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Guest nycflyer

O/T ... some great F18 pics

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WOW! Excellent pics. I love the one with the condensation forming while it climbs.Take careMike

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shame the F 16 model you can download doesn't work properly otherwise we could have an on-line areobatic team !!! has anyone thought of that yet?

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Very impressive shots! I'm a huge fan of the Blue Angeles and have never missed their performance at Brunswick Naval Air Station.Is there a web site where we can see more? Rich@KLEWBeige G3 233 MHz DT rev.1 G4 400 MHz NewerTech upgrade OS 9.2.2 384 MB RAM ATI Radeon Mac (PCI) Thrustmaster FCS/WCS

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I'm not sure where they came from. I got them from my Dad's old Navy roomate.-----------------------Scott CannizzaroPPSEL-KTEBAMD xp2000+ - GF4 Ti4400G4/400 - Radeon32

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That third pic, the white stuff is water vapour (right?) as a result of the latent heat of vapourisation of water and natural degradation/dissapation of energy in the form of heat. Sufficient energy is produced at or above Mach 1 (Dont ask me how; its to do with friction of air molecules isnt it? and the transition of a gas to a liquid (incompressible) when flowing @ a speed higher than that which sound propagates thruogh it??). So, has that plane broken the sound barrier?!?!Despite the physics principles, they are some very nice exposures!http://flytsim.itgo.com/sigi.jpg

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Mr. Clark,I might be able to help you out a little. I have a Minor in physics and have taken many physics, chemisty, aerodynamics, and thermodyamics classes. I believe that you are correct by stating that the vapor is caused by the heat of vaporization (Lv). However, the mechanism that you suggest I believe is somewhat inaccurate. This plane IS NOT at a velocity of MACH 1.0 or greater. Blue Angels and US military shows WILL NOT allow this to happen, in the states anyway. However, they push to MACH 1.0. I talked to a THUNDERBIRD pilot at an airshow and he said they were not allowed to go over MACH 0.95 or they would be removed from the flight demonstration team, and face military sanctions. Liquids are somewhat compressible (theortically), gas obviously are compressible, and solids are not. On a molecular level all air surrounding an aircraft regardless of speed (whether taxing, cruise flight, inverted, spins, stalling, etc.) experience molecular compression. Yet, vaporization is defined as the physical change of state from liquid to gas. Let's ASSUME! that we can call the water concentration in the air (reguardless of humidity) is fully saturated, thus at dew point temperature. Then we can therefore say that at a SUB-SONIC (less than MACH 1.0) speed, the SHEAR FORCE and heat caused by the extreme force the pilot put on the plane (about 8-9g's instantaneously :-eek) created a large amount of heat on the leading edge of the wing causing the LIQUID molecular water (H20) in the air to change to a gasous state, thus VAPORIZE. Notice where the vapor is located. It is near the fuselage of the FA-18 where the cross-sectional area and weight of the aircraft is the greatest. The greatest problem with my theory is the ASSUMPTION. Assumptions are very dangerous in science. How can we prove that the water in the air is of liquid form? In some scense (sp) it is because it is obviously floating in the air. Clouds are derived from water in the air and yet we can SEE them. How can liquid water FLOATING in the air be vaporized into a gas?.. heheh answer and theories lead to many other questions. That's what I love about science.. hehe At high altitudes the air is MUCH cooler. The standard adiabatic (dry air) lapse rate is 2 degrees/C per thousand feet of altitude. Thus, as a rough calculation, on a 10 degree (surface temp) day the temperature at 30,000 ft will be -50 degrees celsius. Thus, when we look up at the sky and see contrails two contrails from Transport Aircraft we KNOW it is cause by the heat of vaporization. The extemely heated air from the Turbojet engine exhaust cause the sourounding water molecules in the air to be vaporized, thus we see jet vapor trails all the time. Now at a supersonic speed (MACH 1.0-MACH 3.8) (Hypersonic= MACH 3.8- MACH 8.0!) I have no idea. The chemistry and physics gets increadibly complicated! :-eek lol Yet, I have done some independent studying on supersonic airframe design.But then again, several PhD level physicsyts (sp) have THEORETICALLY proved that an ELEPHANT can be hung by a thread and not break. :-eek :-hang lol I hope I didn't blow you away with to many details.Maybe, all those hellasiously hard classes did pay off a little. hehehYours Truly,CB :-wave

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This one is supersonic.-----------------------Scott CannizzaroPPSEL-KTEBAMD xp2000+ - GF4 Ti4400G4/400 - Radeon32

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Excellent shot. I used that as my wallpaper a few years ago. I wonder if that is real?CB

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This is how it was described to me:"Every so often, just the right combination of conditions and events occur to create an unbelievable event. In this case, an F-18 passes through the sound barrier. Not only were the water vapor, density and temperature just right, but there happened to be a camera in the vicinity to capture the moment. The F-18 is actually in transonic flight, with normal shock waves emanating from behind the canopy and across the wings and fuselage. The condition will last for only an instant, and once supersonic flow exists completely around the aircraft, sharp-angled sonic cones replace the normal shock waves. The odds of getting a shot like this are staggering."-----------------------Scott CannizzaroPPSEL-KTEBAMD xp2000+ - GF4 Ti4400G4/400 - Radeon32

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