a constant current? Possibly used for other lights. I should visit the Rotax website (they must have one).BTW one of the projects I looked at on the web the guy built a retractable landing light out of one of those halogen desk lamps with a "globe" type shade. It pops down through a small hatch like a pod.I intend to keep looking for figures to plug into the electrical system instead of those generic values most FS aircraft seem to use. The first thing I did was comment out the landing gear motor. There is so much to research, wings, center of gravity, electrical because I am not modelling a real aircraft I cannot just refer to the plans!I need power consumpton figures forat least the average autopilot drive motors, if not the DigiTrakcom radiohow much basic avionics draw, transponder, radio, engine information display, probably not much because it is all solid stateIt's all going to take time. However, I might be able to ask some questions in the homeuilt aircraft newsgroup if I have time.Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>>I intend to keep looking for figures to plug into the >electrical system instead of those generic values most FS >aircraft seem to use. The first thing I did was comment out >the landing gear motor. There is so much to research, wings, >center of gravity, electrical because I am not modelling a >real aircraft I cannot just refer to the plans! >>I need power consumpton figures for >>at least the average autopilot drive motors, if not the >DigiTrak >>com radio >>how much basic avionics draw, transponder, radio, engine >information display, probably not much because it is all >solid state >>It's all going to take time. However, I might be able to ask >some questions in the homeuilt aircraft newsgroup if I have >time. >Steve I had to change some currents I'd estimated for the DF Archer after better were obtained. I know pitot heat took 5 A (I think that was at 12 VDC, it would be half as much at 24 VDC). The landing light was only a couple of amperes. Must be dim. Solid state radios shouldn't take much current, though it would increase on Transmit. By perhaps 1.5 A (12 V system). The PoH gave the full load current at night. It was about 33 A. If one can see the ckt breaker numbers, they should be at least double the normal load. Though, a 10 A breaker might protect the wiring more than anything else, a solid state device on it might take less than 1 A. I found the "additional_system" powered only the Clock and Turn Coordinator for the panels I checked. An electric clock would take virtually nothing and the Electric Turn Coordinator might run 1 A. At least, that's what I set so the unrealistic high current set by MS wouldn't drain the battery.Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some other misc. electrical values.A combination tach and voltmeter said the following about its warning lights:(voltage warning) Lights will trigger at 13 volts for 14V systems and 25 volts for 28V system. Accuracy, plus or minus. 2 volts.Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this