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Guest jsok737

737 N1% profiles (SWA)

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Guest jsok737

Hey guys, I would like to know the profiles of the 737. I do not like flying the VNAV...I would like to hand fly the 737, instead of hitting the VNAV which SWA has inop. What I am looking for is 1: pitch angle and N1% to hold at different stages of flight: EG takeoff 15 degrees nose up, V2 + 15, climb %, cruise % and descent to give certain airspeeds. If anyone knows this, this would be a big help. I like to fly with numbers.Thank you guys and have a safe onehttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/ng_driver.jpg

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Guest Lobaeux4

I'm not too sure there are numbers for that, I could, and probably am wrong. Most airliners fly using VNAV of some sort, that tends to be the most fuel-efficient and best for pax comfort.BUT, I'd be interested to know as well. I like to hand-fly a/c up to level off as well.

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Guest tmetzinger

>I'm not too sure there are numbers for that, I could, and>probably am wrong. Most airliners fly using VNAV of some>sort, that tends to be the most fuel-efficient and best for>pax comfort.>BUT, I'd be interested to know as well. I like to hand-fly>a/c up to level off as well.>SWA generally flies as follows:No autothrottles!Cost Index is 36. N1 is programmed using the FMC. Derated takeoffs are permitted but derated climbs are not.Climb is done in LVL CHG at 250 below 10,000, 290-300 above.Cruise is done by manually adjusting throttles to maintain the programmed cruise speed.Descents are normally done using VS above 10,000, referring to the DES page for the proper vertical speed, and the throttles are set to maintain a target speed of 280. This constant rate of descent is more passenger friendly than LVL CHG. Below 10,000, it's often more important to maintain airspeed control, so LVL CHG is often used at 240 knots, and throttles are used to adjust the rate of descent.This is information about six month old from one of my pilot friends at SWA.Best wishes,

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Guest Robin.B

Tim,That's very interesting info. Is this for safety reasons (A.k.a trying to keep the pilots' skills more up to scratch) or for some sort of ecenomy?

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Guest tmetzinger

>Tim,>>That's very interesting info. Is this for safety reasons>(A.k.a trying to keep the pilots' skills more up to scratch)>or for some sort of ecenomy?Southwest started off with the 737-200 series, and actually only retired it's last -200 in 2005.While there's only one type rating for the B737 aircraft, as you can imagine, there are many many differences between the -200 and the -900. Airline operators are required to give their pilots supplemental "difference training" when a pilot moves from one aircraft version to another of the same type. The less complicated the differences between the versions, the shorter and cheaper the training becomes.SWA, from the beginning, adopted a business model that maximized efficiency. They fly ONLY the 737 model, so they don't have different "types" of pilots the way an operator like Continental (with the 737, 757, 767) does.Further, SWA took the "single type" philosophy and applied it to the different versions as well. The EFIS/MAP option on the glass cockpit of the NGs, that looks like a conventional "six pack" of instruments? That was a response from Boeing to a specific request of SWA (and others too). It does away with a major part of differences training, since the pilot instrument scan is unchanged from a -300 to a -500 to a -700. The autothrottles are the same way. By eliminating them on the advanced models (because the early models didn't have them), there's no need for training on their operation, on VNAV, or on all the different failure modes for the system.This results in SWA having a shorter training cycle (saving $$$$) and any SWA pilot being qualified to fly any SWA airplane (saving $$$$ and giving them a lot of flexibility in operations). They also feel that a crew more involved with the airplane (as opposed to sitting back and letting the automation do the work) is safer. It's a big part of the SWA culture, along with the leather jackets worn by the pilots, the lack of assigned seats, and the attitude of the employees.

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An amazing theory SWA has?! Especially in times you have to do some troubleshooting is it much more easier to let the plane do it's job. It would take a lot of work load out of youre hands.Cerio,John

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Guest andyman

And no VNAV or AT. but if you want to you can... that's cool too.

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Guest andyman

I mean if He is flying the PMDG NG.

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Guest Lobaeux4

Tim,That's some cool insight into SWA's ops. I've got a friend who's in one of their new classes, maybe I'll ask him as well. Makes sense I guess.

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