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Chaos81

Takeoff/landing distances for the MD-11

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The topic on the MD-11 video got me to thinking.Markus, or anyone else that can answer, what is the takeoff length for the MD-11 at MTOW. Likewise for the landing, what would it be at MLW? I did some quick Google searching, but didn't come up with anything. Feel free to throw in any other numbers you can think of. I'd like to learn as much as I can about the plane before the release. ;)


Mike Roth

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Guest FlyMD11.nl

Hi Mike, I went into some graphs from which you can calculate the landing distances. I've had to make some assumptions to compare numbers.First of all there's a difference in Dipatch Landing Distance (used in planning to obtain the maximum dispatchable weight, big margins) and the Calculated Landing Distance (Used in the cockpit to obtain a (somewhat rough but still legal because it's on the high side) distance just before landing.Derived from the Dispatch Landing Distance:A fully loaded MD-11 (LW of 199,600 KGs), all systems serviceable, Dry runway would need:@Flaps 35, no headwind: 2340 m@Flaps 35, 40 kts headwind: 1940 mThe graphs go off the scale below 1400 m, that means that dipatch to a shorter runway than that is not allowed (until you get numbers for that runway)@Flaps 50, no headwind: 2160 m@Flaps 50, 40 kts headwind: 1740 mThe graphs still go off the scale below 1400 m, that means that dipatch to a shorter runway than that is not allowed (until you get numbers for that runway)If you would do the same in the graph for Calculated Landing Distances you would get (at Autobrakes MAX):@Flaps 35, no headwind: 1740 m@Flaps 35, 30 kts headwind: 1440 m@Flaps 50, no headwind: 1670 m@Flaps 50, 30 kts headwind: 1370 mYou can see that the second batch of numers is lower than the ones derived in the Dispatch phase, that's probably because you can use lower margins if more information is readily available to you. In the dispatch phase all the numbers used are the ones in the most negative case. During the approach preparation youalrady have the actual weather, weight and configuration.Remcowww.inflightweekly.com

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Thanks for the information Remco.


Mike Roth

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