Sign in to follow this  
Guest Smiley

Question regarding medical for PPL

Recommended Posts

I am about to join our local flying club and hopefully finish up my PPL, which I started almost 12 years ago but ran out of time and money. I'm concerned because, as a patient, I tend to have "cuff syndrome". That means my blood pressure rises even as I enter the parking lot of my physician. I can feel it happen, and at my last physical I was told I was borderline for treatment of hypertension. Does anyone know the cutoff for bloodpressure for a flight physical? Also, can you receive a student certificate if you are being treated for hypertension? I'm guessing the latter is yes but I'm almost as concerned about the implications of being branded as someone with high blood pressure as I am about hypertension itself. Oh, it probably wouldn't hurt if I lost 30 lbs either but I want to get started with lessons ASAP.BTW, I took a quick orientation flight Sunday - first time in control of a Cessna in many years! Amazing how much it felt like the Archer in FS2K2! Everything was right where I expected them to be - cities, towns, roads, lakes, grass strips. Very cool! Although my last flight time was in 1988, the instructor agreed I was still proficient enough to count my 14 hours I had accumulated. Thanks Microsoft!David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

David,Thankfully, it was only through my pilot medical that I discovered that I had high blood pressure. I say thankfully because I am now on medication and my pressure is back to normal. Risky to leave it untreated.Anything over 140/80 is regarded as borderline. Above 150/90 is high.I passed the medical conditional on going onto medication to bring it under control.Good luck.Airdog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thirty one years ago, I was "thrown" out of the U.S. Army for about the same thing. Borderline at the physical, but high on the first day of going to boot camp. I had already begun flight lessons & figured this would effectively end any flight career. Never did recieve any medication, & insurance physicals through the later years went fine "blood pressure" wise. Twenty years later, after no "real" bloodpressure problems, I took up flying again. Went clear to the solo stage before my medical, just in case :). The original "problem" is listed on my flight medical papers, but with the notation "no change". My BP is usually in the 122/70's range.L.Adamson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, guys! Glad to know I'm not the only one in this situation. I'll try and put my medical off as long as possible and try to lose some weight and exercise in the meantime (guess I'll go to Subway for lunch ;-)). THanks again.David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, you may want to consult with AOPA. If you are a member, they'll answer anything you want and are extremely knowledgable. If you aren't a member, they may still give some advice. Also, it's a great organization and the dues are worth it for the magazine (AOPA Pilot). They provide a ton of support for civil aviation.www.aopa.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David,When it's time to go in for your flight physical you can go early in the morning and your blood pressure (ok for normal conditions) will be lower than say, after work. Something to think about.120/70 morning 130/80 afternoon avg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this