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Guest jonpoint

RE: Addresses

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Sorry for being off-topic but I just got an email from 'avsim.com' asking for my address but it didn't say who was asking! It had something to do with UK South so that narrows it down considerably :-)Please reply to the address below and I'll pass it on. Thanks.Jon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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Sorry Jon, I didn't realise AVSIM didn't give sender's names! Mia culpa.

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S'alright!Blame my inability to use Outlook Express :-(As soon as I hit 'reply', your address showed up!!?! Bleedin' XP! Its slow, awkward and still crashes a lot. Sure, the PC doesn't need rebooting but programs still crash and you have to endlessly terminate them. Also, accessing data on our network is s l o w ... Dunno why but when I click on a network drive icon (or shortcut to a network folder) I get the bleedin' hourglass for 2 minutes :-grr Never happened with 98, doesn't happen with the Win2K laptop or Purchasing's 95 PC, just my bleedin' XP...Yawn...Jon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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How odd.I'd rate XP as the most painless OS I've ever run (including several versions of Linux), the only time I've ever had any trouble with it was when I installed AOL 7.0. That crashed regularly and didn't uninstall properly either, it left the dial-up connection behind in the network adaptor list causing me no end of network difficulty until I deleted it.Your mileage may vary of course...Rich.

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"Your mileage may vary of course..."Rich, I'm not saying its BAD, just infuriating sometimes. For example, when using 98, if my mouse locked-up I knew the PC had crashed. In XP, when starting an application the mouse frequently goes dead for a few seconds, then the icon you just clicked on deselects. You think "musn't have double clicked it" so you do it again. 5 seconds later TWO versions of the software open...It installed like a dream and the entire PC was usable straight away. No fiddling with drivers etc and most applications work straight off. Of course, to anyone well-versed in setting up PCs this makes no difference. Its really just the installer that's better here. I can set up a PC in 95/98/ME just as quickly but then I don't let the installer do much beyond transferring files (and I copy them to the HD first anyway to make it quicker - XP wouldn't let me do that).Apart from easy install, XP's big 'advantage' is the NT file system. This is not new (we've had various versions of NT around the office for years) - Win2K was NT-based and not exactly a hot seller due to overheads. XP only works for many because they have 1GHz+ PCs. Beyond that, unless you have a fairly recent PC (my office PC is a P3) the OS overhead will slow you down immensly. I'm not interested in benchmarks - I look at how often I wait for the PC to do something. Going from 98 to XP means a lot more waiting. To those who only ever use one program at a time and don't care to know how it works, XP shines. And, regardless of crashes, I haven't lost any data - yet ;)PS We also had to change all of our workgroup names in the office network because XP restricts the usable characters for workgroup names. This took an extra day's work :-grrIt's no 'great leap forward' as Micro$oft reckon :-hahJon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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